#1
i am a beginner and i can play major scale ove whole fretboard but now i want to start intervals but not getting the startig point someone plz send me some good and easy docs or links to start intervals i am abeginer
#4
Trust me, it's better to learn through a teacher.
Internet lessons are ok, but you might get led the wrong way

Just be careful.
But that site seems good.
Use the trainer to get better and sharper
#5
[quote="'Anno[fzk"]']Trust me, it's better to learn through a teacher.
Internet lessons are ok, but you might get led the wrong wayGuitar teachers, the kind people usually get, arent that good. They normally get carried away teaching songs (which people can learn on their own), and than seldom talk about technique. It'd be rare to find a teacher who both knows theory and likes teaching it.

If you want to learn theory from a person in real life, jam with random musicians who know how to jam. Jam with saxophonists, pianists, guitarists, bassists, anyone. Thats how people used to learn their theory.
#7
Actually.. I wouldn't learn from a guitar instructor
Yes, very true. It's like they get carried away from theory and just go on technique and songs.
But you have to keep in mind you are paying for a guitar instructor.
I'd try going to a school to learn theory (High school or college)
It's great, and really challenging.

http://www.musictheory.net/
Is a good site. I like the Flash based lessons and trainers
It's genius
#8
Musictheory.net is a great resource. Just make sure that you don't have all the intervals checked when you begin or this will be very difficult.

I recommend starting with perfect 5th, major 3rd, unison and octave. Once you can ID all those at about 80-90% start adding more.

Check out the link in my sig. for a good ebook that guides you through stuff like this.
#9
Quote by demonofthenight
Guitar teachers, the kind people usually get, arent that good. They normally get carried away teaching songs (which people can learn on their own), and than seldom talk about technique. It'd be rare to find a teacher who both knows theory and likes teaching it.

If you want to learn theory from a person in real life, jam with random musicians who know how to jam. Jam with saxophonists, pianists, guitarists, bassists, anyone. Thats how people used to learn their theory.


My guitar teacher knows all his theory, and we do alot of stuff based only on theory and technique. I have not actually learned a song with him. However, I seem to have a greater interest in theory than he says any other of students have.
#10
Here's a little something:

The sound (mood, or color) of the intervals

2nds are thought of as: dissonant, tight, sharp-edged

maj 3rds are thought of as: happy, brite, passive, resolving

min 3rds are thought of as: sad, dark, moody

perfect 4ths are thought of as: foundational, strong, needing to resolve downward

augmented 4ths are thought of as: dissonant, sinister, needing to resolve upward

diminished 5ths are thought of as: dissonant, sinister, needing to resolve upward

major 6ths are thought of as: emotive, moving, soaring

minor 6ths are thought of as: provocative, stirring, lamenting

major 7ths are thought of as: tense, lush, loving

minor 7ths are thought of as: hard edged, strong willed, pivotal

Now an exercise:

Play all 2nds up and down each of the 5 sets of 2 adjacent strings (strings next to each other)

Do the same with 3rds, 4ths, 5ths, 6ths

Then the 6ths, this time skipping a string in between notes (4 sets of non-adjacent strings)

Then 7ths on that same set of non adjacent strings

Next...

Move from one kind of interval to another:

2nd to 3rd, 2nd to 4th, 2nd to 5th, 2nd to 6th, 2nd to 7th
3rd to 2nd, 3rd to 4th, 3rd to 5th, 3rd to 6th, 3rd to 7th
4th to 2nd, 4th to 3rd, 4th to 5th, 4th to 6th, 4th to 7th
5th to 2nd, 5th to 3rd, 5th to 4th, 5th to 6th, 5th to 7th
6th to 2nd, 6th to 3rd, 6th to 4th, 6th to 5th, 6th to 7th
7th to 2nd, 7th to 3rd, 7th to 4th, 7th to 5th, 7th to 6th

Exhausting?

Move slowly, take time to absorb it, dont try to understand it all at once...

I hope this has been helpful...

Peace,

Scott