#1
I was wondering how one would write modal chord progressions. See, in an Ionian mode chord progression, one can simply resolve to the I using a V7. However I'm not sure how you would make a strong cadence in any other mode. I know that in the Aeolian mode one can also use the V minor or even a V major.

What rules apply for the other modes? What are some of the strongest chord progressions in the other modes? I know that in the major mode, the strongest chord progression would be IV -> ii -> V7 -> I. Does this also apply to the other modes? Help me out UG!

(I'm mainly interested in the Lydian mode)

Michal
#2
The fifth and fourth degree of any chord resolve well. Thats pretty general for any chord, especially major chords, but maybe not diminished chords. I've personally never seen modes usefull in writing chord progressions, it has been done though with some nice results. I've seen modes more as a melodic device used to improvise and write melodies.

But a dominant fifth degree chord generally resolves especially nicely to any chord. Just remember that going from a V7-i would mean a harmonic minor and meant that you should use phrygian major (or aeolian major if you see it fit, but not most likely not mixolydian) over that V7 and harmonic minor over that i chord. Dominant fifth chords lead nicely to other chords.
#3
Quote by michal23
I know that in the Aeolian mode one can also use the...V major.
I like the major V chord a lot, but it's not modal if you leave the mode!

The way I've learned modal chord progressions is that you take the modal tone (b2 for Phrygian, #4 for Lydian etc) and use the chords with that note. You're interested in Lydian, so I'll show you how to construct an F Lydian progression.

The F chord is needed, obviously, so you'll use that, most likely first. You may want to play Fmaj7#11, too. The modal tone is the #4, B, to you take the chords with that note, G, Em, Bdim. The diminished chord will want to resolve to C, so forget about it. Just use G and Em. So your available chords are Fmaj7#11, G, Em. I would suggest using only two of the chords in your vamp, not all three.

My favorite modal progression, however, is Dorian. Here's an example of D Dorian.
Dm is needed, perhaps Dm7. The modal tone is B, so the chords are Em and G, but not Bdim for reasons mentioned earlier. The classic dorian vamp is Dm7 G7.
#4
Quote by demonofthenight
The fifth and fourth degree of any chord resolve well. Thats pretty general for any chord, especially major chords, but maybe not diminished chords. I've personally never seen modes usefull in writing chord progressions, it has been done though with some nice results. I've seen modes more as a melodic device used to improvise and write melodies.

But a dominant fifth degree chord generally resolves especially nicely to any chord. Just remember that going from a V7-i would mean a harmonic minor and meant that you should use phrygian major(or aeolian major if you see it fit, but not most likely not mixolydian) over that V7 and harmonic minor over that i chord. Dominant fifth chords lead nicely to other chords.


Shouldnt it be Phrygian Dominant?

The so called Phrygian dominant would be altered to have a major seventh as the tonic, which would thus be a different name for the double harmonic major, which would not work well over a V7.