#1
What's a simple way to learn the whole of the fretboard?
I dont really know where to start
#3
Quote by webbtje
1st fret of the E string?


Well, yeah but if i just go down the frets and say the notes it doesnt really sink in and i dont remember it.
#4
As far as soloing you might want to start with Minor Pentatonic, or learn your barred, power, and triads if you havnt already.
#5
you mean where certain scales are? or if youre on x fret on y string you are playing G? either way it takes a while.

you could just get a diagram of the fretboard in certain scales to start with. good knowledge of theory helps too.
#6
sight read some music,

or work out some patterns of the fretboard. eg in standard tuning, if you know the bottom e string then you know the top e string and if you play octaves 6th string rooted then you would realise the notes of the D string.

when playing any music on the guitar test yourself as ur going along too
#7
Learn the pentatonic shapes, yeah, but make sure that you're also learning the notes that make them up. If you just memorize the shapes, then won't get as much out of it as if you consciously recognized each of the notes in the Am pentatonic scale while playing them.
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#8
Quote by Sabaren
you mean where certain scales are? or if youre on x fret on y string you are playing G? either way it takes a while.

you could just get a diagram of the fretboard in certain scales to start with. good knowledge of theory helps too.


That's what i mean. Where should I start? Should i learn the dotted notes first or whatever?
#9
Quote by doubtfull
That's what i mean. Where should I start? Should i learn the dotted notes first or whatever?

I'd recommend this; get a bunch of backing tracks in every key, and improvise over each key using only one string. Guitar players often think too much in boxes, start thinking horizontally. After you're comfortable with each string, move to another one and then start combining them.
#10
Quote by :-D
Guitar players often think too much in boxes, start thinking horizontally.


+1

think in terms of melody and play it however is the most efficient. the more comfortable you get with theory and such the more you will understand the fretboard. just knowing the intervals from string to string is a plus..
#11
I learned the notes on the fretboard by finding patterns etc.. eventually you can play a note right away and say that's G# or whatever
#12
I would recommend playing diatonic arpeggios all over the fretboard, saying the note names as you play them.
#13
Here's how I did it...

Quote by me!
There's only 12 notes on the guitar, they just keep repeating...it's only difficult if you don't take the time to break it down.

Here...

1 - learn the open strings...E, A, D, G, B, E
2 - familiarise yourself with the pattern of intervals along the open string, you don't even need to learn it by heart yet, just have it for reference.

3 - realise that the 12 fret is the octave of the open string, and therefore the same note.
4 - realise that the pattern of intervals is constant, so 12 th fret onwards is identical to open string onwards.

... as far as working out notes goes you are currently never more than 6 frets away from a reference note. However, counting along 6 frets is kind of clunky and not particularly easy, but it's a start.

5 - learn the notes that correspond to the next open string, so 5th fret on the E, A, D and B strings, 4th fret on the G

...all of a sudden you're never more than 3 frets way from a known reference note. All of a sudden working out the notes you don't know became a lot easier...almost twice as easy, in fact.

6 - locate the other octaves of the open notes, first the ones on the next string... 7th fret on the A, D, G and high E strings, 8th fret on the B string. Then the octaves two strings away so 2nd fret on the D and G strings, 3rd fret on the B and top E.

7 - in the same way, locate the octaves of the notes you learned in step 5

...all of a sudden you're now never more than 1 fret away from a known reference note, which basically means you know them all!
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