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#1
I'm doing an English report on the 'culture' of Emo, and I could really use some help on finding some sites that actually give a slight history on how it was back when it started, and how it became what it is today, and what exactly it is today.
Any help would be accepted...other than the usual 'I hate emos...they're ****', and other bashing.
Thanks

Oh, and fyi, I picked this topic, it wasn't assigned. But the teacher thought it'd be cool.
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Last edited by Damone_player07 at Apr 5, 2008,
#5
Quote by Jericho114
My chemical Romance


You've already steered the TS in the complete wrong direction. Don't be stupid.
#6
I already know that MCR isn't emo....they're crap, in my opinion...haha
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#7
Quote by Damone_player07
I already know that MCR isn't emo....they're crap, in my opinion...haha


I disagree but I respect that a whole lot more than thinking they're emo lol

I think todays emo is just like glam-goth really. Style wise anyway
#8
yeah...I get that vibe too.
I just figured it'd be an interesting topic to write on, and the whole culture of where it originated and what it is exactly is just kinda neat.
I still don't get how it came from hardcore and punk though...
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#10
Emo is an offshoot of Hardcore punk. One of the first emo bands was Rites of spring, whose singer Guy Picciotto would later be in the band Fugazi with Minor Threat's Ian Mackaye. Other early emo bands include Gray Matter, Moss Icon and Embrace.

Fugazi, along with other early bands like Cap'n Jazz, helped emo ease in to the indie emo of the early and mid nineties. Some of examples of these bands are Sunny Day Real Estate and Texas is the reason.

Other bands disregared the transition into indie. These bands chose to intensify the hardcoreness with screaming and **** like that. This would go on to be what is now known as Screamo or Post-Hardcore. I don't really listen to the old bands like this, but some modern bands are Alexisonfire, Chiodos and Circle takes the square.

Other bands like At the Drive-in went more experimental with their music.

Some emo like Jawbreaker maintained the sound of early emo bands well into the 90s. These bands went on to influence the punk and pop punk acts that are now what is considered emo.
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Last edited by Cameronrobson at Apr 4, 2008,
#11
well I jus see emo as a fashion more then a music type. But you probably would want to have some about MCR because they've been at the forefront of the latest wave. Even though I wouldn't really call any band emo
#13
Jawbreaker!
I don't really know anything, except Jawbreaker are badass.
*expects Streetlight and element*
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#14
It has a lot to do with individualism, IMO.

It's almost ironic. They want to be individuals, when in reality, there's a million people out there doing the same exact thing.

Same goes for people in any fad, IMO.
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#16
Really I think it's just a term now. One person labelled a pop punk band as emo and the title just carried on to others until it reached the mainstream. It seems as if emo is just a new word for pop-punk.

On a side note: Fugazi forever \m/
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#17
I would probably mention about how there became a time period when it was the cool, social norm to be depressed and hate your life. One of the ways this was carried out was by listening to the appropriate music with negative and depressing themes and lyrics. Therefore the bands that provided this music became successful, creating copycat bands who wanted a piece of the pie. This lead to many bands sharing the same style and created the third wave of Emo that is described in Wikipedia. The accompanying fashion trend was simply created by such teenagers dressing similar to the bands they liked, creating the stereotype of tight jeans and black hair with long bangs, etc.

That's always been my opinion of how the Emo craze started, if you don't like it, don't use it. Just try not to flame me.
#18
I do like it.
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#19
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
You've already steered the TS in the complete wrong direction. Don't be stupid.


Apparently you haven't been to an MCR concert. I have, and there's emo's everywhere. I was making a joke, I didn't think there was any that would be offended so easily . Either way though I'll stand by my word, MCR helped Emo's feel comfortable in how they look, at least a little bit.
#20
Emos are not emo and have probably never listened to emo music.
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#21
The funny thing is that MCR are huge fans of bands like Jawbreaker, Get Up Kids, Black Flag, Misfits and other punk/emo bands.
MCR ARE just rock music though. Emo image. Rock Music
#23
Quote by the1
The funny thing is that MCR are huge fans of bands like Jawbreaker, Get Up Kids, Black Flag, Misfits and other punk/emo bands.
MCR ARE just rock music though. Emo image. Rock Music

IMO, Black Parade is just rock, Sweet Revenge is rrock, pop punk and post-hardcore, Bullets is post-hardcore.
two and a half men.
#25
Quote by timo1
+1
Especially in Mexico
Emo sorta started with the Seattle grunge scene
I have no idea how it got to where it is now tho

You're thinking of the DC hardcore scence, grunge has nothing to do with emo.
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#26
Quote by Jericho114
Apparently you haven't been to an MCR concert. I have, and there's emo's everywhere. I was making a joke, I didn't think there was any that would be offended so easily . Either way though I'll stand by my word, MCR helped Emo's feel comfortable in how they look, at least a little bit.


I have been. And they're wasn't a lot of emos.

It's not that I'm easily offended, I just get really defensive over bands I respect.
#29
Quote by Damone_player07
I'm doing an English report on the 'culture' of Emo, and I could really use some help on finding some sites that actually give a slight history on how it was back when it started, and how it became what it is today, and what exactly it is today.
Any help would be accepted...other than the usual 'I hate emos...they're ****', and other bashing.
Thanks

ask in the pop punk and emo forum. Im fairly sure theres a huge thread on the history of emo.
#30
Quote by str84ever
Are people still going on about emo.

I gave up caring a long time ago.

We're discussing emo, not bitching about it.
two and a half men.
#32
Quote by Cameronrobson
Emos are not emo and have probably never listened to emo music.
Truest post ever
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#33
Quote by StonaLemons
ask in the pop punk and emo forum. Im fairly sure theres a huge thread on the history of emo.
There is.

I wrote it.

Well one of them.
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Quote by Bob_Sacamano
i kinda wish we all had a penis and vagina instead of buttholes

i mean no offense to buttholes and poop or anything

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#34
Emo has turned in to the Goth-Indie stage now, bands like The Horrors and stuff.

I've noticed (on my travels around Birminghams teen scene places) that what people wear and express themselfs as changed as they get older.
At like 13-14 they're all into the latest mainstreem rock like MCR/Greenday/Fall out Boy or even Slipknot anddress in black etc to rebel against their parents and stuff.
But as they get older it steer towards Goth-Indie, more casual but more shocking: Black hair styled heavily with hair-spray, drainpipes and tight-fitting t-shirts.

You know a Goth-Inide because they love Noel Fielding (Might Boosh fame) to death even though they have only probably watched one episode of The Mighty Boosh and hated it but hey, that mainstream.
#35
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
I have been. And they're wasn't a lot of emos.

It's not that I'm easily offended, I just get really defensive over bands I respect.



- The concert I was at was full of emo's, and so was Warped Tour.

- Chill out, I like their music too.
#36
The cultural side is 'scene' and the musical side is emo. Although most people in the scene have never heard an actual emo band, just pop-punk/pop-rock.
#37
Quote by KwikKopy
I would probably mention about how there became a time period when it was the cool, social norm to be depressed and hate your life. One of the ways this was carried out was by listening to the appropriate music with negative and depressing themes and lyrics. Therefore the bands that provided this music became successful, creating copycat bands who wanted a piece of the pie. This lead to many bands sharing the same style and created the third wave of Emo that is described in Wikipedia. The accompanying fashion trend was simply created by such teenagers dressing similar to the bands they liked, creating the stereotype of tight jeans and black hair with long bangs, etc.

That's always been my opinion of how the Emo craze started, if you don't like it, don't use it. Just try not to flame me.


Note on the bolded statement: Unfortunately this is a matter of fact, not opinion, and so you're wrong.

TS, mention Rites of Spring, mention Sunny Day Real Estate, mention their tendancy to become emotionally charged on stage, the DC scene, mention how it influenced bands that were slightly more mainstream such as Thursday, MCR, etc, and mention how these bands adapted to become even more mainstream, eventually becoming more pop-punk and therefore widely listened to. Their look was adopted by their fans who made it more extreme to become the fashion it is today.

Oh and if you could put Thought Riot in there somewhere, that'd be great. Simply because they're an awesome band.
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#38
Quote by xX*Zeppelin*Xx
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emo

If everyone had to learn the history of emo the world would be a better place.


But it's still pretty annoying with those trying to prove that emo isn't the cutter and stuff. They just go like:
"amg emo is a music genre from the 70's lol it has nothing to do with cutting themself!!!111!!1!!"
Follow the smoke toward the riff filled land
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#39
another question to all knowing google. or wikipedia, whatever.
search "define: Emo"
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#40
dont do a report
dont give them any attention
hopefully they will get depressed we ignore them
and kill themselves.

then maybe we could get good music back
just give me a fender and let me rip
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