#1
I know basically how it works, it just takes me a very long time to work anything out.
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#2
Practice.


and for your sig, rap is a "real" music i suppose (whatever the **** thats supposed to mean), but you shouldn't just pull random generalizations and statistics out of your ass
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#3
Quote by BBell
Practice.



+1
At the end of the day, you can make your self lots of exercises to help familiarising yourself with notation, but the only way you're going to learn to read fluently is through lots of experience.
#7
Also, don't "learn" the songs. Play a song at a steady tempo, sight reading the whole thing, and NOT stopping for mistakes. Then play through a different piece. Play each piece only once before going on to the next piece. This way you will not be memorizing each piece, and thus will be truly sight reading each piece, which will improve your sight reading much more efficiently than had you gone out and memorized it all.
#8
Learning the notes on the staff is not the same as reading music...so be careful...just as knowing the notes on the fretboard, is not playing guitar...

The best way to learn to read music, is to put yourself in situations that REQUIRE it during performance, and believe me, you'll pick up on it...

Read charts, while listening to the corresponding performance...

If you ARE in a playing situation with other that CAN read...listen to the guys around you that are doing it, and read the chart while they play it correctly...

Learn how to interpret chord symbols on sight (Cmaj7...Bb7b5...F11...Gm9...C13...etc...)

Don't be deceived, rhythms are as important (probably more so) than single notes, or even chordal reading...learn what rhythms sound like, and feel like...(much of the charts you run into, will have only chord symbols and rhythmic accents)

Don't be deceived, reading single notes on guitar is NOT that difficult...as some would have you believe (with regard to the "many choices for the same pitch" argument) ...read positionally...and read ahead...always considering where you are and where you're going to make positional choices area by area...

A fantastic book for this is Tommy Tedesco's "For Guitar Players Only"...if you can find it...

Read through piano scores, sax solos, string quartets (always with the piece playing)...other instruments reading methods can help you on guitar...

Learn to read Bass Clef (or the "F" clef) ...many times you will read unison to a bass player's parts...

All of this will take time...there are no short-cuts...

Be patient....

I hope this has helped,

Scott


#9
Yeah rhythms are more important than notes. If I cannot keep my rhythms good, people will notice, and it will sound terrible. If I hit some wrong notes, I can act like I meant to play those notes, and people will think I did, leading to no problem.
#10
Quote by isaac_bandits
Yeah rhythms are more important than notes. If I cannot keep my rhythms good, people will notice, and it will sound terrible. If I hit some wrong notes, I can act like I meant to play those notes, and people will think I did, leading to no problem.


Absolutely.

And another good reason is that you may see a chart for a song (not TAB) and it's primarily chord symbols written with rhythmic cues and hits. If you know your chords, and can read the rhythms, you're ok in that situation.


#11
Yup, and if you can read rhythms and play them well, you will be tight, which is ultimately the most important aspect to a good performance.
#12
Quote by isaac_bandits
Yeah rhythms are more important than notes. If I cannot keep my rhythms good, people will notice, and it will sound terrible. If I hit some wrong notes, I can act like I meant to play those notes, and people will think I did, leading to no problem.


That's very true. Composers like Beethoven and Mozart agree with you on that; there's quotes out there somewhere.
*googles for quotes*
#13
Alright, thanks for all the suggestions guys.

And to BBell, it's a reference to a signature I saw on here a while ago, claiming that 92% of teenagers had moved onto rap, and that if you were one of the 8% who still listened to 'real music' to put it in your sig.
It's girls and spaghetti... We love girls and spaghetti!