#1
hey!

just making sure of something.

lets say im playing a C in the E shape in the middle 4 string set:

e
b 8
g 9
d 10
a 10
E

now, if i wanted to make this a diminished chord, i would flat my 3rd and 5th

e
b 7
g 8
d 10
a 9
E

and, if i wanted to make an augumented chord, i would sharp my 5th

e
b 9
g 9
d 10
a 11
E

what im asking, is when i make changes to my 3rd and 5th, do i have to do it to both? or just one of them?

thanks alot.
#2
you can make changes to any note in a chord and not have to do it to another note but as you probably know it changes the chord

EDIT: you can add notes as well making 6 or 7 chords

EDIT again: if you just flatten the 3rd it woud be minor and there's nothing wrong witht hat

how ever i can't find an exaple of a chord wiht 1 3 b5

the only b5 i can find are the X7 and diminished seventh 1 b3 b5 bb7
song stuck in my head today


Last edited by lbc_sublime at Apr 4, 2008,
#3
The flatted 5th is the defining trait of a diminished chord. You could leave out the third if you wanted to, but if you only flatted the third and left the 5th out it would just have a minor tonality. However, if you were to leave the third out, that means the third must not be played. If you have a major third interval then it will not have the diminished sound you're looking for. That'd be more like Xmaj#11 or something like that.
#4
It depends what chord you want to end up with. Flattening the 3rd makes it minor, flattening 3rd and 5th makes it diminished and sharpening the 5th makes augmented.
#5
thanks for the help guys but what im saying is.

in this

e
b 8
g 9
d 10
a 10
E

there are TWO fifths, if i was playing lets say an augumented, do i have to sharp both?
#6
Quote by Avedas
The flatted 5th is the defining trait of a diminished chord. You could leave out the third if you wanted to, but if you only flatted the third and left the 5th out it would just have a minor tonality. However, if you were to leave the third out, that means the third must not be played. If you have a major third interval then it will not have the diminished sound you're looking for. That'd be more like Xmaj#11 or something like that.


if you left out the 3rd of a diminished chord, it wouldn't be a chord anymore, and you wouldn't be able to tell what the harmony the notes were implying is either.

Quote by Slash Jr.
thanks for the help guys but what im saying is.

in this

e
b 8
g 9
d 10
a 10
E

there are TWO fifths, if i was playing lets say an augumented, do i have to sharp both?


yes.
#8
technically nobut that would take you awat from the pents and put you into the blues scale which uses the intervals 1 b3 4 b5 5 b7

i think you are talking pent with the caged i havn't studied that
song stuck in my head today


#11
Quote by lbc_sublime
i don't know what you call it but there is nothing saying you can't do it and if falls into the minor blues scale


k i know i CAN do it, but this has nothing to do with the blues scale.


im just making sure im building this the right way.
#13
^Which would be better with the G# named Ab instead, since either way, one must use an accidental.

With an Ab, it is just an Ab major chord.
#14
Quote by isaac_bandits
^Which would be better with the G# named Ab instead, since either way, one must use an accidental.

With an Ab, it is just an Ab major chord.



i like your way of thinking
song stuck in my head today


#15
Quote by Slash Jr.
k so lets say im playing a Cm(#5)

e
b 9
g 8
d 10
a 11
E

correct?


That's a G# Major....

EDIT: Whatever, forgot refresh.
#17
Quote by edg
Yeah, but it is also Cm#5. It all depends on context.

Chords can be funny things in that the same notes can be called different things
at different times.


Yes but the first note strummed is the root, which is an Ab.

You're in Musician Talk now
#18
Quote by Slash Jr.
hey!

just making sure of something.

lets say im playing a C in the E shape in the middle 4 string set:

e
b 8
g 9
d 10
a 10
E

now, if i wanted to make this a diminished chord, i would flat my 3rd and 5th

e
b 7
g 8
d 10
a 9
E

and, if i wanted to make an augumented chord, i would sharp my 5th

e
b 9
g 9
d 10
a 11
E

what im asking, is when i make changes to my 3rd and 5th, do i have to do it to both? or just one of them?

thanks alot.


You would change ALL of the 3rds and ALL of the 5ths.
#20
Quote by colohue
Yes but the first note strummed is the root, which is an Ab.

You're in Musician Talk now


LOL. It doesn't matter what the first note strummed is and the root doesn't
have to be the lowest note. The root isn't even required to impart a chord with
it's quality.

As long as the notes are there, it's not wrong to call the chord by any name that
fits without any other context. The context will pick the meaning/name that is
most appropriate. So, if you called that Cm7#5 or AbMajor, you both get a prize.
Everybody wins.

(Andrew Green's "Jazz Comping" illustrates nicely how a chord you might typically
call 1 name, can actually have a number of different names depending on context).
#21
Quote by edg
LOL. It doesn't matter what the first note strummed is and the root doesn't
have to be the lowest note. The root isn't even required to impart a chord with
it's quality.

As long as the notes are there, it's not wrong to call the chord by any name that
fits without any other context. The context will pick the meaning/name that is
most appropriate. So, if you called that Cm7#5 or AbMajor, you both get a prize.
Everybody wins.

(Andrew Green's "Jazz Comping" illustrates nicely how a chord you might typically
call 1 name, can actually have a number of different names depending on context).


Preferably, to help get the right voicing, it should be called Cm7#5/Ab.