#1
so, to built a major7 chord, you need

3rd major + 3rd minor + 3rd major = major7 chord

right?
so, a Cmajor7 chord is built up by these notes
C D# F# A#

right?

and I can play it like this

Cmaj7:2314XX

right????

i'm kinda new at this. please help me out.
thanks
Quote by ATM*
cool, two reports in one thread. You, sir, are a superstar.

*reported*

*again*


i'm a superstar
#2
right?
so, a Cmajor7 chord is built up by these notes
C D# F# A#


C-E-G-B

It consists of a root, a major third, a perfect fifth, and a major seventh.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
Theres a chord bulding lesson in the lessons section of this website....

But in the meantime whilst i look for the link....

a minor third is 3 semitones and a major third is 4 semitones.

EDIT: t/s check either this link http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/chords/what_chords_are_in_what_key_and_why.html or this one http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/chords/guide_to_chord_formation.html
Last edited by demonofthenight at Apr 5, 2008,
#4
owh okay. thnx.
so it is played like this
Cmaj7; X3200X
Quote by ATM*
cool, two reports in one thread. You, sir, are a superstar.

*reported*

*again*


i'm a superstar
#6
Quote by grunger
eh im more about just making chords, i still know the key but i really dont know about 4th and 5ths etc

im happy
maybe its time to learn?
#7
Quote by demonofthenight
maybe its time to learn?


i get lessons but my teacher doesnt teach me theory.

Hes got the idea that guitar is all feel and good ears...
Which is good cos im another feel dude. ehhhhhh ill learn over time i guess
#8
Quote by grunger
i get lessons but my teacher doesnt teach me theory.

Hes got the idea that guitar is all feel and good ears...
Which is good cos im another feel dude. ehhhhhh ill learn over time i guess


So... looking into a new teacher yet?
#9
Quote by Avedas
So... looking into a new teacher yet?
No wai, he's a feel guy. Theory and technique is for squares and people without lives.

Yawn, MT was awesome yestererday and the day before, it sucks today.
#10
Quote by rafael90
so, to built a major7 chord, you need

3rd major + 3rd minor + 3rd major = major7 chord

right?
so, a Cmajor7 chord is built up by these notes
C D# F# A#


Firstly you should know the musical alphabet.
A - (A#/Bb) - B - C - (C#/Db) - D - (D#/Eb) - E - F - (F#/Gb) - G - (G#/Ab)

So there are twelve notes, and after the twelfth they repeat.

Now, there are intervals. To count intervals, one count the number of semitones (two adjacent tones). Each number of semitones corresponds to two enharmonic interval. This means that they sound the same, but are different [C# - F, and Db - F]. Thy will have the same the same number of semitones separating them, but will be given different names as they use different letters. Certain intervals, are called perfect. Others are either major or minor. Major intervals are always one semitone greater than minor intervals. If you add one semitone to a major or perfect interval, while keeping the letters the same, but adding sharps or flats, it is called augmented. Reducing a minor or perfect interval by one semitone results in a diminished interval.

0 Semitones - Perfect Unison, Diminished Second
1 Semitone - Minor Second, Augmented Unison
2 Semitones - Major Second, Diminished third
3 Semitones - Minor Third, Augmented Second
4 Semitones - Major Third, Diminished Fourth
5 Semitones - Perfect Fourth, Augmented Third
6 Semitones - Diminished Fifth, Augmented Fourth.
7 Semitones - Perfect Fifth, Diminished Sixth
8 Semitones - Minor Sixth, Augmented Fifth
9 Semitones - Major Sixth, Diminished Seventh
10 Semitones - Minor Seventh, Augmented Sixth
11 Semitones - Major Seventh, Diminished Octave
12 Semitones - Perfect Octave, Augmented Seventh

Without context, the first term I listed should be used, but in context the second term may be used.

Next we move on to the major scale. The major scale contains all major and perfect interval. So it has a Major 2nd, Major 3rd, Perfect 4th, Perfect 5th, Major 6th, and Major 7th. All scales will include Perfect unisons, and octaves, thus these are never listed. For the major scale, We can count the number of semitones from the root note (starting note), and get : 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 11, 12. Usually this is not used, but rather the distance between each consecutive note, which gives us : 2, 2, 1, 2, 2, 2, 1. An interval with a 2 is called a whole tone, and an interval with a 1 is called a semitone. The Formula for the Major Scale is WT - WT - ST - WT - WT - WT - ST. Regardless of which note you start on, you can play this pattern of notes and end up with a major scale in whichever key you chose.

Next is chords of the major scale. Scales are made by stacking consecutive thirds. Basic triads, contain three notes, a root, third and fifth (The fifth is a third above the third). The first chord of a major scale has a major third and perfect fifth. This is represented by 1, 3, 5. The second chord is a minor chord, which has the formula 1, b3, 5. However, as it is the second chord, it would contain the second, fourth and sixth scale degrees. The third chord is minor. The fourth and fifth are major. The sixth is minor. The seventh chord has a minor third, and a diminished fifth, which leads to it being known as a diminished chord (1, b3, b5). A fourth type of chord, the augmented chord, contains a major third, and an augmented fourth - 1, 3, #5. It is not found in a major scale, and requires the use of accidentals. It is two major thirds stacked on each other. The major triad has a major third, and a minor third stacked on top of that. The minor triad has a minor third, and a major third stacked on top of it. The diminished chord has two minor thirds.

Chords are represented by a roman numeral which corresponds to the the scale degree. Major chords are represented by capital letters. Minor chords are represented by small letters. A diminished symbol (º is added to small letters to represent diminished chords. An augmented symbol (+) is added to capital letters to represent augmented chords. The chords of a major scale are:
I, ii, iii, IV, V, vi, viiº

Lastly we have seventh chords. These stack another third on top of the fifth, which results in the interval of a seventh. The seventh chords are as follows:

Diminished 7 : 1, b3, b5, bb7
Half-Diminished 7 : 1, b3, b5, b7
Minor 7 : 1, b3, 5, b7
Minor-Major 7 : 1, b3, 5, 7
Dominant 7 : 1, 3, 5, b7
Major 7: 1, 3, 5, 7
Major 7 Augmented : 1, 3, #5, 7

In a major scale. I is major 7. ii is minor 7. iii is minor 7. IV is major 7. V is dominant 7. vi is minor 7. viiº is half-diminished 7.

The C major seven you were asking about uses a major third, then a minor third, then a major third. This gives the intervals of a major third, perfect fifth, and major seventh. Counting up from C you get the notes: C, E, G, B. That is Cmaj7