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#1
its about that time for me to start recording stuff and i was wondering how i would mix and master my stuff when im done, and i have NO idea what needs to be done?

how did you guys learn? how do i learn?

help?
:]
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Quote by Bentheemo
Thats probably some of the best advice I've ever received on here.
#2
Google is your friend. Most of the mixing and mastering can be done in the software you record with. I recommend Audacity - Decent, simple, free and effective.

EDIT: Mixing involves "putting together" the recorded instrument/vocal tracks. Eg. you have recorded the guitar, drums and bass. They are all recorded on different tracks. You put them together and time it all the proper way.

Mastering involves, well... mastering. Doing all those last-minute corrections, placing the channels and so on...
Quote by bakk
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Last edited by binjajer at Apr 5, 2008,
#4
uh, im getting a Toneport soon, and i use audacity already.
so, yeah.
Ibanez RG7321
Dean Evo Special 7
Agile AL-2000
ESP LTD VB-300
Peavey Vypyr 30
General of the 7 String/ERG Legion

Quote by Bentheemo
Thats probably some of the best advice I've ever received on here.
#5
mixing: setting levels on each audio track.
mastering: fine tuning the overall sound of your track when the mixing is done.

basicly
#6
Im learning all about this stuff in college.
If you wana get serious get a program like Cubase or Logic (if you use a mac get logic).
Mixing is doing anything from EQing to adding effects and getting the volume correct.
Mastering is the really precise stuff thats really complex. I havent got onto it yet in college.
#7
Personally when I record I try and record what I need, and I use loads of overdubs (with it just being me playing).

To master you first need to set EQs and panning stereo. Then mix the tracks with volume adjustments, fading things in and out as needed. Then save/export or record the master.

I expect that's not much help, sorry.
#8
oh, well i never really knew what they meant.
i can mix, most likely, but mastering sounds tricky
Ibanez RG7321
Dean Evo Special 7
Agile AL-2000
ESP LTD VB-300
Peavey Vypyr 30
General of the 7 String/ERG Legion

Quote by Bentheemo
Thats probably some of the best advice I've ever received on here.
#9
Do NOT use the mastering stage to make drastic EQ changes, add effects, do panning, etc.

Mastering should be used for a few thigns and a few things only.

- BASIC EQ. If you need more than 4 bands in the mastering stage, you're doing it wrong.

- Multi-band compression - use this in place of EQing whenever possible. 1 compressor with 4-5 bands is enough for nearly ANY project. Learn how to use it and you can phase out an EQ completey. The fewer not-great quality plugins or racks you must go through the better.

- Single or multi-band limiter - Use to even out tracks. Do NOT use this in the style you would a compressor. Heavy limiting WILL cause waveforms to clip and cause psychoacoustic distortion. You wont think theres any distortion, but it's not distortion like guitar distortion. It's the bad kind.

- Stereo perspective/surround panning. Use to narrow or widen the stereo field/surround perspective depending on your application.


- Exciter/Enhancer - Mainly use for pop hits, fixes minor phase distortion issues and gives the mix an overall sheen.


Do NOT use the mastering stage for adding master reverb. This should be done on the master bus of the project. The only time you should use master reverb in the mastering stage is if youre attempting to make dry, multitracked parts sound like they were all recorded live, in concert, in a church, etc.
#10
Quote by ugmung
uh, im getting a Toneport soon, and i use audacity already.
so, yeah.


The Toneports are ...ok...
As for Audacity, you would be much better off switching to Reaper since you can automate and mix much easier. Audacity is more of an editing program for audio where as Reaper is more for recording and mixing.

Reaper does take a little more time to learn but it is well worth it in the end IMO.

Mixing has some guidelines but you are mostly changing the sound to the way you think it sounds best. Tweaks guide has some tips on mixing and such.

http://www.tweakheadz.com/guide.htm
#11
Quote by moody07747
The Toneports are ...ok...
As for Audacity, you would be much better off switching to Reaper since you can automate and mix much easier. Audacity is more of an editing program for audio where as Reaper is more for recording and mixing.

Reaper does take a little more time to learn but it is well worth it in the end IMO.

Mixing has some guidelines but you are mostly changing the sound to the way you think it sounds best. Tweaks guide has some tips on mixing and such.

http://www.tweakheadz.com/guide.htm


i was kind of looking for something free, for the program that is.
Ibanez RG7321
Dean Evo Special 7
Agile AL-2000
ESP LTD VB-300
Peavey Vypyr 30
General of the 7 String/ERG Legion

Quote by Bentheemo
Thats probably some of the best advice I've ever received on here.
#13
it says you have to buy the license, and its only a free time-trial.
Ibanez RG7321
Dean Evo Special 7
Agile AL-2000
ESP LTD VB-300
Peavey Vypyr 30
General of the 7 String/ERG Legion

Quote by Bentheemo
Thats probably some of the best advice I've ever received on here.
#15
Quote by moody07747
it can be used for years and years without the license. it will just bug you to get it every time you open it.

you SHOULD get the license but it works without it.


oh, thats cool.
ok ill try it out.

am i limited to what i can do with the program without the license?
Ibanez RG7321
Dean Evo Special 7
Agile AL-2000
ESP LTD VB-300
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General of the 7 String/ERG Legion

Quote by Bentheemo
Thats probably some of the best advice I've ever received on here.
Last edited by ugmung at Apr 6, 2008,
#18
Why do people on this forum seem to think that using Reaper without a licence is any better than using torrented software ? I'm not saying whether I agree with it or not, but people get shot down for using torrented software but get told to use Reaper without paying for it.
There is poetry in despair.
#19
Using torrented software is illegal when to own a legal copy you must pay for the program, where as Reaper is legal to use free, it is just the nice thing to do to pay for the license so the team can further develop it.

I think.
#21
Quote by fridge_raider
Oh, I agree, but I just view them as being the same.


whats torrented software?
Ibanez RG7321
Dean Evo Special 7
Agile AL-2000
ESP LTD VB-300
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General of the 7 String/ERG Legion

Quote by Bentheemo
Thats probably some of the best advice I've ever received on here.
#22
Illegally downloaded software or media files, via the download of a torrent file,which connects you to uploaders of the file you want to download. Roughly.
There is poetry in despair.
#23
I torrent alot of programs, but only to see if they're worth paying for int he first place. If I like it, I'll go buy a copy. If I don't, it gets deleted.
#25
Quote by fridge_raider
Illegally downloaded software or media files, via the download of a torrent file,which connects you to uploaders of the file you want to download. Roughly.


can i do that with Mixcraft?
i would like that.
Ibanez RG7321
Dean Evo Special 7
Agile AL-2000
ESP LTD VB-300
Peavey Vypyr 30
General of the 7 String/ERG Legion

Quote by Bentheemo
Thats probably some of the best advice I've ever received on here.
#26
Quote by fridge_raider
That's what they all say


Except in this case it happens to be true
#27
That's what they all say


Haha, I do believe you, but I bet most of the people who say that are bullshitting.

And yes, you could do that with Mixcraft, but if you do ,I wouldn't advertise it around here.
There is poetry in despair.
#29
eh.. i was under the impression that mastering was more about Global EQ's, compression, and volume across an entire album. as well as arranging the songs so that it creates a complete theme, rather than just being a disc with a bunch of songs on it.

yes/no?
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#30
i think mastering is a lot of different things, all done to make your song sound better.
Ibanez RG7321
Dean Evo Special 7
Agile AL-2000
ESP LTD VB-300
Peavey Vypyr 30
General of the 7 String/ERG Legion

Quote by Bentheemo
Thats probably some of the best advice I've ever received on here.
#31
Global EQ's should be kept to minimum, as you should only EQ tracks internally in the context they affect the spectrum, not EQ the spectrum in the context of all the tracks.

Compression, when used, is usually multi-band and emulates a dynamic EQ. It isn't really the type of compression you'd use on say your guitar to even out dynamics.

Volume leveling is often done in mastering, but can be avoided by mixing to at or near a certain -dBu destination.

Song order is more often than not up to the artist, not the mastering engineer.

Sort of yes, sort of no.
#32
Song order might not be up to the mastering engineer, but they will usually put some focus on making sure that the songs flow into each other with the right volume levels etc. when mastering an album.

I think that's what he meant.
There is poetry in despair.
#33
Quote by fridge_raider
Song order might not be up to the mastering engineer, but they will usually put some focus on making sure that the songs flow into each other with the right volume levels etc. when mastering an album.

I think that's what he meant.


pretty much, i remember reading it on an andy sneap interview.. if i ever find the page again, i'll post it up
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#34
As far as I'm concerned mastering should be left to the pros, and you can't really master a single track. Mastering is more about sonically matching songs on an album. Theres nothing you guys are saying that can't be done in the mixing stage.
#35
well, whats the point of making someone else doing it? the only way to learn is to do!
my grandpa told me that.
Ibanez RG7321
Dean Evo Special 7
Agile AL-2000
ESP LTD VB-300
Peavey Vypyr 30
General of the 7 String/ERG Legion

Quote by Bentheemo
Thats probably some of the best advice I've ever received on here.
#36
Of course you can master a single track. During mastering you apply compression, peak limiting, hiss reduction, and so on as well as make it fit together on a CD. Lots of mastering suites (more precisely -- mastering engineers) can really sweeten up a song that has been tracked and mixed by mastering it.
#37
Quote by jndietz
Of course you can master a single track. During mastering you apply compression, peak limiting, hiss reduction, and so on as well as make it fit together on a CD. Lots of mastering suites (more precisely -- mastering engineers) can really sweeten up a song that has been tracked and mixed by mastering it.


that would make my life really easy, where can i get a guy to do that?
lol.
im just curious, im probably not going to get someone to do it.
Ibanez RG7321
Dean Evo Special 7
Agile AL-2000
ESP LTD VB-300
Peavey Vypyr 30
General of the 7 String/ERG Legion

Quote by Bentheemo
Thats probably some of the best advice I've ever received on here.
#38
It's great how helpful you guys are being, but OP needs to understand if he has any serious intention of recording something half-way decent, it would be in his best interests to not only pay for professional recording sessions, but have his work mastered and mixed separately by pros as well, at least until he is confident in his knowledge and has what he feels is adequate enough equipment for recording, etc.

If the OP is just doing this for fun, then feel free to disregard the above. :P
#39
No way to get the hang of it unless you try. You can't track a few times at pro studios, buy a mixer, sit down at home, and say "I now have the knowledge to create tracks as good as those produced in the pro sessions." It takes a lot of time and practice, not a lot of time watching someone else who has already put in both.
#40
That's understandable. It just depends on how serious of a recording project/s he intends to do. If he is serious, as I said, for now he should consider going completely professional while he builds up his own knowledge for future self-recordings (from wherever) He can't learn any semblance of skill required to get an adequate recording in such a short timeframe as it stands. It's a recipe for disaster, if he intends doing this seriously anytime soon.
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