#1
I've become very interested in songs that can tell a story. Things such as "In The Aeroplane Over The Sea" by Neutral Milk Hotel, "John Wayne Gacy Jr." by Sufjan Stevens, etc. Basically when you're trying to write a song that tells a story do you like to create your own, draw from other stories, or what? And if you choose pre-existing stories how do you approach it.

I had highly considered writing a song about the Tokyo fire bombings in WWII from the perspective of a citizen during the night with his lover realizing that the city was burning to the ground and they could do nothing about it.

So yeah, any advice?
#2
i think you should approach it at every angle, then you can get an idea of whats easier for you. the majority of my songs more or less are descriptions of experiences i've had, feelings i've felt, ectc. but i'm like you, i've always appreciated a good story. i've tried sittin down and writing a story song using my imagination. it was the last time i tried it that way. i have a song i wrote that tells a story about a couple named porkchop and trixie, that was the way it started but then i let the words lead me through the rest of it. i just used simple words that were easy to ryhme and it turned out to be a good song. it was more fun for me that way b/c it did not take alot of effort and i didn't even know how it would end. but as far as writing storys about actual events just comes natural. you want the listners to believe no matter where it came from.
#3
Hey, I am doing the same thing with a song called "Supernova" i am creating. Although I myself need some help with that song, lol. I would say that it's always best to use emotions and emotional words, whilst the vocal melodies and singing style should match the true meaning of the song

Take Muse's "Map Of The Problematique" for example. Throughout the song he explains that he "can't get it right" and wants the lonliness to end. Simulataneously, the stlye of the singing lends itself towards a tragedy and awkwardness.

This "matching" should also apply to the riff so you might want a WWII siren in their or something, if you have one.

How to do that is where I am a little baffled...
#4
Quote by lespaulsg09
I've become very interested in songs that can tell a story. Things such as "In The Aeroplane Over The Sea" by Neutral Milk Hotel, "John Wayne Gacy Jr." by Sufjan Stevens, etc. Basically when you're trying to write a song that tells a story do you like to create your own, draw from other stories, or what? And if you choose pre-existing stories how do you approach it.

I had highly considered writing a song about the Tokyo fire bombings in WWII from the perspective of a citizen during the night with his lover realizing that the city was burning to the ground and they could do nothing about it.

So yeah, any advice?


Bruce Springsteen and Tom Petty are the kings of story songs. Listen to them and see how they do it. For Bruce, there are songs like Rosalita which are autobiographical, Thunder Road and Jungleland, which are fictional and there are rumors that he wrote a whole album of songs based on short stories by some author that I've forgotten. Also, I've heard some refer to the Born to Run album as the greatest collection of short stories ever told.