#2
say the name of the note when you play it, its advice from one of my friends
or learn some theory?
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#3
just go up and down each string saying OUT LOUD the notes.

going back down the fretboard is just as important as going up, if not more important
just do that several times a day and you'll be able to name them easier...
#5
Sounds like a little too much? The whole fretboard? I'd start out with some scales :P
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#6
What do you mean by memorize the fretboard?

Do you mean learn all the names of the notes on the fretboard...?

Or do you mean understand the fretboard in terms of scales patterns...?

If it is your goal to just memorize where all the notes are on the fretboard, I would recommend that you pick a note each day and just locate that note everywhere on the fretboard. Focus on the octave relationships and patterns... This is key. See the fretboard in terms of octaves...

If it is your goal to understand the fretboard in terms of scales... I would recommend learning the CAGED fretboard patterns. Do a google search on it and just memorize them. There are only five. These will help you understand the major scale in any key and consequently, any of the modes of the major scale. Getting the CAGED forms under your fingers will take you a looooong way.

Hope that cleared some things up...
#7
Memorize these note locations for E:

1st string open
1st string 12th fret

2nd string 5th fret
2nd string 17th fret

3rd string 9th fret
3rd string 21st fret

4th string 2nd fret
4th string 14th fret

5th string 7th fret
5th string 19th fret

6th string open
6th string 12th fret

Be able to visualize yourself playing them in your mind without a guitar as well as spend actual time going low to high to low on each string. Then repeat the process for the other 11 notes and you'll have them down in no time. If you're guitar has 24 frets you'll add a couple notes locations, if less you'll have less to memorize.

Treat the list like you would a spelling list. Just memorize it.

Good luck.
Last edited by paul_s at Apr 6, 2008,
#8
Don't memorize the fretboard. That is pointless, and won't really help you at all. Learn patterns between the strings and get secure playing anywhere on the fretboard. Learning several patterns and being able to apply them to everything is going to be infinitely more useful than learning the whole fretboad, but being able to apply none of it to your playing. If you concentrate on noticing patterns, you'll gradually learn the fretboard, anyway.
#9
Quote by National_Anthem
Don't memorize the fretboard. That is pointless, and won't really help you at all. Learn patterns between the strings and get secure playing anywhere on the fretboard. Learning several patterns and being able to apply them to everything is going to be infinitely more useful than learning the whole fretboad, but being able to apply none of it to your playing. If you concentrate on noticing patterns, you'll gradually learn the fretboard, anyway.

+1


although u can pick the notes on every string every day....1note/day
#11
Quote by National_Anthem
Don't memorize the fretboard. That is pointless, and won't really help you at all. Learn patterns between the strings and get secure playing anywhere on the fretboard. Learning several patterns and being able to apply them to everything is going to be infinitely more useful than learning the whole fretboad, but being able to apply none of it to your playing. If you concentrate on noticing patterns, you'll gradually learn the fretboard, anyway.
It is NOT pointless!!

Recognizing the patterns of intervals is the only things I can agree with you here.

TS: why you want to learn the fretboard at this point will dictate the best method. There are the more "bookish" classical approach, or more rock-friendly approaches.

http://i205.photobucket.com/albums/bb277/kryptnet/fretboard3-146kb.png Check out this fretboard diagram. That is what you will learn in the classical approach. If that's not for you(understandable), then I would go after the various rock-approaches.
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#12
www.musictheory.net
then click on trainers
then click on guitar trainer

You definetly have to know every note on the fretboard if you want to be serious about the guitar. It takes awhile to learn, but once you do you won't forget it.
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Last edited by 68 Tele at Apr 7, 2008,
#13
Learn some reference points around the fretboard, and go from there.
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#14
What I did was take a 3 fret "box" and have someone with me name a random note and I'd find them within frets 0 to 3. Then we'd move up to 4 to 7 and so on. Taking it one box at a time and having someone to help worked wonders for me.
If you don't have somebody to practice with, the trainers on Musictheory.net are great as posted above me.
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#16
Quote by KryptNet
It is NOT pointless!!

Recognizing the patterns of intervals is the only things I can agree with you here.


What I was getting at was that the exercise of learning the fretboard for the sake of it was pointless, when it is much better to learn it through a) years of practise and b) recognising patterns over the fretboard, especially when it is much more beneficial to do it that way.
#18
Take a scale, say harmonic minor. Learn the scale intervals, and pick a key to use and find those notes on the fretboard. Once you've learned the first position/fretboard pattern in that key, say the notes outloud as you play them. This really helps, and you don't need to memorize the whole fretboard lol, just know the 5th, 7th, 12th frets and go from there.
#19
Quote by Lucky#Slevin
Learn some reference points around the fretboard, and go from there.


What he said.

The way I did it was, starting with the G major scale because we use that a lot with the worship band I'm in, and memorize that scale pattern all the up to the high E string. Then from there you can use your previous knowledge of intervals to start wandering from it, Then I learned the E minor scale all the way up to the high E, and then eventually connected the two scales.

After a While, you start remembering key reference notes and you count off of those to get the notes you want.

Thats how it happened for me, I don't know if it will help you.
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#20
First and foremost, learning the fretboard is something that all serious musicians should do. Hands down, unequivically, needs to be done.

As per recommendations, I'd say download a program (via torrent, would be the best way, methinks) called "Absolute Fretboard". It teaches you, rather, You teach YOURSELF the fretboard, and it just provides goals and a guideline for doing it. When I first started learning the fretboard, I was saying "Okay, well.... Where do I start?" The combinations and possibilities seemed boundless, which really affected my memorization in a negative way, because I'd get sidetracked. This program (which can be used for free if you torrent it, so this isn't an ad) really assisted me. So check it out. The creators of the program also did one for scales (including modes) and also made a speed trainer.
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#21
The way I did it was to first understand that the note patterns on each string are the same; they will just start on a different note. There is also a sharp after every note excluding B and E.

So, if you were to take your low E string, then the notes would be, (starting with OPEN e)
F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#, E. The pattern restarts at the twelfth fret.

So for the A string, you just start with the open A and finish the pattern.