#1
Ok.

I am a college student. A college student with not very much money. Recently, since there's no stability in borrowing others' equipment, I bought myself a nice little $300 SWR LA15 - a 100w 15" + horn combo. It's SWR's handdown to the lower budget people, and I think it's quite the piece of equipment for the price. Very loud for only 100w, nice and fast for a 15", love it.

But I digress.

This guy whose band I'm looking at joining and I were talking today. Well, he plays bass too, but he's the guitarist. He asked me what kind of rig I have. I say "well, I'm kinda strapped for cash, so I've just got this SWR LA15" and he goes "Whoa whoa, you've got a combo? Come on dude, you should get those priorities straight!"

And I've heard this before. Many times.

Point is, I understand the idea of a stack being better. You get to choose the best amplification, cab, maybe two cabs for you, and they can be different brands, mix and match, whatever. BUT, if there's a combo that has the kind of amplification you want AND a good driver setup to go with it, tell me, what's so wrong with that? Is it just elitist bull****, or am I really missing something here?
Les Claypool
Geddy Lee
Robert DeLeo
Flea

Weileder

...Coincidence? I think not.
#3
yea you could have a perfectly dialed in 100w and if anyone complains about it getting droned out, just mic it up.
#4
No way man you are in the right.
Combos can be just as loud as stacks, and you can hook up cabs to them.
Most people who buy half stacks do it just to "have a half stack!" and don't realize that combos are all you need, and they save you money.
Plus, you can bring a combo virtually anywhere, while there may be many times when "dude, i gotta half stack and not enough room"
http://www.guitarnuts.com/amps/myths.php
^read that

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#5
Lots of professional guitarists use combos. You can get ones easily powerful enough for gigs, I believe Keith Richards uses a 30watt combo (but it runs through the p.a ofcourse).

The main difference is stacks usally look cooler, and cost alot more.
#6
stacks are for guys with tight leather pants and long hair
'08 Gretsch White Falcon
'98 Fender USA Deluxe Tele
'79 Greco Les Paul Standard
Airline Stratotone Crafter GAE8

A bunch of funky pedals

Handwired 50 Watt Plexi Lead Clone w/ Orange 4x12
#7
Quote by jthm_guitarist
No way man you are in the right.
Combos can be just as loud as stacks, and you can hook up cabs to them.
Most people who buy half stacks do it just to "have a half stack!" and don't realize that combos are all you need, and they save you money.
Plus, you can bring a combo virtually anywhere, while there may be many times when "dude, i gotta half stack and not enough room"
http://www.guitarnuts.com/amps/myths.php
^read that

Thank you for that, that was a great read.

Ok, you're all basically affirming what I thought, and I appreciate that.

One thing that I did read from that article jthm and do realize is that separate heads do tend to have more features than combo heads. Other than just a little more power, that extra cost a lot of times buys you some more knobs and buttons. I also do realize that a lot of times, cheaper combos will simply be lower quality in design or manufacture than expensive cabs and heads. But again, if it sounds good...

Where's Fitz, I'm pretty sure I remember him bashing combos, I wanna get his opinion on this.
Les Claypool
Geddy Lee
Robert DeLeo
Flea

Weileder

...Coincidence? I think not.
#8
I bought a head and cab because I like to be able to change my mind, this way, if I'm not happy with my cabinet or find another one I like better, I can go get the new one and swap it for the old one without having the cabinet still hanging off the head like in a combo.

If you find a combo with speakers that you like and you are perfectly happy with though, they are just as good as a head/cab setup.

Oh yeah also, combos are heavier as they are all in on box, head/cab setups are easier to carry in that respect (but still not light!).
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#9
Combos are fine for a typical clean-ish bass sound.

Stacks are much better for layering subtle effects and say side-chaining lite distortion onto your bass sound. Though SansAmp Bass Drive DIed into the P.A. probably gets as good a sound.
#10
Quote by Regression
Lots of professional guitarists use combos. You can get ones easily powerful enough for gigs, I believe Keith Richards uses a 30watt combo (but it runs through the p.a ofcourse).

The main difference is stacks usally look cooler, and cost alot more.


I heard something on this also, It may have been the guy from the eagles of death metal, with the moustashe, saying he just has a valve combo through the PA, cos big stacks can sound empty and tinny, or something...

Personally (and with no sound engineering experience) I would say 100w is more than enough for normal, acoustic drum kit style levels.
#11
100 watts is enough
you can be heared over a drummer with 15 watts(of course is not te best idea but it works)
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Squier VM p-bass(i chosed it over a fender!!!) with quarter pounder and gotoh 201!!
fender MIM P bass
epiphone SG 400
#12
Quote by indie-bassist
I bought a head and cab because I like to be able to change my mind, this way, if I'm not happy with my cabinet or find another one I like better, I can go get the new one and swap it for the old one without having the cabinet still hanging off the head like in a combo.

If you find a combo with speakers that you like and you are perfectly happy with though, they are just as good as a head/cab setup.

Oh yeah also, combos are heavier as they are all in on box, head/cab setups are easier to carry in that respect (but still not light!).


+1 on all of this.

Just as there are idiots who think stacks are cooler and therefore better. There's a bunch of psuedo-knowitalls who think combos are the only way.

Both are wrong, use whatever works for you. I currently have a head and 2x12 setup and I like it because it's easier to move in a greater number of trips. As well as I can just take my head to gigs if a backline is supplied and as indie said I can mix and match my setup.

Before this I had a 4x10 combo rig, which while a decent amp was heavy and awkward to move, although it sounded fine.

Also, some setups only come in stack configurations.

Go with what works for you.
Gear

Fender Geddy Lee Jazz
Fender MIA Precision
Musicman Bongo
Boss TU-2
EBS TD650
EBS ProLine 2x10 x 2
#13
Quote by litus
you can be heared over a drummer with 15 watts(of course is not te best idea but it works)


No, 15 watts can not be heard. I've tried multiple amps running at 20-40 watts and those couldn't even be heard AT ALL. And the drummer wasn't even that loud. Minimum to be even slightly heard is about 60.. so like a 1x12. I just can't see a 1x8 pushing enough air to be heard over a drummer lol..
Gear:

Basses:
2008 American Standard Fender Jazz
Ibanez SRX300
Amp(s):
Ashdown MAG 300 C410T + 1x15
Effects:
SansAmp 3-Channel Bass Driver D.I.
#15
Quote by indie-bassist

Oh yeah also, combos are heavier as they are all in on box, head/cab setups are easier to carry in that respect (but still not light!).

this is the "meat and potatos" of the subject. stacks tend to be easier to move, only because they seperate the weight into smaller pieces. a high-end combo will sound just as good, as it's "stacked" brethren.
#16
Combos=convenience
Head/cab=greater choice in parts

/thread
-Instruments-
Squier frankenbass
LTD Deluxe EC-1000 in Vintage Black
1960's Banjuke
#17
Quote by kranoscorp
Combos=convenience
Head/cab=greater choice in parts

/thread


Nailed it.