#1
yup, you guessed it ^ my vintage v400 sounds lovely but plays like POO. i was thinking to take the sticky finish of the neck and filing the fretas down and sanding down the bridge to make it all play better. is this a reasonably reasonable thing to do to a guitar like this or should i pay a luthier to do it for me?
#2
Quote by JoelTheShredder
yup, you guessed it ^ my vintage v400 sounds lovely but plays like POO. i was thinking to take the sticky finish of the neck and filing the fretas down and sanding down the bridge to make it all play better. is this a reasonably reasonable thing to do to a guitar like this or should i pay a luthier to do it for me?

Personally, I'd just do it yourself. There isn't a whole lot on that guitar that you can mess up, since it's just Vintage. The neck is nato, the sides and back are nato laminate, etc. Why do you need to sand the bridge down, though? Do you mean the saddle?

Also, I wouldn't file the frets down. What were you thinking of doing if you're refinishing the neck? Plan everything out, first.
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
#3
well yeah i meant the saddle, that should bring the action down. the frets are just dirty so i wanted to give a fret dress and i wanna take the finish off the neck so it is smoother.
#4
Quote by JoelTheShredder
well yeah i meant the saddle, that should bring the action down. the frets are just dirty so i wanted to give a fret dress and i wanna take the finish off the neck so it is smoother.

Entirely doable. One recommendation: try to weigh on which side the action is worst (being closer to the nut or saddle). You might need to make only a slight adjustment to the nut and saddle rather than a drastic adjustment to the saddle.
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
#5
I assume your talking about the back of the neck. Why not just buff it out with some #000 steel wool? It's fine enough that it won't put any major scratches in the existing finish, and it'll smooth things out nicely. You can use it for the fretboard and frets also, just go with the grain is all. Sanding down the bottom of the bridge saddle is THE way to lower action on an acoustic, but check other things first, like neck relief, and nut slot depth to make sure those are in line. They all interact to a degree, so it's best to start at the beginning if you want to undertake a job like this.
#6
Quote by LeftyDave
I assume your talking about the back of the neck. Why not just buff it out with some #000 steel wool? It's fine enough that it won't put any major scratches in the existing finish, and it'll smooth things out nicely. You can use it for the fretboard and frets also, just go with the grain is all. Sanding down the bottom of the bridge saddle is THE way to lower action on an acoustic, but check other things first, like neck relief, and nut slot depth to make sure those are in line. They all interact to a degree, so it's best to start at the beginning if you want to undertake a job like this.

nice. thanks bro :d
#7
Quote by Chad48309
Entirely doable. One recommendation: try to weigh on which side the action is worst (being closer to the nut or saddle). You might need to make only a slight adjustment to the nut and saddle rather than a drastic adjustment to the saddle.

yup. its defiantly the saddle not the nut. thanks for all the help man.