#1
Hello everyone, this is my first post and this looks like a good place so it would be awesome to hear some good replies to this.

I like to use my gibson les pau standardl through the mesa/boogie dual rectifier, I absolutely love the tones I can get with my setup. I am into all sorts of different music, but lately I have joined something more along the lines of a hardcore band.

My main problem is that the music calls for a lot of distortion, and when I crank up the gain setting I get the good old ear-splitting feedback. I am wondering if I should buy a feedback eliminator to run through the effects loop perhaps. What are good brands and models for this sort of device? Also I would really like to not have the problem of having regular high pitched notes I play on the guitar being blocked out.

I am also considering getting an EMG 81 pickup for the bridge position as I think this might enhance the distortion quality. I have no idea but would anyone know whether this would have any sort of effect on feedback if any? I do know that the distortion quality will probably be better compared to the standard gibson burstbucker pickup I already have.

Thanks in advance for any informative replies I might get!
#3
I hear that the ISP decimator is a really good noise gate.. but look around and see what you can find.

And do you really want that EMG 81? It's going to require some routing, and you won't be able to play decent cleans. Just keep that in consideration.

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#5
Quote by acdcrocks0323
Face away from the amp and stand as far away from it as possible. An ISP Decimator will work better but those can be pricey kind of. Still worth the $110 it costs.



My whole rig altogether cost somewhere around 4 grand, an extra 110 bucks would be a piece of cake.

As for the EMG pickups, I'm still not totally sure, it is just something I've been thinking about, I'm actually pretty damn content with the tone and chug that I get, just this feedback is driving me nuts and putting holes in everyone's eardrums!
#7
The decimator seems pretty cool, it has a pretty sick name to it too... "the decimator".

I apologize if I sounded like a prick in my last post.

Other than that, are there any good youtube videos that demonstrate the power of this device when put up against some really nasty feedback? I looked up but I only really found videos of guys using it while playing the clean channel, or with no feedback to begin with pretty much.
#8
Apparantly the ISP DEcimator is the way to go. Ive only had experiences with the Boss NS-2 and MXR NOise gate. Whatever you do, dont get the MXR, since you can easily notice the change in tone when its engaged. From what I hear the ISP is the truest noise gate you can get. And at $120 its a steal.
Gear:
ESP/LTD EC1000 (w/ EMG 81 and 60)
ESP/LTD H500 (w/SD Custom 5 and 59)
Fender MIM Strat (basically my first. Never play it.)
Traynor YCV80 4x10
Peavey 6505 2x12 combo

Half Stacks are OVER-Rated
#9
Hey, what about the ISP decimator G-string. That pedal is more expensive, but I'm not sure why, anyone care to explain?

Something to do with being able to hook it up both before guitar signal and in effects loop?

I I can get a ridiculous amount of chugging distortion without hearing the sqeaul I'll be very happy.
Last edited by Blue Flames at Apr 8, 2008,
#10
Quote by Blue Flames
The decimator seems pretty cool, it has a pretty sick name to it too... "the decimator".


The name is indeed pretty cool, but curiously enough, "Decimate" means to "lower by one tenth" or something along those lines.

...maybe a bit off-topic, yes.
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#11
The G String is a solid halfway point between the original Decimator pedal and the ProRackG rackmount unit. The Pedal is a single channel of noise reduction that you can place either before the amp or in the loop. The ProRackG is a dual channel unit that goes in both places and tracks the signal from the first channel to the second channel. The G String is a single channel unit that goes in the effects loop that tracks the signal from before the amp.

If you don't mind paying for it, the ProRackG is amazing. Outside of that the pedal versions are solid and excellent at what they do.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#12
The G string does indeed go in front of the amp and into the effects loop. It's supposed to deal with cancelling out a little more hum and also it doesn't require you to change your decimator settings when you change the volume of your amp (which isn't a major issue trust me). So if you have extra cash and don't mind the mess of patch cords it's probably your best bet.

I personally just got the normal decimator and I think it works amazing. Doesn't completely cancel all the hum but that's probably a grounding issue or something I'm too lazy to figure out. But it completely got rid of all feedback I was getting and I'm very happy with it.
#13
Also note that i don't think wiring an active pickup (such as an EMG) in only one position - the bridge, in your case, is a simple task. Mixing actives and passives requires re-routing i think.
Yeah, i'll second any of the noisegate options though The Deimator is a good choice
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#14
Quote by guitarded88
The G string does indeed go in front of the amp and into the effects loop.

Just for the sake of clarification, know that while it does technically "go" in both places, the part of it that sits in front of the amp offers no noise reduction, it only provides a reference so that the part in the effects loop can accurately track the guitar signal.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#15
Thanks a lot for the help guys, I think I'll be going with the regular decimator pedal...

But yeah thanks again for being so informative.
#16
dude dont be so quick to spend money. if you are close to your amp or facing it it will feedback. a dual rec with the gain cranked is still not enough gain to generate any feed back that cant be self prevented (aka without a pedal). watch where your standing keep your fingers on the strings when your not playing and you should be good.
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#17
Quote by hoondog
dude dont be so quick to spend money. if you are close to your amp or facing it it will feedback. a dual rec with the gain cranked is still not enough gain to generate any feed back that cant be self prevented (aka without a pedal). watch where your standing keep your fingers on the strings when your not playing and you should be good.


I have tried standing away from my amp and I still get a high pitched sqeaul even when my fingers are on the strings. This has more to do with the fact that I'm using a les paul instead of a more metal-oriented sort of guitar like say an ESP or an Ibanez.
#18
I have tried standing away from my amp and I still get a high pitched sqeaul even when my fingers are on the strings. This has more to do with the fact that I'm using a les paul instead of a more metal-oriented sort of guitar like say an ESP or an Ibanez.


No. The guitar-itself will not influence feedback. It is wood (mostly).


It is possible the source of your feedback is the pickups in your Les Paul. I recall, somewhere in my memory, that is a particular issue with some older Gibson pickups (?), perhaps (?). Something along the lines of the pickups not being shielded (or such) correctly. But going up to an EMG is probably not 'the solution',..., though I think changing out your pickup (to anything) will likely resolve your issue.

I play my high-gain loud Recto with an Ibanez loaded with low-output PAFs. No feedback. Ever. In fact... I try sometimes, and it is hard to get, lol...