#1
So I have a chord progression Bb5-D#m-F#m-Am. How would I solo over something like this if it doesn't really fit into the major scale(or any other common scale). I know I should use focus on chord tones and throw in some other notes but when something falls outside of the major scale I don't know what notes that aren't in the chords to use.
#2
You could go by just what feels right. Just play what you think goes best!

Or...

Use a modal *I think that's the right word* progression, which is basically just change key with each chord. I think.

I deeply regret the 6661 in my username. Siiiigh. Damn you, 14 year old me, you edgy little bastard.
#4
You could try b minor/major pentatonic maybe...or if it's not b minor just whatever key the song is in. Then you don't have to change keys with each chord change
#6
^I will address that.

Quote by Carl6661
You could go by just what feels right. Just play what you think goes best!
You should always do that!


Quote by Carl6661
Use a modal *I think that's the right word* progression, which is basically just change key with each chord. I think.

You're on to something, but a modal progression would be something like Dm7 G7 where the two chord vamp clearly want to be in D Dorian and not resolve to C major.

What you mean is to approach each chord as an island. Normally, you would have a progression like C F G F, where every chord fits nicely in C major and you just get in C major mode and go. However, in jazz, a lot of progressions aren't this simple, so the soloist will approach each chord independently (not completely, you want your phrases to sound good after the previous phrase). So, while you could use C major over that whole progression, you could also play C Mixo over the C, F Phrygian Dominant over F, and G Lydian over G. This would not be a common appraoch to a simple progression and will likely have disasterous results, but for something fairly chromatic with no clear home base, this technique could work. I suggest using various minor scales with the roots being whatever the underneath chord is.
#7
Chord tones absolutely. Try to use each chord as its own key as well, and come up with a scale accordingly. Don't however, necessarily use the most obvious choice. For instance, while a D# minor scale would be great over that D#m, try a D# dorian or phrygian scale, or any scale that has the chord tones. Additionally, think of any common tones that some chords will have and any scales that could fit. For instance, a D# diminished(half-whole) scale could work over the D#m, F#m, and Am. I'm actually not sure how that's sound, and I'd avoid using the respective major thirds of each chord that are in that scale, but I'm just throwing ideas out there.