#1
Hi.

so, I've been re-listening throuhg all my "unplugged" albums. I've notice that the solos and lead on the Godsmack unplugged and the Alice in Chains Unplugged are... spectacular. One of the things I like so much is the tone they have. So, the question: How are they getting such a bright twangy, treble-y tone. Are they using a certain picking technique? because I notice that their strumming sounds about the same as what I can do... but their leads sound so crisp etc. So is it just the fact that their guitars probably cost 20x mine? or are they doing some technique I should learn?

Thanks,

-zc
#2
The type of strings may be part of it. Gauge/newness/coating, etc...
Real eyes realise real lies.
#3
i think it might have to do with them using electric acoustics and plugging into an amp/mixer sort of thing rather than mic recording the acoustic. Not 100% sure though.
#4
Quote by Zeh
The type of strings may be part of it. Gauge/newness/coating, etc...


I agree. it's probably the strings. I think that its nickel strings tht sound really good.
SoCalDirtDragon
#5
You also might want to consider that they might be picking closer to the bridge. In the AIC one they are picking closer to the bridge instead of right over the soundhole.
#6
Quote by Nacho Cheese!
You also might want to consider that they might be picking closer to the bridge. In the AIC one they are picking closer to the bridge instead of right over the soundhole.


Yeah i had thought of that, but it sounds a little different than what I get. Theirs is still a little more crisp and generally... better sounding.

As far as nickel strings... is there any type of adjustment I'd have to make if I switch to those? I'd use the same gauges as I've been using for bronze, at least in theory.

Also, any recommendations for strings? I use the .12 Martin Bronzes (red box) now, since that is what the guitar shop guy gave me when I first bought my guitar... I've never really experimented with strings. What should I try?
#7
I wouldn't use nickel strings on an acoustic guitar. Strings will make a fair amount of difference in how your guitar sounds. If you're looking for something brighter, I'd check out Elixirs. They are coated (which means they'll last about twice as long, or thats about what i figure), and they are about as bright as you can get.

With that said, I think most of what you're hearing is the tweaking of the sound engineers...if you know what I mean. I would guess a lot of that tone probably came from the mixing and EQing.

Last thing, I'm not sure what kind of acoustic you are playing, but once you start pumping more money into your guitars, you're granted a clearer, more balanced tone. I find a lot of lower end guitars tend to be fairly muddy due to their materials and construction.

Gear:
Partscaster/Tele into a bunch of pedals, a Maz 18 head, and a Z Best cab.
#8
It's also worth noting that the solos probably sound that way because the guitarists in question have been practicing for years to get those specific tones. I'm sure the sound engineers have a lot to do with it, but most of what produces tone comes from your hands.
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
Woods Acoustic
-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
Hartke HA2500
Fender Bassman 410H
Play what you love, love what you play
#9
Quote by Garou1911
It's also worth noting that the solos probably sound that way because the guitarists in question have been practicing for years to get those specific tones. I'm sure the sound engineers have a lot to do with it, but most of what produces tone comes from your hands.


YEah, that's part of what i figured as well.

and thanks Jon. Yeah, I'm playing a POS, and I wasn't expecting perfection, just wondering if there was something I could do to get that tone, I think it would sound wonderful for some free-form blues soloing, a real biting sound. I am going to get some new strings tomorrow these are fairly old (which isn't helping) I'll check into those elixirs.

Thanks everyone.