#1
I'm thinking that it means that it is a bigger than average acoustic. Is this true? A guitar I'm looking at is $100 more as a jumbo than the one that isn't. Thanks!
#2
yeah its bigger, and if Im not mistaken it also has a louder, more defined tone due to its larger size...
Gear:

Jackson dk2m
MIM strat
peavey jsx 2x12 combo
Recording King RDC-26
Digitch RP1000
Crybaby 535Q
#3
Quote by spiroth10
yeah its bigger, and if Im not mistaken it also has a louder, more defined tone due to its larger size...


+1
My Gear:
Jay Turser Warlock
Baraccuda Strat
Takamine EG523SC
Samick Acoustic
Vox AD50VT
Boss DS-1
Boss CS-3
Dunlop Crybaby Wah
#4
jumbo means big.

jumbo acoustic guitars are ones that are shaped like a figure of 8. Like oO
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#6
biger = louder
if everything else is the same
My Gear

Squier VM p-bass(i chosed it over a fender!!!) with quarter pounder and gotoh 201!!
fender MIM P bass
epiphone SG 400
#8
they might be a bit harder for you to play if you find wrapping your arms around them to be difficult. they're usually around 5 inches in thickness, which is quite large.

jumbos are generally very loud, with a unique tone to them. there's more space inside the guitar, so as the air vibrates, it creates a more "airy" kind of sound. well... to my ears anyway.
#9
sigh. If you guys aren't sure, please be careful with your posting. What's been said here isn't really correct...

from the FAQ:
There Are Three Basic Sizes

Parlor(000)- Parlour guitars are narrow at the shoulders, narrow at the waist, and conspicuously smaller than the other styles of acoustic guitars.. Their diminutive size means the sound is "weaker" as well. However parlour guitars are often noted for their velvety tone, and many people find the size and shape easier to handle. Parlours were popular with many early blues players, and are still the axe of choice among many fingerstyle players.


Dreadnaught- Dreadnoughts are probably the most popular style of acoustic guitars because of their versatility. Their big bodies and strong sound make them popular with everyone from "Kumbaya" strummers to unplugged rockers to flat-picking country kickers. Dreadnoughts have square shoulders on the upper and lower bouts, and are fairly wide at the waist. They project a loud, full sound when strummed or picked.

Jumbo- Jumbo acoustics have gained more fans in recent years, reviving a size popular in jazz's pre-electric days. Slope-shouldered and narrow-waisted, jumbos feature a lot of body behind the bridge, which gives these guitars a nice boost on the bottom end and a big, round tone. A well-made jumbo can project almost as strongly as a dreadnought and still have the warmth and evenness of a concert acoustic.

Gear:
Partscaster/Tele into a bunch of pedals, a Maz 18 head, and a Z Best cab.
#10
^ Yes, jumbo is a body style. They tend to project the lower end better, but not always. I think they sound like garbage, but it's just an opinion.
#11
I played an Alvarez jumbo once, I liked it, but, it wasn't all that different than my Alvarez dreadnought. Midrange tones seemed slightly mellower, not as loud. Bass was smooth and loud, but so is my dreadnought, but my dreadnought sounds exceptional down low, and I think this is the norm for jumbos. I used to not like big guitars but now that I'm used to my dreadnought, the jumbo didn't seem too big at all.
#12
Quote by GC Shred Off
^ Yes, jumbo is a body style. They tend to project the lower end better, but not always. I think they sound like garbage, but it's just an opinion.

Same could be said for any guitar. It's a matter of quality, as with most things. Of all Gibson Jumbos I've played, I have yet to find one that wasn't worth the price tag.
Sincerely, Chad.
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#13
is a Gibson J-45 a jumbo? because i played one and did not enjoy any part of it at all... i dont know why. i was kinda disappointed because i heard so many good things about it. it was used and marked down from $2000 or so if im not mistaken. then i played a Martin D-16 and enjoyed that a lot, hahaha.
#14
Quote by captivate
is a Gibson J-45 a jumbo?


Depends on who you ask. They call it a jumbo, hence the "J", but it's mostly for historical reasons. Back in the day, Martin made this big-ass guitar so big that they named it after a battleship, which is where the term "dreadnought" comes from. This was a Martin thing, so Gibson wasn't going to name theirs that. But, they did make a big one, about the same size and shape, and simply called it their "jumbo" line, but it's pretty much the same thing as a dreadnought.

However, nowadays, usually jumbo denotes something even bigger, yet another shape, and they have a big round bottom to them. Do a search on musician's friend for "gibson jumbo", the ones that look like dreadnoughts (common guitar shape) are the old "jumbo" sizes, the ones that look much rounder with a fatter bottom are the new jumbos.
#15
Quote by corndogggy

However, nowadays, usually jumbo denotes something even bigger, yet another shape, and they have a big round bottom to them. Do a search on musician's friend for "gibson jumbo", the ones that look like dreadnoughts (common guitar shape) are the old "jumbo" sizes, the ones that look much rounder with a fatter bottom are the new jumbos.

Often referred to as "super jumbo."
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
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