#1
so i do music theory in school, and my teacher says that intervals are alot better to learn than notes. i asked my guitar teacher, she says that you should learn notes.

whenever i look at the fretboard though intervals seem to take over, and the entire fretboard seems to make more sense in intervals rather than notes. so instead of using notes would i get away with intervals?
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Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
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along with fire escape routes...

#2
intervals ftw
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#3
what do they mean by learning notes? Do they mean learn what the notes sound like, or where they are on the fretboard? I wouldnt say notes and intervals are opposites, learning one will help you with the other...intervals in general can be really helpful once you know them and the sound you get out of them though, so id say do that.
#4
You have to use both to a certain extent. But basically whatever you find easiest to work with; as you become more familiar with one, the other will develop.
#5
i mean like learn the notes in the fretboard, but i don't see notes when i look at the fretboard i see intervals. and so far it has not hindered my learning, except for my teacher having to take an extra minute to translate what she's talking about into intervals.
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#6
Learn both.

If you have a chord progression that goes Em G Am C D and you want to follow the chords by apreggiating them then I find it best to think in terms of notes to find the root of the chord, then intervals from that root to play the arpeggio.

So I think E 1 b3 5, G 1 3 5, A 1 b3 5, C 1 3 5, D 1 3 5
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#7
i thought about my question a bit, and i came to the conclusion that i want my solos to go beyond the pentatonics, so instead of actually saying i'm learning the modes, i'm going to do this right and learn the notes not the boxes. my first steps into a new world.
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#9
Notes. You got to understand the concept of Intervals and Key theory. But when you start to break down how to use the modes, "interval tones".... 3rd, 5th, Flat 7th.....ect. You're going to need to know where all the notes are on the fretboard.

That way when constructing leads or improving you know where your accent points are within each scale/mode.

It is kind of a toss up....... one needs the other. But then again I grew up playing Piano and Sax. So I already knew interval and note/tone theory and really just needed to learn note-to-fret location and chord shapes to get a jump start on learning guitar.
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