#1
I was thinking this morning about how a player of my level would "pan out" in the 1950's, I mean no offense to Chuck Berry etc. etc. but I have seen videos right here on this site with kids that can play 100 times better. It amazes me how we have evolved, I mean look at motocross, skateboarding, BMX, whatever, imagine if these kids went back to the 50s, people would think they were supernatural. Remember in "Back to the future" when Michael J. Fox went back in time and played at the prom or what ever? Just thinking out loud here, but hats off to all of you young guys that have taken guitar to the next level, I'm a decent blues guitarist, but I know that there are those of you that are half my age and can play circles around me. Now all we need to do is invent a time machine, go back in time and become rock stars!
#2
like you said.. we evolved.. and so did music. you'll never know if people in the 30's/40's/50's/60's70's would have liked the music nowadays. I know there are people alive from those times today and like the music now but i honestly dont think that people would like a transition from Elvis to Greenday. but thats just my opinon.

edit: or Elvis to shred, since you were talking about 'playing ability'
Quote by joshjhasarrived
Little does the government suspect that it's funds are being rapidly drained through funding infinite free cardboard boxes to bored teenagers on an internet forum.
Last edited by victoryaloy at Apr 7, 2008,
#3
like Syndrome said in The Incredibles... "When everyone's a superhero... no one is."

by that i mean, sure, there are alot of great guitarists out there, but now, because there are so many of them, it all seems so much less impressive. when those guitarists from the 50's-80's first arose, they were the first of their kind (generally), so naturally they were more "impressive" and unique than guitarists these days. it will be really hard to innovate like those early guitarists did.
Gear

Gibson Shred-X Explorer
Epiphone Negative Explorer w/ EMG 80/60
ESP LTD EC QM200
Ibanez RG321 w/ EMG 81/60

Peavey 5150
Mesa Boogie 4x12 Slant cab

http://www.delusionsof.com
Last edited by ConstableMurtis at Apr 7, 2008,
#4
Yea, there has definately been an evolution in music. But then again, look at the popularity of the guitar now. Every-body and his brother now has a guitar, so it's only natural for the talent pool to increase.
#5
Quote by The Jomo
I mean no offense to Chuck Berry etc. etc. but I have seen videos right here on this site with kids that can play 100 times better.


You've seen videos here of people playing Rock N' Roll/Rhythm and Blues better than Chuck Berry? Where? I'd really really like to see that, because I think it's BS.
#7
Quote by GoDrex
You've seen videos here of people playing Rock N' Roll/Rhythm and Blues better than Chuck Berry? Where? I'd really really like to see that, because I think it's BS.


Good point.
Quote by allislost
I would say that aetherspear speaks nothing but the truth.
UG Blues Group
UG Reggae & Dub Group
Need Professional Mixing for cheap? Need Vinyl to Digital Transfers? PM Me.
#8
^ yeah, i think he's referring more to ones technical ability than just the all around "bad assness" of chuck berry. yes there are kids out there that are technically more proficient than him but really you can't cop to that guys feel man.
#9
it's pretty simple. We're able to take from these examples and expand. I do not think the mentality of a guitar player has evolved at all. As in I don't think guitar players now practice more or are more talented or more determined then someone in the 50's.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#10
Quote by z4twenny
^ yeah, i think he's referring more to ones technical ability than just the all around "bad assness" of chuck berry. yes there are kids out there that are technically more proficient than him but really you can't cop to that guys feel man.

Yeah, I think you read into what I meant, thank you. It's hard to express what you mean on the web sometimes. I grew up wanting to play like Chuck and I'm not talking trash about him at all. I'll take a guitar player that plays by "feelings" over technique any day.
I'm talking about skill level here, I'm talking about kids that can fly up and down the neck at lightning speed and not miss a note.
#11
Quote by The Jomo
I was thinking this morning about how a player of my level would "pan out" in the 1950's, I mean no offense to Chuck Berry etc. etc. but I have seen videos right here on this site with kids that can play 100 times better. It amazes me how we have evolved, I mean look at motocross, skateboarding, BMX, whatever, imagine if these kids went back to the 50s, people would think they were supernatural. Remember in "Back to the future" when Michael J. Fox went back in time and played at the prom or what ever? Just thinking out loud here, but hats off to all of you young guys that have taken guitar to the next level, I'm a decent blues guitarist, but I know that there are those of you that are half my age and can play circles around me. Now all we need to do is invent a time machine, go back in time and become rock stars!


Then and again look at player like Django Reindhart and composers like Bach.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#12
Yea thats true, but there are also tons of great players with lots of knowledge to offer (i.e. this forum) Also I love how easy it is to find a good jam nowadays. Maybe if you are really interested in "making it big," its worse now, but if you just want to play with people its great imo.
Standard Fender Telecaster
Fender Blues Jr
Ibz10
#13
I kinda know what you mean, but to be fair, virtuosity is hardly a new concept. If you're strictly speaking about pop music then I guess peoples tastes change. As you point out, the technical ability of guitarists in the early days of pop (such as the 1950s) were not seen as important, whereas in the 1980s it was seen as important again.

The 90s can also be seen as another time where the importance of being technically great at playing guitar was toned down. I also imagine, that if these guitarist were around then there would probaby very few people that care.

Good topic though.
#14
"People believe that by playing faster and creating new playing techniques you can progress forward, but then they realize that emotionally they don't progress at all. They transmit nothing to the people listening and they stay at where Hendrix was three decades ago." - John Frusciante

Qft.
Quote by Ed O'Brien
“It’s not genius. It’s just that if you want something good to come out of something, you have to put in a lot of effort. That involves a lot of hard work, and a lot of blood, sweat and tears sometimes.”

http://urbanscarecrow.bandcamp.com/
#15
Quote by KryptNet
it's pretty simple. We're able to take from these examples and expand. I do not think the mentality of a guitar player has evolved at all. As in I don't think guitar players now practice more or are more talented or more determined then someone in the 50's.


+1

Quote by radiantmoon
Then and again look at player like Django Reindhart and composers like Bach.


+1


guitar playing has evolved... music has evolved. Its by no means better, its just different.
shred is gaudy music
#17
Yeah, Les=awesomeness! Can't deny that and again I'm not knocking anyone and thanks to the discussing participators that aren't calling "BS" on a simple discussion.
I guess these things in life like I said earlier, from bicycles to guitars, that we have improved on, decade after decade just interests me. Theoretically, my son should be schooling me by the time he's drinking age.
#18
Quote by Damascus
"People believe that by playing faster and creating new playing techniques you can progress forward, but then they realize that emotionally they don't progress at all. They transmit nothing to the people listening and they stay at where Hendrix was three decades ago." - John Frusciante

Qft.

And who is he to say that fast playing transmits nothing to the listener? It's all subjective. I personally love fast playing - if John Frusciante wants to tell me, for example, that the solo in For The Love Of God transmits no emotion, I'll be happy to tell him that in my opinion he's wrong.
#19
Quote by :-D
And who is he to say that fast playing transmits nothing to the listener? It's all subjective. I personally love fast playing - if John Frusciante wants to tell me, for example, that the solo in For The Love Of God transmits no emotion, I'll be happy to tell him that in my opinion he's wrong.

I actually feel nothing from that solo emotionally. It feels contrived to me. I agree with you though, that is my opinion.... or at least my perception of whats going on.

Didnt he like fast for a few days before playing that? I thought I read that somewhere. Which also leads to my perception of contrived emotion.

again, what I just said agrees with your point. Emotion is emotion regardless of speed.
shred is gaudy music
#20
Quote by GuitarMunky
I actually feel nothing from that solo emotionally. It feels contrived to me. I agree with you though, that is my opinion.... or at least my perception of whats going on.

Didnt he like fast for a few days before playing that? I thought I read that somewhere. Which also leads to my perception of contrived emotion.

He fasted and meditated for ten days apparently, and recorded on the fourth day (straight from Wiki). That's exactly my point though, that different people take different things away from the same music, so he can't just say that progressing technically will hold someone back from playing in an emotionally appealing way to anybody. You backed that up perfectly.

Did you throw that last line in to avoid another argument?
#21
And who is he to say that fast playing transmits nothing to the listener?

I think you missed the point of the quote.

I think he means that some people see the only measure of a guitarist as how fast he can play. They obsess over technique to become better, and lose sight of the purpose of music. Frusciante is saying you should focus on connecting with the music emotionally and try to be more expressive.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#22
Quote by Ænimus Prime
I think you missed the point of the quote.

I think he means that some people see the only measure of a guitarist as how fast he can play. They obsess over technique to become better, and lose sight of the purpose of music. Frusciante is saying you should focus on connecting with the music emotionally and try to be more expressive.

If that's the point of the quote, then yes, that's good advice. I disagree with the latter half of that, however; technical prowess does not prevent you from emotionally connecting with the music. I know that's not what you're trying to say, I just wanted to clear that up.
#23
Quote by :-D
He fasted and meditated for ten days apparently, and recorded on the fourth day (straight from Wiki). That's exactly my point though, that different people take different things away from the same music, so he can't just say that progressing technically will hold someone back from playing in an emotionally appealing way to anybody. You backed that up perfectly.

Did you throw that last line in to avoid another argument?


Cool, I meant to back it up because I agree.

no I threw that last line in there to explain why I feel its contrived. I feel that way about most of that CD actually.... emotion wise it feels contrived to me. As much as I like Vai.... I dont really enjoy listening to much of that album, and I've tried many times. I just cant through it..... it makes me feel .... nothing.

but like I was saying... thats my perception.
shred is gaudy music