#1
Quote by Website
Symptoms a Tube is Dying:

Amps usually come with fuses. When a tube reaches the end of it's lifespan they become ineficient and need to draw more power from the wall in order to keep up. Eventually, they draw so much power that you'll most likely blow a fuse. If you change your fuse and it breaks again, chances are your tubes need replacing. Sometimes one or several tubes will pop and die completely when the fuse breaks. Putting in a stronger fuse can dammage your amp so don't do it!

Sometimes your amp will develop a low rumble or high whistling noise that gets worse as the volume is increased, even if nothing is plugged in to an input jack. Eventually, the squeal will get so loud that it will overpower your playing. That noise is called "microphony" and it's a sign that your smaller, preamp tubes need to be changed soon. The constant low rumble occurs when your power tubes succumb to microphony. The low rumble occurs very rarely, usually they start blowing fuses first.

The good news about tubes is that they usually fail in sequence. If your first preamp tube starts to microphony, you may be able to temporarily fix the problem by changing the order of the preamp tubes. The first tube in the chain bears the brunt of your playing more than the others. This fix is purely temporary and you should still get new tubes as soon as you can.

If a power tube has a slight blue or purple glow it does not mean that the valve is necessarily faulty.


My amp blew a fuse and I found this site while troubleshooting. Is the part about blowing fuses true?
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#2
Yeah it is, our guitarists marshall did it loads till he replaced the tubes


Quote by MightyAl
How do you physically download an album? Like run your computer off a dynamo on an exercise bike?
#3
It is the truth. But also note that spent tubes aren't the only reason a fuse can blow.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#4
Quote by Kendall
It is the truth. But also note that spent tubes aren't the only reason a fuse can blow.



+1
Quote by evening_crow
As far as i know the only liquor that should not be stored after opened is wine, and even then it's mainly the french one. American wine usually has conservatives in it to stop this.
#5
Quote by Kendall
It is the truth. But also note that spent tubes aren't the only reason a fuse can blow.
True. My first day I played my dual rec, I went to practice, and plugged the power cable into an already almost full power strip. A fuse blew because of that.
#6
Quote by Kendall
It is the truth. But also note that spent tubes aren't the only reason a fuse can blow.


Of course, but considering the popping sounds that seem to precede the fuse blowing, and the fact that the one of the tubes' metal part inside is glowing like a light bulb filament, it would be a fair guess right?
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#7
It's a safe assumption. How old are the tubes and how much abuse do they see?
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#8
About 8-10 months, I can't remember when I bought the amp unfortunately (stupid I know). I play every day, and I also accidentally mismatched the speaker in my combo, which Peavey technical support said would lead to power tubes wearing out slightly faster (I'm playing through then 16 Ohm orange cab I bought today now though - I was worried because it blew the fuse when I was playing on that).

P.S It's matched correctly with the cab, my amp is rated at 16 Ohms.
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#9
In that case it wouldn't be a bad idea to replace the power tubes on principle. Mismatching the speaker load does burn out the tubes faster, but exactly how fast isn't quantifiable.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#10
So if I bought a new set of Ruby Tubes I would have to rebias right? I need this for a gig on friday...
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#11
Yes. You should rebias after every power tube replacement though some companies (i.e. Groove Tubes) have a matching system that keeps this to a minimum (but only if you already have their tubes). A lot of amp techs will rush a job for an additional surcharge.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM