#1
My band has finally recorded a demo and during a certain guitar part u can hear the actual pick scraping the strings =/ is there any way i can edit this out using sony acid or sound forge...its not that loud but if i could only eliminate it i would really be happy with the recordings...please help me out... i would really appreciate it
-Gear-
Agile 2000
Hand Built Telecaster
Fernandes Acoustic/Electric
Line 6 Flextone 2 with Eminence Red Coat The Wizard Speaker
Roland Cube 15 (Practice Amp)
Cry Baby Wah
Hand Built Overdrive Box (From Ts-808 Schematic)
Hand Built Preamp Box
#3
Quote by Decadentor
Dont know sorry


why do you answer then? xD

Idk dude...wich program are you using?
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#4
play in a room with the amps and the mic in another room.
Guitars:
Ibanez RG4EX1
Epiphone SG w/EMG's

Amps:
Peavey Windsor Head w/ JSX Cab
MicroCube (for the sake of practice at college)

Pedals :
Fulltone Full Drive 2 Mosfet
Digitech Whammy
Dunlop Crybaby
#5
acoustic guitar?
what recording program are you using?

more info is helpful.

generally you can try a multi band compressor or some EQ to filter out sounds that you dont want but this could change the tone of the guitar some.

best way to go is not to play so close to the mic if you are using an electric guitar, just mic the amp and stay away.
#6
Im using acid 6.0 to record...and im trying to do it without re recording.....just trying to edit it out..thing is when we recorded we were so far from the amp...sucks...recording sounds so nice otherwise
-Gear-
Agile 2000
Hand Built Telecaster
Fernandes Acoustic/Electric
Line 6 Flextone 2 with Eminence Red Coat The Wizard Speaker
Roland Cube 15 (Practice Amp)
Cry Baby Wah
Hand Built Overdrive Box (From Ts-808 Schematic)
Hand Built Preamp Box
Last edited by Heaven Help Us at Apr 7, 2008,
#7
Do a re-take. This is simply your best option. If you are picking up the pick scratch through the amp, turn down the treble on the amp's EQ and get rid of all reverb. Just make the amp sound as good as possible before you try to capture it. Experiment with your mic placement. If it's picking up too much high end now, move it closer to the center of the speaker, and back it off a few inches.

Signal processing should always be your last resort. A bad performance and/or capture can be masked and made-up, but it's an unnecessary pain in the ass, and will never sound better than a good performance and capture.
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#8
A skilful bit of mutilband compression could reduce it, but there's not really much you can do in terms of postprocessing.

If you did a home recording, it's best to re-record the offending part. If you did it in a studio, and don't have access to the unmixed multitrack, it's tough luck.

Got an mp3 sample of the problem? If it's a single track rather than a complete mix, and you can't re-record, you might be able to reduce it through some judicious EQ and compression.
#9
How would compression reduce it? The whole point of compression is to get something to sit louder, more prominent etc. within the mix.

Besides a retake, the only other practical thing you could attempt would be some heavy-handed eq, perhaps shelving from about 2khz onward. Doubt it would work that well tbh, it would still stick out. Or try 'de-noising' but then it might just turn into a bunch of garble.
#10
Quote by Guitar Eater
How would compression reduce it? The whole point of compression is to get something to sit louder, more prominent etc. within the mix.




But that's not really true, is it? It's something compression can be used for, but the real reason for compression is to even out the peaks and troughs in a piece of audio, so that you get a more even sound in terms of dynamics. Plus, they recommended multi-band compressors, which are a whole different beast.

I would have a go with the EQ and compression, but I think the best way will be the retake. Or just learn to live with it? Could you post the recording so we can see how harsh it is, because I generally don't mind certain amounts of pick sound.
There is poetry in despair.