#1
If the answer to this question is yes, then I finally get it! Get whats been confusing me for a long time.

The major scale, is the same as the minor scale but 3 frets lower??

So you play the minor pentatonic scale in A, move it down 3 frets, and its A major??
Quote by roythereaper
Nice bum >.> <.<
#2
Quote by stratele
If the answer to this question is yes, then I finally get it! Get whats been confusing me for a long time.

The major scale, is the same as the minor scale but 3 frets lower??

So you play the minor pentatonic scale in A, move it down 3 frets, and its A major??

No, that's F# minor, the relative minor of A major. They are not the same thing, however.
#3
The pentatonic major scale uses the second note on the low E string as its root, i think. So if your playing an A minor Pentatonic, it could also be the B or B# major scale, i forget which one. I think, altho im not too sure.
#4
Quote by :-D
No, that's F# minor, the relative minor of A major. They are not the same thing, however.


A major pentatonic even, not A major

Let me review it again
Quote by roythereaper
Nice bum >.> <.<
#5
Quote by qotsa1998
The pentatonic major scale uses the second note on the low E string as its root, i think. So if your playing an A minor Pentatonic, it could also be the B or B# major scale, i forget which one. I think, altho im not too sure.

I'm not sure I understand what you're attempting to say. The position doesn't matter, a position is not a scale. If he plays A C D E G, then he's working in A minor pentatonic.
#6
Quote by :-D
I'm not sure I understand what you're attempting to say. The position doesn't matter, a position is not a scale. If he plays A C D E G, then he's working in A minor pentatonic.


all i'm saying is....

A minor pentatonic.... Root note on the 6th string on the 5th fret right? (i know there are others but use this postition as an example)

The same shape is played in the A MAJOR pentatonic but at the 2nd fret.

So if you move it all down 3 frets from the minor scales, your in major. Am i correct?

A minor penatonic is also C MAJOR penatonic?
Quote by roythereaper
Nice bum >.> <.<
#7
Quote by stratele
all i'm saying is....

A minor pentatonic.... Root note on the 6th string on the 5th fret right? (i know there are others but use this postition as an example)

The same shape is played in the A MAJOR pentatonic but at the 2nd fret.

So if you move it all down 3 frets from the minor scales, your in major. Am i correct?

A minor penatonic is also C MAJOR penatonic?

I was referring to the other guy.

Yes, that would be a position of A minor. Move that shape down 3 frets and play it, and you have F# minor, which is relative to A major but not the same. Learn the notes of the scales rather than just positions.

A minor pentatonic is this: A C D E G
C major pentatonic is this: C D E G A

Same notes, but they're not the same scales.
#8
Yes you can play A min pentatonic then shift down the 3 frets to the A major pentatonic. Guys like angus, page do it all the time. Just as you can use C myxolydian over top of A min penta. Gives you 3 notes per string not the usual 2. Or the extra 2 notes from the A min blues can be thrown in when needed with A min penta.
#9
Quote by Tackleberry
Yes you can play A min pentatonic then shift down the 3 frets to the A major pentatonic. Guys like angus, page do it all the time. Just as you can use C myxolydian over top of A min penta. Gives you 3 notes per string not the usual 2. Or the extra 2 notes from the A min blues can be thrown in when needed with A min penta.

No, if you have this:

e---------------------------5-8------------
B----------------------5-8-----------------
G-----------------5-7----------------------
D------------5-7---------------------------
A-------5-7--------------------------------
E--5-8-------------------------------------

and move it down three frets, you have:

e---------------------------2-5------------
B----------------------2-5-----------------
G-----------------2-4----------------------
D------------2-4---------------------------
A-------2-4--------------------------------
E--2-5-------------------------------------

which is F# minor pentatonic, not A major pentatonic. And if you're in A minor, C is not Mixolydian, it's Ionian. He wasn't thinking modally either, no need to get into it. Just to clarify, here's why:

A minor- A B C D E F G
C Mixolydian- C D E F G A Bb

So you'd need something like a C7 to indicate Mixolydian tonality. A minor doesn't fly with that.
#10
So I guess Andy aledort was wrong when he said the myxolydian could be used with the minor penta in his DVD how to play the blues. And the article in guitar world was wrong about Playing the A min penta then shifting to the A maj penta. The a min penta is at the 5th fret as indicated and yes when at the 3rd fret the same box is the F# min penta also known as the A maj pentatonic.
A min penta C myxolydian
e----------------------5-8--/-----------------------------5-6-8--
B------------------5-8------/-----------------------5-6-8--------
G--------------5-7----------/--------------------5-7-------------
D----------5-7--------------/--------------5-7-8-----------------
A------5-7------------------/---------5-7-8----------------------
E--5-8----------------------/---5-6-8----------------------------

Only difference in notes is the extras. Taken from andy aledorts lesson.
#11
Quote by Tackleberry
So I guess Andy aledort was wrong when he said the myxolydian could be used with the minor penta in his DVD how to play the blues. And the article in guitar world was wrong about Playing the A min penta then shifting to the A maj penta. The a min penta is at the 5th fret as indicated and yes when at the 3rd fret the same box is the F# min penta also known as the A maj pentatonic.
A min penta C myxolydian
e----------------------5-8--/-----------------------------5-6-8--
B------------------5-8------/-----------------------5-6-8--------
G--------------5-7----------/--------------------5-7-------------
D----------5-7--------------/--------------5-7-8-----------------
A------5-7------------------/---------5-7-8----------------------
E--5-8----------------------/---5-6-8----------------------------

Only difference in notes is the extras. Taken from andy aledorts lesson.

The notes of the minor pentatonic scale are 1 b3 4 5 b7, the Mixolydian contains 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7, so they are similar. However, you said you could use "C Mixolydian over A minor pentatonic"; you're not using two scales over top of each other, and they have different applications. For example, a characteristic A minor pentatonic chord is a simple A minor, but if you tried to play the notes of C Mixolydian (keep in mind you're not in the Mixolydian mode because it's not suggested by the chording) it wouldn't sound like what you probably want. The characteristic note of C Mixolydian is Bb (b7), which would serve as a b9 against the A minor chord.

They have different applications, you can't use C Mixolydian over an A minor progression.

Quote by Tackleberry
Only difference in notes is the extras. Taken from andy aledorts lesson.
The differences are a 2, a 3 and a 6, pretty big change from minor pentatonic. They're not applied in the same way; the minor pentatonic implies key-based music whereas Mixolydian implies modal music.

Quote by Tackleberry
And the article in guitar world was wrong about Playing the A min penta then shifting to the A maj penta. The a min penta is at the 5th fret as indicated and yes when at the 3rd fret the same box is the F# min penta also known as the A maj pentatonic.

If it said "shift down three frets to A major", then yes, it's wrong. F# minor may contain the same notes, but that doesn't mean it's the same thing. Far from it. The scales have different intervals, tonal centers and applications. The terms are not interchangeable.
Last edited by :-D at Apr 9, 2008,
#12
Im not going to say your intervals etc are wrong. Im going to reference the article I got my info from. Sept 2007 Guitar world, Soloing strategies by Tom Kolb. He talks of mixing the 2 scales E min and E maj scales. Which gives as he calls it a 8 note hybrid scale with both minor and major qualities. And gives a long list of big names who have used this method. So if it would work with E it would work with A. Im not saying the 2 scales are interchangable, just that they can be played together. The article about mixolydian was in dec 2007 by the same guy. If it works who cares if the music theory says its wrong.
#13
Quote by Tackleberry
Im not going to say your intervals etc are wrong. Im going to reference the article I got my info from. Sept 2007 Guitar world, Soloing strategies by Tom Kolb. He talks of mixing the 2 scales E min and E maj scales. Which gives as he calls it a 8 note hybrid scale with both minor and major qualities. And gives a long list of big names who have used this method. So if it would work with E it would work with A. Im not saying the 2 scales are interchangable, just that they can be played together. The article about mixolydian was in dec 2007 by the same guy. If it works who cares if the music theory says its wrong.

I'm just trying to clarify this for anybody reading. All I'm saying is that using the term "Mixolydian" implies modal music, which it likely isn't in this case. The note that would make C Mixolydian a Mixolydian scale would be Bb, so you could just look at it as an A minor scale with an added b2. It'd basically be A Bb B C D E F G; obviously not a diatonic scale, but that's essentially what you'd be using. It's a symmetrical scale though, it's fine to say that.

You're correct, though, as a lot of blues uses minor and major scales in the same piece. I'm just trying to clarify this a little bit in theoretical terms. It works fine, but not for the reasons you described. No harm done though.
Last edited by :-D at Apr 12, 2008,
#14
Well in terms of scale patterns/shapes B minor is the same and D major which is also the same as E dorian for example= less patterns to learn yay
#15
Quote by Mr.Kvx10
Well in terms of scale patterns/shapes B minor is the same and D major which is also the same as E dorian for example= less patterns to learn yay

And none of those are the same as any of the others. A scale is not a pattern.