#1
Is it just me, or can you not beat a nice trebely bass sound?

I do like the rich deeper tones that is favoured by some artists, but I find a really nice trebley tone which cuts through the mix to be perfect, i.e. Pat Badger from Extreme, Geddy Lee, Frankie Bello and at an immense level DD Verni from Overkill (he takes it a bit too far, but it sounds a wee bit awesome most of the time.)

So tell me, is anyone else in favour of a nice cutting tone as opposed to whatever?
Currently attempting to learn: The Dissentience by Protest The Hero in it's entirety.
#2
Yes, but only if you're trying to stand out in the band, or practicing by yourself, lots of treble can be fun at times. In my band, I tried turning up treble a few times, but my amp hisses like no other :[
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#3
I do often find myself soloing upwards in pitch more frequently than gettin' low.
#4
Definetely, that's part of the reason I bought a Spector, though I've not really used it in a band environment yet. I love the high-end sizzle. Although I think a tone with lots of highs that does cut through still needs to be supported by some decent low end. Check out Mic Todd's tone in No World For Tomorrow album. He really cuts through, but the low end really supports the band.
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#5
Quote by Bullet-Rule
Definetely, that's part of the reason I bought a Spector, though I've not really used it in a band environment yet. I love the high-end sizzle. Although I think a tone with lots of highs that does cut through still needs to be supported by some decent low end. Check out Mic Todd's tone in No World For Tomorrow album. He really cuts through, but the low end really supports the band.


I've got all the Coheed albums and he has a great tone, can always distinguish it in the mix but it isn't over the top like the aforementioned DD Verni.
Currently attempting to learn: The Dissentience by Protest The Hero in it's entirety.
#6
I find it extremely hard to get a good cutting through tone for a band setting. It's either too clangy/poppy, too crisp, not bassy enough, or too bassy.. It really depends on what kind of music you're playing too. For example, metal you usualy want to blend into the mix to give the band a powerful, heavy tone. With funk/rock sorta stuff you have to have just the right EQ of mids and treble, along with of course bass, without being too bassy.. Easier said than done in my opinion.
Gear:

Basses:
2008 American Standard Fender Jazz
Ibanez SRX300
Amp(s):
Ashdown MAG 300 C410T + 1x15
Effects:
SansAmp 3-Channel Bass Driver D.I.
#7
i like to boost the mid higs but the treble is also great
My Gear

Squier VM p-bass(i chosed it over a fender!!!) with quarter pounder and gotoh 201!!
fender MIM P bass
epiphone SG 400
#8
I almost always have the treble a little higher than the bass, but I find it rather empty, so I'll usually boost the bass a little, too. Just sounds too tinny... hard to describe the word.
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#9
I love treble, My Ibanez GSR200 gives a nice treble sound when slapping, I dont think you can beat a lovley trebley sound, Mike Dirnt has some good Treble sounds, Love his sound!
#11
Having an aluminum cone speaker, I don't have much choice to have a lot of treble. I usually have my treble set to flat or even cut it a little. (Don't know how you can get anything but flat from a Behringer) Other wise all i get is the clank from strings on frets or it sounds like I'm playing through a tin can.
#12
^ That's not the aluminum cone, that's just the behringer sound in general. Hartke aluminums are very warm.

I prefer mine just a little on the muddy side, but not too much. My bass has a lot of high end to it though, so all I have to do is turn up the tone knob to get more highs.
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#13
I like my high mids and treble

but low end is important

but I'm a fan of that cutting sound too, especially for the poppier stuff my band pumps out at times, also does help stick out in the mix

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#14
Im not shure what you mean.When I turn up the terebel I get a thin sound that I dont like at all.
...it was bright as the sun, but with ten times the heat
#15
I think there's a world of difference between trebly and bright. I really hate those thin, scooped, Fieldy tones that consist of little more than a click and a whomp.

I think I have a very bright tone that does consist of a heapin' helpin' of treble, but it's thick while still being clear. This is an important distinction. It can be done with the proper low-mid cut, treble boost, and midrange restraint. When you crank the mids, your tone begins to have this inexcapable boxiness and significant bass and treble boosts don't really affect the tone too much.
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