#1
Ionian - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1
Dorian - 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 1
Phrygian - 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1
Lydian - 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7 1
Mixolydian - 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7 1
Aeolian - 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1
Locrian - 1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7 1

according to this, i should be able to take the C Major scale, flat the 3rd and 7th notes, and then it will become the C Dorian, right? or is it the D Dorian?

if it's the D Dorian, do i have to start on a D note or do i still use C as the root note? im new to modes so i just need some help. thanks.
#2
It's D Dorian, and you have to start on a D in order to obtain the Dorian tonality.
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#3
Wrong. C major with a flat 3 and flat 7 is C dorian.
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#6
its D dorian
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#7
No, thats wrong to turn the C major scale into a d dorian, you must have the appropriate progression behind it, basically all it is is just basing the scale around D to D, which you don;t even have to do if the chord is like a dminor, you are not basing your scale on the chords key signature, you look at the chords in the song and go okay, its a c major to a diminor, what will i play if iwant to play dorian, so for c major you could play the c major scale tehn for D minor you could play the D dorian. Modes are a re arrangement of the pattern of the notes, not the ntoes themselves.
#8
C major is the same as D dorian.
If you have a normal C major with að flat 3 and 7 it's C dorian, then the major(ionian) of C dorian is A# major
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#9
lol c dorian, d dorian, c dorian, d dorian...everyone is just saying one or the other. i guess they're just the same. anyways, if im using C Dorian (D Dorian if you want to call it that) do i have to start on a D note, C note, doesn't matter, or does it depend on the chord progression?
#10
Quote by guitaristx11
lol c dorian, d dorian, c dorian, d dorian...everyone is just saying one or the other. i guess they're just the same. anyways, if im using C Dorian (D Dorian if you want to call it that) do i have to start on a D note, C note, doesn't matter, or does it depend on the chord progression?

HammerAndSickle is right, look at the notes, they're not the same thing:
C major: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 (C D E F G A B)
C Dorian: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 (C D Eb F G A Bb)
D Dorian: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 (D E F G A B C)

Don't listen to these idiots that tell you it's D Dorian. It's C Dorian if you flat the notes from the C major scale. Flat the third and seventh degrees of the major scale and you get Dorian. Don't call C Dorian something else.

Modality is determined by the chord progression.
Quote by Doodleface
It's D Dorian, and you have to start on a D in order to obtain the Dorian tonality.

I addressed your first point, but you don't have to start on the D in order to establish the modality. If you have a D Dorian vamp (such as Dm7 G7), you can use any notes from the D Dorian scale (D E F G A B C) regardless of the order you play them in.

Quote by arondadi
C major is the same as D dorian.
If you have a normal C major with að flat 3 and 7 it's C dorian, then the major(ionian) of C dorian is A# major

The parent scale of C Dorian is Bb major, not A# major. Dorian is based on the second degree of the scale, and in A# major C would be the b3.

hurricanefresh: C major to D minor is not a Dorian progression. You wouldn't be playing in Dorian at all.

This should hopefully clear up any inconsistencies here.
Last edited by :-D at Apr 7, 2008,
#11
Quote by :-D
HammerAndSickle is right, look at the notes, they're not the same thing:
C major: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 (C D E F G A B)
C Dorian: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 (C D Eb F G A Bb)
D Dorian: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 (D E F G A B C)

Don't listen to these idiots that tell you it's D Dorian. It's C Dorian if you flat the notes from the C major scale. Flat the third and seventh degrees of the major scale and you get Dorian. Don't call C Dorian something else.

Modality is determined by the chord progression.

I addressed your first point, but you don't have to start on the D in order to establish the modality. If you have a D Dorian vamp (such as Dm7 G7), you can use any notes from the D Dorian scale (D E F G A B C) regardless of the order you play them in.


The parent scale of C Dorian is Bb major, not A# major. Dorian is based on the second degree of the scale, and in A# major C would be the b3.

hurricanefresh: C major to D minor is not a Dorian progression. You wouldn't be playing in Dorian at all.

This should hopefully clear up any inconsistencies here.


It would still produce a dorian quality is what i meant, whether you start At D or not.