#1
Hi I was taking test at teoria.com about key signatures and it gave me D#.

I started with BEAD-GCF but the tone one step below D# is C# and there's no C# in the formula, only C. How am I supposed to use the formula for keys like that? Do I use the enharmonic key E flat and then turn the sharps into flats?
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#2
Quote by StrokeMidnight
Hi I was taking test at teoria.com about key signatures and it gave me D#.

I started with BEAD-GCF but the tone one step below D# is C# and there's no C# in the formula, only C. How am I supposed to use the formula for keys like that? Do I use the enharmonic key E flat and then turn the sharps into flats?



You cant use that formula for a key like that because there is no key signature for D#. it "doesn't exist". By not existing I mean its not in standard use, and is not a standard key.

but yeah the enharmonic key..... is Eb. Im just not sure if thats what they are looking for.


btw can you show us what the question was.... how was it worded exactly?
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 7, 2008,
#4
technically, the note one step below D# is actually C## (double sharp)

the key signature for D# would be everything sharped, but the F and C would be double sharped.
The C# has all 7 sharps in it, so the circle of fifths would continue with G# having every sharp with an F## in its signature and then so on and so forth.
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#6
standard keys don't contain double sharps, or double flats, D# does. when writing a key you don't want to use a letter name more than once *example* instead of B, B# you would put B, C, and you also don't want to mix sharps or flats

so D# is

D#, E#, Fx, G#, A#, B# ,Cx

x =double sharp
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#7
The fact already mentioned that the key of D# does not "exist" in the circle of fifths is the correct answer like GuitarMunky said. The enharmonic key would be used. Like Lefty7Stringer said, it is due to double sharps or double flats being confusing.

However, if you are asked to make a key signature for D#(or anything else like Fb) remember you can always just use your scale step(or interval)formula to figure it out!
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#8
I'm not sure how to use the circle of fifths, but maybe it can help me.

What I was doing was taking an interval quiz. The starting note was D# and I needed to get a minor seventh. The first thing I do when figuring out intervals is count seven spaces up since it's a seventh, then I find out which notes are sharp in the D# major scale so that I can flat them in case the seventh was G# I would know to make it G instead of Gb. (I know the seventh of D# isn't G#, I just made it up.)
The first question I ask myself when something doesn't seem to be beautiful is why do I think it's not beautiful. And very shortly you discover that there is no reason.-John Cage
#9
Is there a difference between a minor third and a diminished third?
The first question I ask myself when something doesn't seem to be beautiful is why do I think it's not beautiful. And very shortly you discover that there is no reason.-John Cage
#11
Quote by ouchies
I think a diminished 3rd would be a half step lower than a minor third.. don't quote me on that one though.

That's correct. A minor interval lowered by a half step is diminished. C to Ebb is an example of a diminished third.
#13
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Wouldn't, in practicality, you be more likely to hear major 2nd than diminished 3rd? IS there really a use for a diminished 3rd? I'm guessing it serves some kind of function.
Yes you would. I can't really think of a use for a diminished 3rd, but it's out there, primarily for uniformity with the rest of the intervals I'm guessing.
#14
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Wouldn't, in practicality, you be more likely to hear major 2nd than diminished 3rd? IS there really a use for a diminished 3rd? I'm guessing it serves some kind of function.


Diminished thirds are found between the seventh and ninth degrees of the double harmonic major. They are different than minor seconds, although enharmonic. Any two notes that are two semitones away, but function as a third are diminished, and must not be called a major second.