#1
Sorry for my noobyness Is sounds like a Locrian, but I don't think it is.

---------------------------------1-3-5-
-----------------------------3-5-
----------------------2-4-5-
---------------2-3-5-
--------2-3-5-
-1-3-5-

Anyone have any ideas / help? Cheers!
#2
thats F lydian

but id play it like this:

----------------------------------3-5-7
-----------------------------3-5-6
----------------------2-4-5-
---------------2-3-5-
--------2-3-5-
-1-3-5-
#3
Fantastic, thanks!

It actually sounds loads better the way you mentioned aswell

I'm writing a song based around that scale, but the song is actually in the key of A.

Cheers!
#4
Quote by BGSM
Fantastic, thanks!

It actually sounds loads better the way you mentioned aswell

I'm writing a song based around that scale, but the song is actually in the key of A.

Cheers!


Then the song is not modal, it is in A minor. Scales are not box shapes. Those notes are only lydian if they resolve to F.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
Quote by Archeo Avis
Then the song is not modal, it is in A minor. Scales are not box shapes. Those notes are only lydian if they resolve to F And if the chord, bass or arpeggio underneath is based around Fmajor.
Fix'd
#6
If it sounds like lydian, it's lydian.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#7
Quote by Ænimus Prime
If it sounds like lydian, it's lydian.


but he said it sounded like locrian
Quote by Trefellin


He's been in the Pit so long, he's forgotten about television. His whole life is about pears, cats, Spartans and rape. So much so that the mind control tube has lost it's powers over him. It's sad really.
#8
...If it sounds like locrian, it's locrian.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#9
Quote by Ænimus Prime
...If it sounds like locrian, it's locrian.


The sound of a mode/scale is determined to much by other factors for it to be the sole indicator. He said he was writing the song in the key of A minor, which tells me it resolves to A, which would make it A minor.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
The sound of a mode/scale is determined to much by other factors for it to be the sole indicator.
I don't follow you.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#11
Quote by Ænimus Prime
...If it sounds like locrian, it's locrian.
It only sounds like locrian/lydian because he isnt playing chords underneath, he's just playing the box shape. And the reason the box shape is lydian, but it sounds locrian is that locrian is the fourth degree of lydian. When chords arent underneath, its easy to listen to a boxshape and think its another mode starting on its the fifth/fourth.

Modes arent scales, and will sound different and change with different chords underneath, you cant use modes effectively unless you learn this.
#12
Quote by demonofthenight
Fix'd


Those things are only a means of establishing a tonal center.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#13
Quote by Archeo Avis
Those things are only a means of establishing a tonal center.

But you need a tonal center when using modes, else your tonal center can get confused and you'll end up sounding different than what you want to sound like.

But you can get a tonal center without chords, arpegios and so on if you refer to the root heaps and play the 3rd, 5th and 7th intervals heaps, arpeggios work best.
#14
Quote by demonofthenight
But you need a tonal center when using modes, else your tonal center can get confused and you'll end up sounding different than what you want to sound like.

But you can get a tonal center without chords, arpegios and so on if you refer to the root heaps and play the 3rd, 5th and 7th intervals heaps, arpeggios work best.


That's what I said.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#15
If something sounds like locrian, it's because the ear has established some kind of tonal centre/reference and the notes played correspond to the intervals of the locrian mode.

Sounds like locrian, is locrian.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#16
Quote by Ænimus Prime
If something sounds like locrian, it's because the ear has established some kind of tonal centre/reference and the notes played correspond to the intervals of the locrian mode.

Sounds like locrian, is locrian.


If it sounds like locrian, it's because someone has a preconceived notion of what locrian "sounds like". In this case, it would only be locrian if the tonal center is E. If it's not (and the thread starter has already stated that he wrote the song "in A") then it's not locrian. The scale or mode is a very small part of the overall sound of a piece of music. Something "in locrian" can sound any number of different ways.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#17
Quote by Archeo Avis
That's what I said.
When?
Quote by Ænimus Prime
If something sounds like locrian, it's because the ear has established some kind of tonal centre/reference and the notes played correspond to the intervals of the locrian mode.
Only cause he didnt establish his tonal center, if he established it (which takes skill), it would sound like lydian.
Last edited by demonofthenight at Apr 8, 2008,
#18
Quote by demonofthenight
When?


Here...

Those notes are only lydian if they resolve to F


...and here...

Those things are only a means of establishing a tonal center.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#20
If it sounds like locrian, it's because someone has a preconceived notion of what locrian "sounds like".
Yeah I guess. I don't see what you're getting at.

The scale or mode is a very small part of the overall sound of a piece of music. Something "in locrian" can sound any number of different ways.
Of course, but it can't sound like it has a major seventh or major second. Unique intervals, unique sound.

Only cause he didnt establish his tonal center
He didn't have to, his ear established it for him. If it sounds like locrian to him it's because his ear hears E as the tonal centre.

if he established it (which takes skill), it would sound like lydian.
He could make the tonal centre any note, thus making any mode.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#21
Quote by Ænimus Prime
He didn't have to, his ear established it for him. If it sounds like locrian to him it's because his ear hears E as the tonal centre.
But... but... didnt he want lydian? The shape starts on the note that would yell LYDIAN, I think he wants lydian...
Quote by Ænimus Prime
He could make the tonal centre any note, thus making any mode.
Well duh. But the true skill lies in controlling that tonal center. Something I'm mastering, as I have no musician friends to establish a tonal center for me
#22
But... but... didnt he want lydian?
Did he? I thought he didn't know what it was and that it sounded like locrian?

Well duh
Well I know you know that, I just felt it necessary to point it out because your post could be taken that either
1, regardless of the tonal centre, that mode is lydian
or
2, the only possible tonal centre is F, making F lydian.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#23
Quote by Ænimus Prime
Did he? I thought he didn't know what it was and that it sounded like locrian?

Well I know you know that, I just felt it necessary to point it out because your post could be taken that either
1, regardless of the tonal centre, that mode is lydian
or
2, the only possible tonal centre is F, making F lydian.
The shape started and ended with F, right? So thats the tonal center, right?
#24
Doesn't matter what it starts and ends on, what is heard as the tonal centre IS the tonal centre. He heard it as locrian, which would make the tonal centre E.

But yes, I would agree that that scale on its own is F lydian.

Edit: How was what you quoted relevant?
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
Last edited by Ænimus Prime at Apr 8, 2008,