#1
Hi,

Im just learning chord theory and something is puzzling me.

I have the notes DFC. Has a min 3rd and min 7th. So im assuming its a Dmin7 with no 5th just using basic interval distance im working that out.

So If I was to voice this chord CDF, this time it has a Maj2nd (D) and an perfect 4th (F)

Does the name of this chord change? And if so, how do I find a new name for it. If not, why?

Thanks guys
#4
Quote by vincpa
Hi,

Im just learning chord theory and something is puzzling me.

I have the notes DFC. Has a min 3rd and min 7th. So im assuming its a Dmin7 with no 5th just using basic interval distance im working that out.

So If I was to voice this chord CDF, this time it has a Maj2nd (D) and an perfect 4th (F)

Does the name of this chord change? And if so, how do I find a new name for it. If not, why?

Thanks guys
Really depends on what the melody and the bass are doing, but I doubt it as I dont see the harmonic stability of a major second/perfect fourth chord. Just call it a Dm/C or something, that slash just means the bass (but not the root) has changed.

And when I'm playing in my jazz band, I almost always leave out the fifth, It's really just filler, unless the chords a diminished/augmented chord. Play the fifth if your fingers can form that chord, othewise feel free to leave it out. Just remember that playing complicated chords (X13 and so on) exact are meant for pianist, not guitarists.
#5
Quote by vincpa
Hi,

Im just learning chord theory and something is puzzling me.

I have the notes DFC. Has a min 3rd and min 7th. So im assuming its a Dmin7 with no 5th just using basic interval distance im working that out.

So If I was to voice this chord CDF, this time it has a Maj2nd (D) and an perfect 4th (F)
For now, it's the good to remember that chords are best seen as a stacking of thirds. When you get things such as Maj2nds, P4ths, then it's a big clue that you have to re-organize those notes so they correspond in terms of 3rds, 5ths, 7ths, 9ths etc.

Of course, there are a bunch of weird chords, but the basic rule I stated above always acts as a foundation for figuring out the the tonic of the chord. hope it helps.
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#6
Quote by demonofthenight
Play the fifth if your fingers can form that chord, othewise feel free to leave it out. Just remember that playing complicated chords (X13 and so on) exact are meant for pianist, not guitarists.

I'd say leave the fifth out whenever you're comping unless you're playing something diminished, augmented, anything that involves the fifth to determine quality. It doesn't help to establish a chord's tonality, and the less notes the better when someone else has the melody or a solo. And guitarists should know all the "complicated chords" as well, it helps to know your extensions.
Last edited by :-D at Apr 8, 2008,
#7
Really depends on the context. It could be a Dm/C or just an inversion of Dm7, but there's just no way of knowing without stuff around it. For instance, if the progression went Dm, your CDF chord, Bm7b5, Bmaj7, chances are it's a Dm/C but it could be totally different, and what you're playing on guitar becomes significantly less integral to naming the chord when you've got a bassist.