#1
So we are doing a recording project in my school, and today my friend and the teacher had an argument over the correct way to record a drum track. If the drummer made a significant mistake, is it better to stop recording, edit out the mistake and take off from where the mistake was made or start over with a new take at recording the drums. Please only comment if you have experience with this, or know of professional musicians who have been in the same type of recording situation.
Quote by LedZepKicksAzz
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#3
Quote by GoWithTheFlow
start over


not true. it depends entirely on what you're working with.

if you've got a perfect drum track except for one hit somewhere that was slightly off and you're working digitally, punch in a hit to fix the mistake and go back and erase the bad hit.

if you're working with tape imo its a bit more difficult.

me personally i prefer to have a track thats perfect beginning to end, no punch ins/outs but thats just me. in a professional sense it doesn't make the most sense.
#4
Quote by z4twenny
not true. it depends entirely on what you're working with.

if you've got a perfect drum track except for one hit somewhere that was slightly off and you're working digitally, punch in a hit to fix the mistake and go back and erase the bad hit.

if you're working with tape imo its a bit more difficult.

me personally i prefer to have a track thats perfect beginning to end, no punch ins/outs but thats just me. in a professional sense it doesn't make the most sense.

So if theres a significant mistake as opposed to a slight one, its better to start over, correct?
Quote by LedZepKicksAzz
You are simply the greatest person ever to walk this great planet.
#6
^ depends on what you mean by significant. if a lot of hits are off then get a different friggin drummer LOL (or i dunno if he's tired or something y'know, a good reason for it to be off)

make sure you have him record to a metronome too, that should help.

but i would say yes, if a lot of it is off then i'd say start over. if you punch in over everything you'll be able to tell in the end and it will be harder to mix.
#7
personal experience: always start over if a hit is bad. drums are harder to edit out hits than guitars due to the cymbals. when we recorded drums for my old band i would just make a track with a few thousand bars and click record and just leave the room for a while. if he messed up he could just wait a few seconds and start over. if he came to a break in the song he could just start from there.

an easier remedy would be to trigger all of the heads and use overheads for the cymbals. if you miss a hit on a drum then you can just fix its timing in midi. if you hit a cymbal wrong theres a chance it doesnt sound that bad, if you completely miss a hit on a cymbal just record a sample of a hit and try and blend it in. triggers sound a lot more stable, at least on kick drum.
#8
The challenge in editing out drum hits or shifting them to where they are supposed to go is that you generally mic a drum kit up with more than one mic. Sure, you can isolate your snare track and move a hit over a smidge as need be, but that same early/late hit is going to be picked up in the overheads, and may well be picked up in every other mic in the room too.

Though conventional wisdom says to 'start over' with a drum track with errors, it doesn't have to be. Ed Stasium isn't afraid to do punch-ins (Ramones, Living Colour, Talking Heads, Mick Jagger) with drums.

CT
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