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#1
I've noticed here that many of you are young players, wondering what might be the best path to follow, should you really stick with music, so I thought it would be helpful to categorize some possible tracks to take.

With production education the possible positions are as broad as MIDI Engineering, Music Director, Producer, Program Director, Recording Engineer, Studio Director or Manager...the producer works mostly on a free-lance basis with T.V. production, theatres and production companies.

With a film score emphasis on arranging you can look at Film Composer, Music Editor, Music Supervisor/Director, Film Arranger/Adapter, Film Conductor, Film Music Orchestrator, Synthesis Specialist, Theme Specialist...the film composer is hired by the film's director and producer...the music supervisor/director is hired by the film producer. You may act as an A&R scout to find popular songs for the soundtrack.

With a jazz and contemporary music arranging focus then you could be an Arranger, Composer, Conductor, Copyist, Jingle Writer, Orchestrator, Record Producer, Teacher, Transcriber, Publishing Editor...basically a freelance gig, but sometimes you can find staff arranging jobs in studios or churches, cruise lines or theatre companies.

If you had a songwriting emphasis then you could be a Composer, Jingle Writer, Lyricist, Producer/Songwriter, Singer/Performing Songwriter, Staff or Freelance Songwriter...staff Songwriters are hired by record companies, music publishers, producers, recording groups...Nashville has many publishing companies with staff writers, for example.

Best of luck!

Scott


#3
thanks, this is what ive wanted o know for a long while - I never asked anyone though.

Its still not easy to live from music
Looking for a new sig!
#4
Quote by samerika
thanks, this is what ive wanted o know for a long while - I never asked anyone though.

Its still not easy to live from music


I have been playing for 28 years, and for the last 18 years I've done NOTHING else but play music full time.

It is possible.


#5
excellent post...and I'm very jealous of you
Gear:
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#6
Scott, I've liked all of your threads so far (All the ones I've seen, anyways)-they're all jam-packed full of useful knowledge. While some of what you say may seem somewhat basic, like the treating people nicely thread, it is nevertheless extremely good to know and you word it very well besides; you're quickly becoming one of my favorite posters on these forums. Props for another great thread!
Studies show that 89.27% of all statistics are made up on the spot.
#7
Quote by lethalagent14
Scott, I've liked all of your threads so far (All the ones I've seen, anyways)-they're all jam-packed full of useful knowledge. While some of what you say may seem somewhat basic, like the treating people nicely thread, it is nevertheless extremely good to know and you word it very well besides; you're quickly becoming one of my favorite posters on these forums. Props for another great thread!


Thanks man.

You would think that treating people with respect WOULD be a basic and obvious concept, yet, far too many enter this business with the rock -n- roll rebel mentality. In the real world, in the world of "just playing professionally", success WILL depend on relationships more so than chops in many cases.

Peace,

Scott


#8
Good stuff. Very useful, I'll definitely keep this threat in mind.
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#9
I wanted to bring this thread back up, 5 years since I posted it. Still could be helpful, I think.

Update: I'm still only doing music, full time, as I was 5 years ago. I began playing in 1980. I began as a full time career in 1990. Haven't had a day job since.

It is possible.

Hope the information in the initial post is helpful.


#10
^^^ Perhaps you can add a step-by-step how you managed to live off music full time. Contacts/networking/what you needed to do etc. Obviously its not as easy as simply applying for a position in the newspaper. This would help users actually achieve their goals.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#11
I'll give a very oversimplified answer first. And when time permits, I'll put something something more detailed together.

Simply put: say yes to everything you can. Be prepared for anything. Do nothing with contempt.


#12
I've personally made my living playing (live bands, churches and recording sessions), teaching (theory, guitar, bass, drums, piano), music directing, band leading, arranging, transcribing, orchestrating (at a 5000 member modern mega church for 18 years), from my home studio: composing cues for licensing in media, composing music on commission, orchestration for artists' music, recording guitar parts and solos for artists' music.


#13
I'll just play a generic UG user for a sec.

I'm a 16 year old metal guitarist and I play in a band. What do I do now to become a session guitarist?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#14
Quote by AlanHB
I'll just play a generic UG user for a sec.

I'm a 16 year old metal guitarist and I play in a band. What do I do now to become a session guitarist?


I have a pretty extensive post about this that I will post below, that is the summation of everything required to truly be on target, however, in the end, if you know your instrument inside and out in several styles, speak the common language of music, and are dependable...you'll get work. No one will be giving you pop quizzes on theory in a session, but your weaknesses will be illuminated by virtue of your lack of skill in the moment.

Here's a good path. It's worked for me, and before someone says its too much, consider that if you are unwillng to put in the proper time and dedication to master your craft, then perhaps it's not what you are truly meant to pursue.

What I did...and what to do...

So......

LEARN your instrument...inside and out...

Not merely how to play it, but about different tones, different textures, unique layers...

Listen to every kind of player...so when a producer, client or engineer asks for a certain sound, you know exactly what they mean...

Learn to read music...

And not merely read, but interpret...so when you see the style marked at the top of the chart as "Bruce Hornsby Feel", or "Rock Shuffle", or "Modern Acoustic Rock"...you'll know how to pull those styles out of your instrument while reading the notes, chord symbols and rhythms...

Learn about and be aware of every other instrument, every kind of player...you may be the one calling the shots on a session...asking the drummer to play a Bernard Perdie shuffle...or a violinist to play more Celtic...

When you feel ready...just go around to various studios with a diverse demo of yourself, and pass it along...play with players who do session work, and if you've cut their gigs, they'll put the word out....

Leave your ego at home...and while suggestions aren't taboo, be very careful not to step on the producer's toes...just do what they ask...give them what they've paid you for, and if you can slip in an idea of your own, make sure it's for the betterment of the projcect, not just an excuse to rip your own thing...

Listen as well as read...did the drummer and bass player decide to change a rhythm or accent? ...then follow them...

Always be ready to totally re-do what YOU thought was a perfect take...it may NOT be what THEY wanted...

Really, it's about relationships, and building trust over time...establish with the right people, that YOU are the go-to guy, and you WILL get work...

DO NOT over book yourself...make sure you set aside the time to do the session and stay til the end...it's great to be busy, but if you send in a sub to your next session, he may wind up with the gig more than you...

Don't steal gigs from other players...if the client likes you more than the guy he's been using, GREAT...but don't go around stabbing people in the back to get work...those people might be hiring YOU someday...

Own, or have immediate access to, many different types of guitars...

Be able to bring:

a strat or strat-like electric...really, having tons of guitars is good, if possible.

an acoustic 6-string...

some kind of mandolin or miniature guitar...

SOME ODD GUITARS TO OWN OR HAVE ACCESS TO:

a 7-string, a baritone, a sitar.....

know how to use a capo and alternate tunings...

have one guitar available for low tunings, with heavier guage strings...

Also:

Own many different amps or, own one excellent modelling amp...

And think outside the box...

A friend of mine in Nashville told me a story of a session he was on, where the drummer Steve Brewster, made a hi-hat out of two giant crash cymbals...and also in the same session, placed towels on all of his drums for one tune, then manipulated the tracks in a sampler to create some wicked drum loops...

So think like that as a guitarist...how can you use your instrument in a way that's different from the norm?

Also...

Do not be afraid to utilize the recording technology...

In other words, if you've been playing the tune up to a point in an open string, guitaristic key, like G major...and after the bridge, the tune goes up a half-step to Ab major...don't hesitate to stop the recording, put on a capo, roll back and nail the rest of the tune with the more open sound allowed with the capo...it will sound much brighter and clearer than close fretting everything in bar chords, with no open strings...

On sight-reading:

Learning the notes on the staff is not the same as reading music...so be careful...just as knowing the notes on the fretboard, is not playing guitar...

The best way to learn to read music, is to put yourself in situations that REQUIRE it during performance, and believe me, you'll pick up on it...

Read charts, while listening to the corresponding performance...

If you ARE in a playing situation with other that CAN read...listen to the guys around you that are doing it, and read the chart while they play it correctly...

Learn how to interpret chord symbols on sight (Cmaj7...Bb7b5...F11...Gm9...C13...etc...)

Don't be deceived, rhythms are as important (probably more so) than single notes, or even chordal reading...learn what rhythms sound like, and feel like...(much of the charts you run into, will have only chord symbols and rhythmic accents)

Don't be deceived, reading single notes on guitar is NOT that difficult...as some would have you believe (with regard to the "many choices for the same pitch" argument) ...read positionally...and read ahead...always considering where you are and where you're going to make positional choices area by area...

A fantastic book for this is Tommy Tedesco's "For Guitar Players Only"...if you can find it...

Read through piano scores, sax solos, string quartets (always with the piece playing)...other instruments reading methods can help you on guitar...

Learn to read Bass Clef (or the "F" clef) ...many times you will read unison to a bass player's parts...

And so forth.......

Anyway......the list goes on, but what is crucial is that anyone headed in this direction, should not look for an easy way in. Anything worth doing, is worth doing well.


Last edited by Scott Jones at Jan 13, 2013,
#16
Quote by Life Is Brutal
What Career choices exist for someone with a BA in Music with Theory Emphasis?


gas station attendant

you have the same chance as anybody else provided you have the skill, credits, and passion to back up whatever field it is you want to focus on. if you don't have a specific idea on what you want to do, you're behind. i know you were dual majoring so you'd have a safe backing, but it's important to realize how vulnerable many music jobs are - you have to cover your own insurance, paychecks can be sporadic, &c. - and that the clients will typically just want the job done.

if you don't put your all into (insert goal field in the wide realm of music), you're likely to get thrown to the wolves. like in any field, you won't get your degree then have somebody whisper in your ear a secret website with tons of relevant, reliable jobs that you'd be perfect for. you have to actively search, and at times potentially ***** yourself out.

want to compose? compose your ass off, and don't wait until you leave school. find some film students who are doing an indie production and work on that. want to produce? start saving for production equipment and meeting people around campus. so on and so forth

my .02 tho, scott's actually been in the game probably longer than i've been alive so maybe he'll have something more positive and less in the abhorrent realm of social darwinism
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Last edited by Hail at Jan 13, 2013,
#17
Quote by Life Is Brutal
What Career choices exist for someone with a BA in Music with Theory Emphasis?


I'd think that composing, arranging, scoring for film and media would be be the likely paths.


#18
Quote by Hail
gas station attendant

you have the same chance as anybody else provided you have the skill, credits, and passion to back up whatever field it is you want to focus on. if you don't have a specific idea on what you want to do, you're behind. i know you were dual majoring so you'd have a safe backing, but it's important to realize how vulnerable many music jobs are - you have to cover your own insurance, paychecks can be sporadic, &c. - and that the clients will typically just want the job done.

if you don't put your all into (insert goal field in the wide realm of music), you're likely to get thrown to the wolves. like in any field, you won't get your degree then have somebody whisper in your ear a secret website with tons of relevant, reliable jobs that you'd be perfect for. you have to actively search, and at times potentially ***** yourself out.

want to compose? compose your ass off, and don't wait until you leave school. find some film students who are doing an indie production and work on that. want to produce? start saving for production equipment and meeting people around campus. so on and so forth

my .02 tho, scott's actually been in the game probably longer than i've been alive so maybe he'll have something more positive and less in the abhorrent realm of social darwinism


All of the above.


#19
Sounds like a lot of work, lot of easier ways to make money for sure.
You'd have to be really passionate about it unless you learned to site read at an early age with piano or something. For the average 16 yr old shredder who's been playing for a couple of years, and can't already site read, the chance of them committing to all this is probably just above nil.
#20
Yes, the worst attitude is "I have a music degree in _____. What jobs are there?"

The answer is none. Working in the music industry completely depends on you making a job for yourself. There is no hiring board, there is no career fairs, there is no HR. You become your own business when you want to be a musician.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#21
Quote by Xiaoxi
Yes, the worst attitude is "I have a music degree in _____. What jobs are there?"

The answer is none. Working in the music industry completely depends on you making a job for yourself. There is no hiring board, there is no career fairs, there is no HR. You become your own business when you want to be a musician.



Yep.


#22
Quote by Tempoe
Sounds like a lot of work, lot of easier ways to make money for sure.
You'd have to be really passionate about it unless you learned to site read at an early age with piano or something. For the average 16 yr old shredder who's been playing for a couple of years, and can't already site read, the chance of them committing to all this is probably just above nil.


Not true.

Anyone who wants something will do whatever it takes.

The so called average shredder will forever remain average without committing to it.


#23
Quote by Scott Jones
Not true.

Anyone who wants something will do whatever it takes.

The so called average shredder will forever remain average without committing to it.


That's why I said You'd have to be really passionate about it
#24
Quote by Tempoe
That's why I said You'd have to be really passionate about it


What people don't realize is that it takes the same amount of time to do absolutely nothing with their lives as it does to become excellent at something.


#25
I'll also add that it astounds me the amount of self proclaimed "professional musicians" who don't act professionally.

At the most basic level I'm talking about showing up on time, learning the songs, taking criticism in stride, adapting and responding to suggestions.

And then we have the extremely widespread "personal preference" inserted into it. "I studied jazz and pop is beneath me", "I'm a metal guitarist what is this ghey stuff" or simply "I don't like this song". Or even worse, they'll take up a gig and proceed to shred all over some acoustic ditty, all in the interests of getting themselves off.

We also have the guys who seemingly improv a new part for a song every single time they play it. I've had one guy say "I'm adverse to playing the same thing twice" ....in the studio no doubt. Look mate I'm sure it's immensely satisfying to improv a new part every time but as we don't know what you're going to put on the record you're fired (and that's exactly what happened).

And then we have the guys who have to needlessly complicate their parts, detracting from the song and ruining grooves. Sorry, I paid you $100 to just play your open E string for 30 mins. Unfortunately you couldn't handle that so you're fired (an extreme example but has also happened in similar circumstances).

Perhaps the most frustrating thing about all these examples is that the player has the physical ability to play what is required from them, but simply choose not to.

Basically it boils down to:

1. The client wants a guitarist who can play the part. If you refuse to play the part, you can't play the part.

2. Learn to identify what parts benefit a song, and what is more to get yourself off.

3. If you are given a part to learn, or are otherwise directed to play something, play it exactly as directed. Don't be tempted to change it in the hopes the client won't notice - they will.

4. If you write a part and the client approves it, don't change it.

5. If you don't like the song nobody cares. Learn to derive your enjoyment for other places (for example, simply playing guitar). Don't do a half assed job on the song because it's not your thing. All you'll be doing is creating your reputation as a half-assed musician, because that's what you are.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#26
Quote by AlanHB
I'll also add that it astounds me the amount of self proclaimed "professional musicians" who don't act professionally.

At the most basic level I'm talking about showing up on time, learning the songs, taking criticism in stride, adapting and responding to suggestions.

And then we have the extremely widespread "personal preference" inserted into it. "I studied jazz and pop is beneath me", "I'm a metal guitarist what is this ghey stuff" or simply "I don't like this song". Or even worse, they'll take up a gig and proceed to shred all over some acoustic ditty, all in the interests of getting themselves off.

We also have the guys who seemingly improv a new part for a song every single time they play it. I've had one guy say "I'm adverse to playing the same thing twice" ....in the studio no doubt. Look mate I'm sure it's immensely satisfying to improv a new part every time but as we don't know what you're going to put on the record you're fired (and that's exactly what happened).

And then we have the guys who have to needlessly complicate their parts, detracting from the ongoing and ruining grooves. Sorry, I paid you $100 to just play your open E string for 30 mins. Unfortunately you couldn't handle that so you're fired (an extreme example but has also happened in similar circumstances).

Basically it boils down to:

1. The client wants a guitarist who can play the part. If you refuse to play the part, you can't play the part.

2. Learn to identify what parts benefit a song, and what is more to get yourself off.

3. If you are given a part to learn, or are otherwise directed to play something, play it exactly as directed. Don't be tempted to change it in the hopes the client won't notice - they will.

4. If you write a part and the client approves it, don't change it.

5. If you don't like the song nobody cares. Learn to derive your enjoyment for other places (for example, simply playing guitar). Don't do a half assed job on the song because it's not your thing. All you'll be doing is creating your reputation as a half-assed musician, because that's what you are.


Exactly. Since I am an orchestrator as well. I always see my part as it layers into the bigger picture. I create plenty of outlets where I can show my stuff, so to speak. When playing anything, any song, ever, I always commit to being a benefit to the greater good. If its a live gig that plays a variety of songs, some I like, some I don't, I simply purpose to the simple prospect that if someone walks in at any given moment in any song, that they are given the impression for that 4 minutes, that it is the only style I play.


Last edited by Scott Jones at Jan 13, 2013,
#27
As an 18 year old musician (not guitarist, musician) it makes me extremely happy that I entered this thread with this mind set already in play.
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#28
Quote by ProphetToJables
As an 18 year old musician (not guitarist, musician) it makes me extremely happy that I entered this thread with this mind set already in play.


Excellent! You're on your way!


#29
Fascinating observation that things like "be able to shred like Vai" or "know the entire Hendrix catalogue" are not in the least bit relevant. It is more about your personal/professional characteristics.

Here is a blog I wrote on a similar topic, but from a slightly different perspective a while back:

http://greenroommusicblog.blogspot.ca/2012/10/so-you-want-to-be-pro-musician-eh.html

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#30
I would also like to point out that being able to work with other musicians is a very important part of careers in the music business. If you take any criticism as a personal insult, or refuse to adapt your style to the situation, then it will be much harder to get jobs than someone who is easier to work with.
Strauss!
"I am hitting my head against the walls, but the walls are giving way." - Gustav Mahler.

Quote by AeolianWolf
absolutely what will said

Yay, my first compliment!
#31
I'd love to get work doing commercial music, as a player or arranger. What are some basic genres, styles, or techniques a session/commercial guitarist should demonstrate on a Demo?
#32
Quote by axemanchris
Fascinating observation that things like "be able to shred like Vai" or "know the entire Hendrix catalogue" are not in the least bit relevant. It is more about your personal/professional characteristics.

Here is a blog I wrote on a similar topic, but from a slightly different perspective a while back:

http://greenroommusicblog.blogspot.ca/2012/10/so-you-want-to-be-pro-musician-eh.html

CT


Absolutely freaking brilliant blog entry on the subject.

I'm going to MAKE my students read it. Every. Single one.

That said....

I have NOT had a "plan B" since I made the decision 22 years ago (after 10 years of juggling day jobs and music), to play full time. Period. No matter what.

In the beginning, I wanted to be a rock star, guitar "hero" (before there was such a designation, or video game); then I fell in love with jazz, then fusion, then orchestral music....

For a while, I was a "jazz snob" and would only play jazz gigs....

I made $500.00 playing music that year. The following year, I then took on the attitude of saying "yes" to everything.... I made $60,000 that year (results not typical, LOL).

Right now, current times... I will arrange, compose, orchestrate a huge commissioned piece (for GREAT $$), go off and teach 8 students a night theory to Beatles to "Smoke on the Water" that day, and the next day go off and play a live gig where I play everything from Lady Gaga, Ke$ha, Bruno Mars, Gotye, ACDC, Evanescence (for GOOD $$)...then a jazz gig doing everything from Chick Corea, Wayne Shorter, Oliver Nelson (for decent $$); then come home and simply write or record some piece or solo over a track, for enjoyment, or to challenge myself (for free); then record some guitar tracks for somebody like bassist Ray Reindeau (bassist for Dream Theater's vocalist James LaBrie), and it goes on and on.....

For me.... it is how I pay my bills. I cannot EVER drop my guard or blink for one second, or I don't eat.

I wouldn't have it any other way.


#33
Quote by will42
I would also like to point out that being able to work with other musicians is a very important part of careers in the music business. If you take any criticism as a personal insult, or refuse to adapt your style to the situation, then it will be much harder to get jobs than someone who is easier to work with.


Indeed.


#34
I have a question Scott. How often are you required to read sheet music on the spot and in what situations is it more/less common?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#35
Quote by AlanHB
I have a question Scott. How often are you required to read sheet music on the spot and in what situations is it more/less common?


this is a good question. any pro giggers i've met (though they didn't play rock instruments) usually had plenty of time to learn the music ahead of time, and the only real time they resorted to sight reading was from juggling several gigs at once rather than a legitimate requirement

outside of auditions, at least
Quote by theogonia777
Hail killed MT

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#36
Quote by AlanHB
I have a question Scott. How often are you required to read sheet music on the spot and in what situations is it more/less common?


I have always sight read, in some way, on just about every gig I've ever played (except blues gigs: never; and some rock gigs: where I just had to memorize 45 songs in three days, and had no time to even chart anything out, or when I'm jumping in for someone at the last minute).

--------------

Although, specifically, on one gig in particular....

When I was at the mega church for 18 years, I sight read (past tense) every single time I was on stage.

And in the few years I was just the guitarist there, leading up to becoming the arranger/music director, I would literally wait to look at the music until I got there (on purpose to sharpen my reading chops).

My thinking was that I wanted to challenge myself to read it down.

We'd get recordings and charts (done by the Arranger, early on, or myself later, in Finale) a week in advance, I'd listen through them once to make sure there weren't any crazy surprises (work on those should they exist), then I let it go until the drive in, listen again on the way, then read it down once there. (There were always 2 instrumentals written every week that were brand new, which I HAD to read no matter what). The band was filled with top notch session and live players, so I really had to keep up.

Once I became the guy writing all the music out or arranging it from scratch (plus playing it live), I had a leg up, from the inside, on all the music. From that point, I knew every note, rhythm, chord, harmony, from every member of the band (or orchestra) and every vocalist, because I had transcribed/arranged it all.

We had ample rehearsal time, with the singers having 2 rehearsals 2 weeks in advance; but the band came together the day of the first live service, three hours in advance. We'd basically all read it down, merging with the vocalists, at that point.

(So you get an idea of the kind of gig the church thing was, here's a link to some of my work from that time. My arrangements/transcriptions here. My playing. [We also played with tracks, that I recorded/produced to cover secondary guitar parts, extra keys, drum loops, etc] Some instrumentals here, some with vocals):

http://soundcloud.com/scottjonesmusic/sets/sj-live-worship/

--------------

Then, (though much of the jazz world stresses memorizing tunes), on jazz gigs, I have always read from the Real Book, or whatever, primarily because I simply don't give a rat what anyone thinks of whether or not I memorized 4000 standards, i just want to play well, and not forgot the changes or melody, so I have always read in those situations.

--------------

Sessions, when they happened in studios (for me, I do most of my tracks for people in my own studio and send them tracks, many of which I just hear my way through).

But back in the day, there would be charts sometimes.

-------------

The cover band I'm in now, I am able to read my quick, handwritten, lead sheets from my iPad and use those on about 8 out of 40 tunes in a night.

(We NEVER rehearse. We all learn are parts on our own time and process, given a few days before the gig, and the first time we EVER hit them together is live).

I hate over thinking or over working a song, so I literally wait until the morning of the gig, whether we have 1 or 4 songs, chart them out really quickly (each song taking about 10 minutes); play through them once, reading the chart to check for mistakes, work on a solo, or whatever; then scan them into my iPad, and let it go until that night.

I'll listen to the songs on the way to get them in my head.

Thats it. All live that night.

Once we've hit the new songs a few times, live, I try and get off the chart. Since we learn 4, sometimes up to 10, songs a week, I'm pretty much always reading something.

--------------

Of course, if someone REALLY wants me to memorize everything, I do it. But for efficiency and accuracy, and because of the high volume of new material, I'd RATHER read.

--------------

MANY gigs that I've done, I haven't read one thing. I'd learn the songs by ear on stage, in the moment, and just go with it.

--------------

Others, I do are pick up gigs, subbing for the regular guy, and I'll just go in and hear my way through it, unless it is specified to prepare more in advance.

--------------

My opinion, at the end of the day, is be ABLE to read, AND be able to hear it live, AND be able to memorize. EACH are skills VITAL to survival in the gigging world.


#37
Quote by cdgraves
I'd love to get work doing commercial music, as a player or arranger. What are some basic genres, styles, or techniques a session/commercial guitarist should demonstrate on a Demo?


I'd be able to demonstrate as many common styles as possible. The more artsy stuff is fine for stretching your own playing or arranging, but it's less likely to be the thing that gets you the paying work.

I have written or played just about everything, stylistically. Some because it was required, some because I wanted to see if I could pull it off.

I, personally, put it ALL out there on my soundcloud, but should I send out a demo (doesn't really happen anymore), then I would pair it down to a short demo with my strongest, most commonly used abilities, hitting immediately.

You should truly try to immerse yourself in as much music from as many places as possible.

You'd rather not be caught off guard when asked to play or write a certain way.


#38
Earlier you said you couldn't drop your guard down or you wouldn't eat, I take it that's an exaggeration? You must have savings to fall back on, seems like a dangerous way to live...
Gear:

Gibson 2005 Les Paul Standard
Fender Road Worn Strat w/ Noiseless pickups
Marshall JCM 2000 401C
Marshall Vintage Modern 2266
Marshall 1960A cab (Dave Hill from Slade's old cab)
Ibanez TS9DX
EHX Little Big Muff
Freshman Acoustic
#39
Quote by ProphetToJables
Earlier you said you couldn't drop your guard down or you wouldn't eat, I take it that's an exaggeration? You must have savings to fall back on, seems like a dangerous way to live...


Of course it's an exaggeration, but this IS all I do for a living. I have to be diligent and stay in the game if I want this to continue to be my main source of income into the distant future.

I can't see myself playing guitar in a cover band into my old age, so I'll always have composing and orchestrating, arranging and teaching. The key is to not put all of your eggs in one basket.


Last edited by Scott Jones at Jan 14, 2013,
#40
you don't exactly have a boss to call sick days in. you get the flu, you're f'd in the a. no matter how fiscally responsible you are, how well you save, you're never gonna be invincible when you have the level of career control that's afforded to an independent musician.
Quote by theogonia777
Hail killed MT

Quote by jongtr
I want to be Hail when I grow up.
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