#1
So now that I've mastered a few scales (mostly pentatonic, chromatic, etc.) I was wondering if there are any scales which seem to be more "metal". I've been playing a lot of songs off of tabs and it looks like they're working off of a way different scale and I think that if I could master these scales I could not only nail the solos of the songs I'm learning, but make some of them my own and start writing my own solos with greater success. Mostly I listen to power and progressive metal (Manowar, Iron Maiden, and Iced Earth being the most prime examples of what I play). It's also likely that there's a ton of different scales. Also if anyone knows of any other good exercises to help bring up the finger-speed for some serious metalization I'd be glad to hear it. Thanks all.
#4
Quote by ObiMcD
It's also likely that there's a ton of different scales.

Just minor. You'd be surprised at how many people utilize this simple scale. Fyi, people depend more on creativity than a certain type of scale to play the way they do; in this case, Metal.
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#7
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byzantine scale is made of win.

Seriously, have you ever heard of any songs that use this scale?
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#8
Scales don't determine the sound, the player does. Metal can be played in pretty much any key (I've heard metal in Lydian). Scales just add different flavors. A lot of metal is played in Phrygian, and Aeolian, and often times they'll just play in a blues scale (ala Pantera).
#10
^ i would love to see you pinch harmonic the 24 fret high E and make it ring properly.....


But metal can adopt any tonality, Jazz ideas are frequently used, for example like chromatic passing notes pop up all over the place when moving positions. Harmonic minor, like used in more virtuosic classical music is great for ascending/descending swept arpeggios.
Phyrgian and Aeolian have already been mentioned, Diminished scales are interesting to incorporate as are your whole tone scales. I use whole tonal ideas in tapping to help make interesting wide intervals.
#11
Natural Minor works for pretty much everything. Here's the way I play it: three notes per string without changing positions. In E:



E Natural Minor

e - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 12 14 15 - 
B - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 12 13 15 - - - - - 
G - - - - - - - - - - - - - 12 14 16 - - - - - - - - - - 
D - - - - - - - - - 12 14 16 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 
A - - - - - 12 14 15 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 
E - 12 14 15 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 


Work on learning it all over the neck, and being able to work it all over. I'm doing that right now.

Oh, and diminished sounds good when you use it over a turnaround. I realize that the turnaround is more of a blues or jazz kind of thing, but a lot of metal solo sections feature some sort of turnaround. Or even just a section that has more tension than usual.
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Last edited by Sonicxlover at Apr 9, 2008,
#13
Quote by CowboyUp
Scales don't determine the sound, the player does. Metal can be played in pretty much any key (I've heard metal in Lydian). Scales just add different flavors. A lot of metal is played in Phrygian, and Aeolian, and often times they'll just play in a blues scale (ala Pantera).

Did my brain explode or is that incorrect?.....If I'm not mistaken, the key would be a single note which would tell you what keys you could use.....I ****ing suck at theory and I've been in Band like 4 years.
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#15
Yeah pretty much what everyone else said, it's not the scale you use it's how you use it. However, there are some scales that seem to sound better for metal, for example the natural minor, Phrygian mode, Phrygian Dominant, Harmonic Minor, and that's all I can think of for now.
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#16
Quote by J.A.M
Seriously, have you ever heard of any songs that use this scale?
no, which is exactly why I mentioned it. It's a very unique sounding scale that's hardly ever used. I'd like to see more people use it.
#17
^^
Could you tab out this scale you speak of?
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#18
Quote by CNC-Digity
^^
Could you tab out this scale you speak of?

1,b2,3,4,5,b6,7. You can look at it as Phrygian Dominant with a major seventh.
#19
Quote by :-D
1,b2,3,4,5,b6,7. You can look at it as Phrygian Dominant with a major seventh.
That defeats the purpose of the phrygian dominant. Its meant to be played over the V7 chord after an i chord...

And T/S
Learn to use phrasing, better note choice and guitar tone. DONT go looking for new scales.
#21
Just learn a lot of scales and learn to apply them in a general musical context. Then apply them to metal when you're familiar with them.
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