#1
I've decided I haven't been putting enough time into REALLY practicing, and I wanna make a chart/schedule/log/thingy. I know of a few things I need to work on (ear training, sight reading, improv-ing, writing, etc.), but more suggestions are welcome and/or needed. Also, I need tips on how to make a really good schedule on what to work on, for how long, etc....I'm sad to say, I'm kind of new to decent practice regimes, so I dunno where to start


Sorry for the n00bishness, and let me know if this is in the wrong forum...Seemed like the right one
My gear:
Schecter C-1+ w/ Seymour duncan Jazz (neck) and Full Shred (bridge), with Sperzels
B-52 LG-100A 4x12 half stack
Rogue LX405 Bass
Yamaha classical
Some sort of acoustic Squier
Boss Flanger
Lyon Chorus
#2
right, always start off with a warm-up exercise, and some scales. play with a metronome, and work on techinques such as alternate-picking and hammer-ons/pull-offs etc. Then, work on any peices you really need to learn, practising until you can't play it wrong. maybe just learn one small section at a time, and focus on getting it good. then work on sight-reading or another skill you want to work on. for sight-reading, download some sheet music and learn to play it by writing out the notes at first and working out where they are on the instrument. for ear-training, pick an easy song that you don't already know how to play, and start off by deciding if it sounds happy or sad (major or minor) then work from there. This is also where you should study bits of theory and apply them to your instrument (eg learning intervals and what they sound like)

sorry for the length, but it should help. for the record, the longer you have to practise, the longer the warm-up should be (up to 10 mins). also, if you only have 10 mins to practise, then warm up for 30 secs and focus on the important stuff (ommitting scales and working on important peices for gigs/coursework etc) and MAYBE the stuff you aren't used to like sight-reading.

edit: improvising comes with theory knowledge, so that's where you need to learn scales, and different positions for the scales, notes on the fretboard etc. this then leads to writing songs, although you don't need to be a good improviser to write catchy music.
Quote by uvq
yeah fire him secretly... thats what im doing except im firing myself and secretly joining someone elses band

Quote by Jekkyl
If you get a virus by looking at porn, is it considered a sexually-transmitted disease?

Quote by DiveRightIn63
thanks for the compliment man!
Last edited by M.B.MetalTabber at Apr 9, 2008,
#3
Quote by M.B.MetalTabber
right, always start off with a warm-up exercise, and some scales. play with a metronome, and work on techinques such as alternate-picking and hammer-ons/pull-offs etc. Then, work on any peices you really need to learn, practising until you can't play it wrong. maybe just learn one small section at a time, and focus on getting it good. then work on sight-reading or another skill you want to work on. for sight-reading, download some sheet music and learn to play it by writing out the notes at first and working out where they are on the instrument. for ear-training, pick an easy song that you don't already know how to play, and start off by deciding if it sounds happy or sad (major or minor) then work from there. This is also where you should study bits of theory and apply them to your instrument (eg learning intervals and what they sound like)

sorry for the length, but it should help. for the record, the longer you have to practise, the longer the warm-up should be (up to 10 mins). also, if you only have 10 mins to practise, then warm up for 30 secs and focus on the important stuff (ommitting scales and working on important peices for gigs/coursework etc) and MAYBE the stuff you aren't used to like sight-reading.


Yup, I warm up with a chromatic exercise up til the 12th fret, then some major barre-chord string skipping, and some neo-classical sounding stuff, then a natural minor pull-off thing. I can read music OK, but not great. I always play with a metronome, also...I'm working on sweeping/tapping ATM, but I need to learn more theory and ear transcribing. What I really, REALLY need, is like, an idea for a written practice schedule, and what to work on and for how long. It's hard for me to explain what exactly I want...Hahaha. Thanks for your input, though, I appreciate it
My gear:
Schecter C-1+ w/ Seymour duncan Jazz (neck) and Full Shred (bridge), with Sperzels
B-52 LG-100A 4x12 half stack
Rogue LX405 Bass
Yamaha classical
Some sort of acoustic Squier
Boss Flanger
Lyon Chorus
#4
hmm, sounds like you want something like this then:

warm-up - 5 mins
scales and positions - 10 mins
techniques - 10 - 15 mins
important pieces - 10 - 20 mins
fun pieces - 10 mins
sight-reading - 10 mins
ear-training - 10 - 20 mins
theory - 10 - 20 mins

not exactly right, but if you have the time it probably works well.
Quote by uvq
yeah fire him secretly... thats what im doing except im firing myself and secretly joining someone elses band

Quote by Jekkyl
If you get a virus by looking at porn, is it considered a sexually-transmitted disease?

Quote by DiveRightIn63
thanks for the compliment man!
#5
Quote by M.B.MetalTabber
hmm, sounds like you want something like this then:

warm-up - 5 mins
scales and positions - 10 mins
techniques - 10 - 15 mins
important pieces - 10 - 20 mins
fun pieces - 10 mins
sight-reading - 10 mins
ear-training - 10 - 20 mins
theory - 10 - 20 mins

not exactly right, but if you have the time it probably works well.


Something like that, yeah. I have the time for the most part, so that works pretty well. What would you consider an "important piece"? Like a classical piece that would help with theory knowledge? Or something? And a fun piece would be like BTBAM?
My gear:
Schecter C-1+ w/ Seymour duncan Jazz (neck) and Full Shred (bridge), with Sperzels
B-52 LG-100A 4x12 half stack
Rogue LX405 Bass
Yamaha classical
Some sort of acoustic Squier
Boss Flanger
Lyon Chorus
#6
important peice = something you have a deadline to learn, because of college or gigs and you need to know it.

fun peice = something you want to learn, but don't need to.
Quote by uvq
yeah fire him secretly... thats what im doing except im firing myself and secretly joining someone elses band

Quote by Jekkyl
If you get a virus by looking at porn, is it considered a sexually-transmitted disease?

Quote by DiveRightIn63
thanks for the compliment man!
#8
Quote by SchecterC-1+Man
Yup, I warm up with a chromatic exercise up til the 12th fret, then some major barre-chord string skipping, and some neo-classical sounding stuff, then a natural minor pull-off thing. I can read music OK, but not great. I always play with a metronome, also...I'm working on sweeping/tapping ATM, but I need to learn more theory and ear transcribing. What I really, REALLY need, is like, an idea for a written practice schedule, and what to work on and for how long. It's hard for me to explain what exactly I want...Hahaha. Thanks for your input, though, I appreciate it



dont forget to spend some time on just playing music..... for the fun of it.


setting goals and having a set practice schedule can be helpful, but you have to be careful not to lose site of the true goal, which is to make music. Try to balance it if you can. Maybe even set aside a day or 2 every week where you just play.
shred is gaudy music
#9
Quote by jesus is punk N
foo guitar isnt math make it natural other wise yul end up hating guitar

So you're saying math isn't natural? Just because you independently practice something doesn't mean it's not fun, just that you have a desire to get better, which proves that you truly enjoy what you do.