#1
i was fooling around on the guitar while writing my first actually good song, and i stumbled upon a chord that sounds very squirrel nut zipper-ish. i play this song with a capo on the 4th fret. the chord is 323100. the notes in the chord are A, B, C, D#, and G#. if anyone can tell me what the name of this chord is and how you know, id be so happy, i have no idea what i am playing but i assure u the song is something im proud of, and im a perfectionist who just wrote his first song after playing for 16 years! yea i know im lame.
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#2
B13b9 ?

It's an extended and altered dominant chord.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#3
Quote by Galvanise69
Yeah, B13b9 is the easiest way to read it, of course you would have to know that your placing the 7th in the bass.

Nope, the B is in the bass. He has a capo on the fourth fret and wrote it as "3", indicating the seventh fret.

EDIT: Oh, TS, congratulations on writing the song. Better late than never.
#4
Aren't the notes B D# A C D# G# ?
1 3 b7 b9 13
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#5
Quote by Ænimus Prime
Aren't the notes B D# A C D# G# ?
1 3 b7 b9 13

Yep, I failed to take that into account as I just left the top two as open strings without a capo; guess I've been awake too long.

I fail completely...

EDIT: But then it wouldn't be B13b9, because that implies an eleventh is present. I'd call it B7b9add13.
Last edited by :-D at Apr 10, 2008,
#6
Quote by :-D
Yep, I failed to take that into account as I just left the top two as open strings without a capo; guess I've been awake too long.

I fail completely...

EDIT: But then it wouldn't be B13b9, because that implies an eleventh is present. I'd call it B7b9add13.


It's not at all uncommon for the 11th to be omitted for reasons of avoiding a "complete tonal cluster****" (I believe is the jazz terminology)
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Quote by Archeo Avis
It's not at all uncommon for the 11th to be omitted for reasons of avoiding a "complete tonal cluster****" (I believe is the jazz terminology)

Makes sense to an extent (that is the correct term by the way), but whenever I see X13 I'm immediately thinking it's directly connected to the rest of the chord (1 3 5 b7 9 11 13). I would use Xadd13 because it's a thirteenth being added to a ninth chord.
Last edited by :-D at Apr 10, 2008,
#8
^I'm pretty sure that if you have a seventh, you shouldn't call it an add chord.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#10
ed- wait a min, 2 b9 intervals

Wheres the other one?
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#12
Righto I see
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums