#1
Does anyone else find it impossible to play without a rhythm notation? If I don't have some kind of rhythm transcription, I can't count the beats and play with the metronome. I can figure out rhythm by myself but it takes me a while especially if there are syncopated 16th notes.

It also takes alot of concentration for me to play in time, I have to tap my foot, count, and feel the beat! But then I see pop stars singing, jumping ,and dancing at the same time. How can they stay sing on key and keep in time while doing all that!

Is there some kind of secret to playing in time,or it is it just a lot of practice. Or I am I just not musically talented?
#2
Sorry to say mate that practise is a huge part of it.

Also, pop stars mime xD They don't actually sing live
"Punk is a state of mind, and no one can take that away from you."
#3
you just need more practice, but most of the famous pop stars do mime like the guy above me said, but there are people that are just gifted and don't need to count out rhythm, it just flows out
#4
Practice is pretty much it. Its like a light bulb pops in your head one day and it just clicks for you. But its all putting in the time.
#5
Quote by Punks|Not|Dead


Also, pop stars mime xD They don't actually sing live


madonna actually sings live, but shes an exception to the rule.
#6
Quote by scarlet20
Does anyone else find it impossible to play without a rhythm notation? If I don't have some kind of rhythm transcription, I can't count the beats and play with the metronome. I can figure out rhythm by myself but it takes me a while especially if there are syncopated 16th notes.

It also takes alot of concentration for me to play in time, I have to tap my foot, count, and feel the beat! But then I see pop stars singing, jumping ,and dancing at the same time. How can they stay sing on key and keep in time while doing all that!

Is there some kind of secret to playing in time,or it is it just a lot of practice. Or I am I just not musically talented?


Well, first of all, without rhythm notation it's not really even music.

Personally, if I'm working out a song from music, I find working out the rhythm
notation painfully slow, excruciating work. However, it's GREAT work to do and
very worthwhile. So, kudos to you for actually doing it. The reason you think
some people make it look easy is they've either done the work, or they're playing
thier own internalized music which is different than trying to internalize someone
else's.

Another thing is, a lot of people simply guess at the rhythm and they never quite
get it right. Because it is work. Like anything else the more you do, the easier it
gets. Actually going through thru process of counting and making sure you're
hitting the notes exactly right, will ultimately give you the confidence in playing it
guessing never could.
#8
Quote by Punks|Not|Dead
Sorry to say mate that practise is a huge part of it.


when you ummm........memorize the song then *poof* when you think of it, it always play like the real one and when YOU play it, it would go easier
#9
Quote by scarlet20
Thanks I'll just keep practicing then!



There's an example in my profile of me playing "Yesterdays" which I used a
note-for-note transcription of Wes Montgomery's playing. I'd sometimes have
to spend an hour or more just working out 1 measure's rhythm to get it right. Still,
after a month or two of work on it, the recording has a number of sections that
are absolutely, horribly wrong.

It was still worth the effort and right now I couldn't play it to save my life as I
haven't touched it for 5 months (I always get diverted into something else). So,
I'd probably have to start *almost* from scratch again. Almost. In that "almost"
was the work I already did which made going thru it all worthwhile.
#10
Quote by edg
There's an example in my profile of me playing "Yesterdays" which I used a
note-for-note transcription of Wes Montgomery's playing. I'd sometimes have
to spend an hour or more just working out 1 measure's rhythm to get it right. Still,
after a month or two of work on it, the recording has a number of sections that
are absolutely, horribly wrong.

It was still worth the effort and right now I couldn't play it to save my life as I
haven't touched it for 5 months (I always get diverted into something else). So,
I'd probably have to start *almost* from scratch again. Almost. In that "almost"
was the work I already did which made going thru it all worthwhile.

yeah that jazz stuff can be a nightmare to work out because you have to deal with swing notes,syncopation and lots of melody. Luckily for me I mostly play jpop and nu metal. So I only have to work about about 10 measures,then loop it.
#11
It's not that bad. Most of the piece goes pretty easily but occaisonly you hit a
section with a sequence of triplets that have rests in it ... and that takes me time
to work out. The more you do the easier it gets. It's one of the things I don't
do often enough. Painstakingly working out rhythm I think does you more good
in the long run than equivalent time spent sweeping or 8 finger tapping. It
still all comes down to how much control you really want to have over what you want
to play.

I don't think Wes Montgomery was "seeing" triplets, and rests and whatnot while
he was playing, but I do believe he was EXACTLY aware where he was in a measure
and on which beat and which fraction of a beat without "guessing".