#1
Ok, I need some help. I've come up with a nice spacey riff which I want to use in my song, yet it's in 15/8. Ouch. I want to use drum machine, and no drum machine will make me a good sounding groove in 15/8, so I want to make it a bit simpler.

I think that I can break it down to two beats, one in 3/8 and second in 12/8 or 6/4, but it's still weird. Any other ideas how I could make it easier? I want to keep all the notes, of course.
Attachments:
riff.zip
#2
nevermind I thought that said 6/4. Whats so hard about 15/8?

You can do the drums in Guitar Pro.
#3
You could call it a bar of 9/8 followed by a bar of 6/8. Keep in mind that time signatures are not fractions, and that they won't actually have nine and six beats (respectively) per par. 9/8 has three beats per bar, with each beat being a dotted quarter note (or three eighth notes), and 6/8 has two beats per bar. 5/4 is generally counted 1 2 3 1 2 anyway, and since 15/8 has five beats per bar, breaking it down into 9/8 and 6/8 seems like the most logical solution.
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#6
nothing wrong with as far as I can see, you could of course just put it in 5/4 and play it in a faster pace and make em all triplets.
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#7
Quote by FretboardToAsh
nothing wrong with as far as I can see, you could of course just put it in 5/4 and play it in a faster pace and make em all triplets.


Hey, that's a good idea! I'll try that. Don't stop posting other suggestions, though
#8
Sorry to sound ignorant, but could you make it 15/16, that's easy enough.

Or would that not be a plausible solution.
#10
Don't make a riff based on triplets. If it's all triplets, you might as well use compound pulses.

I don't have guitar pro, so I can't look at your riff, but I'd recommend three bars of 5/8. There's really no need to write anything in 15/8, as it can be easily simplified. It's like writing a piece in 20/4 when it's really just 5 measures of a 4/4 rhythm.
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#11
Quote by Muphin
There's really no need to write anything in 15/8, as it can be easily simplified.
Wrong-O. 15/8 is a completely valid time signature; it represents triplets in 5/4 time.
#13
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Wrong-O. 15/8 is a completely valid time signature; it represents triplets in 5/4 time.


How do you mean? Something like this?

1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3
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#14
Quote by Muphin
How do you mean? Something like this?

1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3


15/8 is to 5/4 as 6/8 is to 2/4.
EDIT:
Yes, or

1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3
#15
Quote by National_Anthem
15/8 is to 5/4 as 6/8 is to 2/4.


The two cannot be compared. 6/x and 2/x are both duple meters, meaning 6/x is indeed the compound equivalent of 2/4. However, 5/x is a hybrid meter, meaning it combines simple and compound pulses. You are saying 15/x is a compound meter, and you cannot give a hybrid meter a compound equivalent. Your statement is false in theory.

Of course, 15/x can be put in to practice, but I would write it as something like this:

9/x + 6/x
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#16
Dude I just looked at your riff and you ****ed up the timing!

It's a 2/4 riff: 8th,16th, 16th, and the rest all 8ths. then repeat

Its' a 4/4 riff if you repeat it twice!
#17
Quote by zombiak
I know I can, yet my drum machine (EZdrummer) doesn't take MIDIs created in Guitar Pro too well, they sound inhuman and synthetic because Guitar Pro can't handle accents etc.


are you using ezdrummer in a DAW? ive used ezdrummer in logic and logic was the only limiting factor.

15/8.. ive used that time sig before. a lot of it was 3 sets of 5/4, but in some areas there were 3 against 5 polyrhythms. a lot of it wasnt true 15/8 but writing it out in 15/8 was a lot easier than having to change time sigs every few beats.

technically speaking, if you had 5/4 with triplet feel it would be 15/8, just like 3/4 with triplet feel equates to 12/8.
#18
Quote by Sabaren
you had 5/4 with triplet feel it would be 15/8, just like 3/4 with triplet feel equates to 12/8.


3/4--->9/8
4/4--->12/8

I don't know which way you meant, but what you posted is incorrect.
#21
I always thought 5/4 was 1 2 3 4 5

And 15/8 was 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

Its a little different.
#22
Quote by isaac_bandits
I always thought 5/4 was 1 2 3 4 5

And 15/8 was 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

Its a little different.


couldn't 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 simply be thought of as five bars of 3/2?
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#23
Quote by seedmole
couldn't 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 simply be thought of as five bars of 3/2?
Don't think of things in five bars, or at least try to make it so you use an even number of measures for a given riff. It isn't mandatory, but most riffs are an even number of measures, and usually in y=2^x form, where y is the number of measures and x is an integer greater than zero.