#1
will lowering the action on an acoustic guitar lower the quality of the sound? I lowered the action a bit yesterday and it sounds slightly different, might just be in my mind though, does this happen?
#3
yes absolutely when you move the strings closer and further away from the sound hole you will get a change in tone and yes it kinda depends on how good your ear is some people can tell if there guitar is a few cents outta tune from one strum i cant im tonedeaf lol. thats why i dont sing.
#4
No. The sound is caused by vibration of the string which is transferred to the guitar by the bridge. Raising and lowering the string has no effect whatsoever on the sound.
#5
Quote by Guitar Hack
No. The sound is caused by vibration of the string which is transferred to the guitar by the bridge. Raising and lowering the string has no effect whatsoever on the sound.


That would be correct.
#6
Quote by Guitar Hack
No. The sound is caused by vibration of the string which is transferred to the guitar by the bridge. Raising and lowering the string has no effect whatsoever on the sound.


Yes -- but if you filed the saddle or the nut and either are not making full contact with the wood, it will affect the quality of the guitar's tone. It isn't the height of the strings.
#7
well i still disagree, adjust your neck releif so its not optimum and retune. play it then put it back. i hear a deffinite difference maybe its just me

Edit: so i didnt sound like a jerk with my original post.
Last edited by anita prs bad at Apr 13, 2008,
#8
Quote by anita prs bad
well i still disagree, adjust your neck releif so its not optimum and retune. play it then put it back if you cant here a difference then you more tone deaf than me!

I think you're confusing two different things. The original poster wants to know if changing the action will affect the TONE of the instrument, not whether or not it will put the guitar out of tune.

The phrase "tone deaf" doesn't use the word "tone" in the way we do when we refer to the tone of a particular guitar, so maybe that's what's causing your confusion. Being "tone deaf" means having an inordinate inability to differentiate between different "tones," meaning different frequencies of sound. That's why people who are tone deaf are unable to sing, two different notes can sound exactly the same to them so they have trouble hearing when they've slipped out of tune.

Referring to the "tone" of an instrument means the quality of its range and the character of its overall sound (bassy/tinny? mellow/bright?). So, saying that a guitar has a nice tone is NOT the same as saying that a guitar is in tune. A guitar can have beautiful tone despite being out of tune. A guitar with crappy tone will have crappy tone no matter how well tuned it is.
#9
Quote by sunshowers
I think you're confusing two different things. The original poster wants to know if changing the action will affect the TONE of the instrument, not whether or not it will put the guitar out of tune.

The phrase "tone deaf" doesn't use the word "tone" in the way we do when we refer to the tone of a particular guitar, so maybe that's what's causing your confusion. Being "tone deaf" means having an inordinate inability to differentiate between different "tones," meaning different frequencies of sound. That's why people who are tone deaf are unable to sing, two different notes can sound exactly the same to them so they have trouble hearing when they've slipped out of tune.

Referring to the "tone" of an instrument means the quality of its range and the character of its overall sound (bassy/tinny? mellow/bright?). So, saying that a guitar has a nice tone is NOT the same as saying that a guitar is in tune. A guitar can have beautiful tone despite being out of tune. A guitar with crappy tone will have crappy tone no matter how well tuned it is.


True -- and maybe we should have been a little more clear and used the word 'timbre" and avoided any confusion.
#10
Quote by sunshowers
I think you're confusing two different things. The original poster wants to know if changing the action will affect the TONE of the instrument, not whether or not it will put the guitar out of tune.

The phrase "tone deaf" doesn't use the word "tone" in the way we do when we refer to the tone of a particular guitar, so maybe that's what's causing your confusion. Being "tone deaf" means having an inordinate inability to differentiate between different "tones," meaning different frequencies of sound. That's why people who are tone deaf are unable to sing, two different notes can sound exactly the same to them so they have trouble hearing when they've slipped out of tune.

Referring to the "tone" of an instrument means the quality of its range and the character of its overall sound (bassy/tinny? mellow/bright?). So, saying that a guitar has a nice tone is NOT the same as saying that a guitar is in tune. A guitar can have beautiful tone despite being out of tune. A guitar with crappy tone will have crappy tone no matter how well tuned it is.



1. just to clarify my missworded statement. i never ment to imply that changing the hieght of the strings would change the tune of the insturment. The statement was made to say that some people have a "better ear" and can hear the subtle differences that happen when you raise and lower your strings.

my gigging musicain freind can hear when his guitar is just a few cents of on any given string from just one strum (he has relative perfect pitch) i on the other hand have to use my tuner to get it in perfect tune. His ear is far more trained and more sensitive to mine however even with my untrained ear i deffinitly heard a change in tone from my guitar when i put in a new saddle (same material tusq just slightly lower than previous) and reset neck relief there was a deffinite difference in the sound of the guitar.

this may be explained by reasons other than changing the height of the strings but that was the only adjustment i made so in my opinoin taken from personal experience it DID change the sound of the guitar.