#1
ok ,, so csus2 is x3001x :
by removing or replacing the e notes (3rd) then adding the 2nd which is a D note.


now what if i only remove one e note (instead of both) in a C chord and replace it with a D note, to make,

x30010 ( same as csus2 only now the high e string is now open) . now i have the root, 3rd, 5th, and added the second . wouldnt this be a cadd2? based on what i understand on theory it seems it would, but i havent seen this chord on any chord charts. so im wondering if i did something wrong .
#2
Csus2 - 1 2 5 - C D G
Cadd9 - 1 3 5 9 - C E G D
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#4
Quote by Ænimus Prime
Csus2 - 1 2 5 - C D G
Cadd9 - 1 3 5 9 - C E G D



not really sure what this has to do with anything . not asking about cadd9 , im adding the second , not the 9th

the chord is x30010 = x, root, 2nd, 3rd, root, 5th
Last edited by Findinghomer at Apr 10, 2008,
#6
It's only a ninth when a seventh is added.
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#9
so, the second and ninth of a C major scale is a D note. how do you distinguish if you would call it a Cadd9 or Cadd2?


x30010 = x, root, 2nd (or ninth), 3rd, root, 5th

is this going to be a cadd9 or a cadd2 and why?
#11
You would always call it 9.

An addition of a 9th/2nd or a 13th/6th is always called by the higher octave by convention. If you add the 6th to a chord, it is called a 6 chord (ex. G6). If a seventh is involved, then you call it by the higher octave. If it is a sus chord, you call it sus4 or sus2, not sus11 or sus9.
#12
Quote by GITARdud391
^Well doesn't it have to do with what octave you use?



i would say so, since im using the open D note, rather than the octave d note on the b string , as in a cadd9, i would say this chord is a cadd2. but the first two replies said other wise. so im trying to understand this.
Last edited by Findinghomer at Apr 13, 2008,
#13
^You always use the 9 rather than the 2 in this scenario. That's just the convention.


I mean, wouldn't it be crazy to talk about a Cadd16 chord if the extension is really high? You would just call it Cadd9.
#14
The 2nd and the 9th are not the EXACT same note. The 9th is one octave higher than the 2nd. The only time it's really important to know the difference is when talking about harmony. Someone might say " it's harmonized in 10ths" Which is one octave higher than the 3rd. But they would be the same note as in E is E.
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#15
Quote by bshizzle911
The 2nd and the 9th are not the EXACT same note. The 9th is one octave higher than the 2nd. The only time it's really important to know the difference is when talking about harmony. Someone might say " it's harmonized in 10ths" Which is one octave higher than the 3rd. But they would be the same note as in E is E.
They are different intervals, but when naming chords, you always say 9, not 2.
#16
Quote by bshizzle911
The 2nd and the 9th are not the EXACT same note. The 9th is one octave higher than the 2nd. The only time it's really important to know the difference is when talking about harmony. Someone might say " it's harmonized in 10ths" Which is one octave higher than the 3rd. But they would be the same note as in E is E.



well know its not the same note, thats my point. since im using open D, not the octave d as in cadd9 , seems the chord would be cadd2, not cadd9.
#17
Quote by Findinghomer
seems the chord would be cadd2, not cadd9.
It seems that way, but that's just not what you do. It's Cadd9.

Edit: No, I'm wrong. Your chord lacks E, the third, so it's Csus2. You use the lower octave when it's a sus chord.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Apr 13, 2008,
#18
Quote by bangoodcharlote
It seems that way, but that's just not what you do. It's Cadd9.

Edit: No, I'm wrong. Your chord lacks E, the third, so it's Csus2. You use the lower octave when it's a sus chord.



nope, my chord is a csus2 PLUS the open E note. csus2 would be x3001x. so essentially im using csus2 but NOT removing the e. just trying to figure out what i would call that, thats why im here i came up with cadd2. since im adding the second but not replacing the 3rd.
#19
Quote by Findinghomer
nope, my chord is a csus2 PLUS the open E note. csus2 would be x3001x. so essentially im using csus2 but NOT removing the e. just trying to figure out what i would call that, thats why im here i came up with cadd2. since im adding the second but not replacing the 3rd.


If your not replacing the 3rd.... its Cadd9

1-3-5-9
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#20
ok so for add chords, the higher tonal name is used, and sus chords , lower? regardless of how the chord is built?
#21
Quote by Findinghomer
ok so for add chords, the higher tonal name is used, and sus chords , lower? regardless of how the chord is built?


well sus chords deal with replacing the 3rd with either the 2 or the 4

sus 2 = 1 2 5
sus 4 = 1 4 5

add chords deal with adding an upper extension to a triad

add 9 = 1 3 5 9


it doesnt really matter what octave the "9" is in.
basically the add 9 is used to differentiate between a 9th chord which includes the 7th, and a triad with no 7th that has the 9th added.

9 chord = 1 3 5 7 9 ( standard 9th chord which includes the 7th)
add 9 = 1 3 5 9 (triad + an "added" 9th)
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 13, 2008,
#22
^Munky, a 9 chord will have a b7 and be 1 3 5 b7 9. What you posted is maj9.

Quote by Findinghomer
nope, my chord is a csus2 PLUS the open E note. csus2 would be x3001x. so essentially im using csus2 but NOT removing the e. just trying to figure out what i would call that, thats why im here i came up with cadd2. since im adding the second but not replacing the 3rd.
You're right. I only saw the priginal chord you posted at the top, which you correctly labeled as Csus2. My bad.
#23
Quote by bangoodcharlote
^Munky, a 9 chord will have a b7 and be 1 3 5 b7 9. What you posted is maj9.

You're right. I only saw the priginal chord you posted at the top, which you correctly labeled as Csus2. My bad.


A dominant 9th will have b7.....

I wasnt specifying type. It wasnt necessary as Im just explaining the difference between 9th chords (which include a 7th.... whatever 7th is appropriate for the chord)...... and add 9th chords which are triads with an added 9th.

if you want to get into specific types:

1 3 5 b7 9 = dominant 9th
1 b3 5 b7 9 = minor 9th
1 3 5 7 9 = Major 9th
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#25
Quote by bangoodcharlote
If you just say that something is a 9 chord (ex. G9 C9 A9) then the dominant seventh is implied.


thanks, I never knew that.


I didnt specify the 7th... because I wasnt specifying the type of 9th chord. I was simply differentiating between 9th chords ( as in ANY type of 9th chord) and add 9 chords.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 13, 2008,
#26
Quote by Findinghomer
ok so for add chords, the higher tonal name is used, and sus chords , lower? regardless of how the chord is built?

If there's a second instead of a third, it's sus2. If there's a fourth instead of a third, it's sus4.
#27
Quote by GuitarMunky
9 chord = 1 3 5 7 9


That does specify the seventh though. That specifically says that a 9 chord has the intervals of perfect unison, major third, perfect fifth, major seventh, and major ninth. But, it doesn't. A 9 chord has perfect unison, major third, perfect fifth, minor seventh, and major ninth.

Not to be a stickler or anything, but it might confuse people if they're used to the convention that a G9, for example, is the same thing as a Gdom9 (which is the convention).
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#28
Quote by seedmole
Not to be a stickler or anything, but it might confuse people if they're used to the convention that a G9, for example, is the same thing as a Gdom9 (which is the convention).

I think this is where the problem arose, and that's all BGC was pointing out. No need to get bent out of shape, Munky.
#30
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I think his intention was to say that a "_9" chord contains some kind of third, some kind of fifth, some kind of 7th, and some kind of ninth.


Still, even if he had said "_9," that would make it seem like 9. I guess this is just one of those problems with labeling in music theory, like how, in certain circles, a _sus chord (as in sus) implies 7sus4.
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#32
Quote by bangoodcharlote
The blank was to imply that it could be X7, Xmaj7, Xm/maj7. I should have made that more clear.


Yeah, I figured as much. I'm just trying to demonstrate how the meanings could easily be missed if you're not really specific with notation.

Also, I guess this could be a lesson on how important music theory is. If there aren't any widely-accepted names for things, then discussions would always get interrupted by this type of distraction.
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