#1
Okay, im still learning much songwriting theory. I am just stuck here, i looked up all the inversions for these chords but they dont appear as inversions. Ill show you what chords im using.


e|----0-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
B|----0-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
G|----4-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
D|----2-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
A|----2-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
E|----4----------------------------------------------------------------------|

So in that one there, i searched in a chord namer and it game up with E major/G#. Now G# is in the key of E.. so could i just call that an inverted E major, or is there official inversions, like set inversions already?

Next chord


e|----0-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
B|----0-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
G|----2-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
D|----2-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
A|----4-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
E|----4----------------------------------------------------------------------|

G#C#E A B E - thats the notes im using there.

So couldnt i just go E major add 4 to make that chord? Like can i mix up the note order in which i play, to appropriately name the chord instead of like G # flat sus sus cheese 11 flat ninth omit 2 and stuff like that


Thanks guys

peace
#2
Pretty sure the first chord is Emaj 1st inversion (G# is lowest not, followed by B and E)

Second one's trickier but it's an Amaj9

(it's got E major chord in it, but also A major...so when you get chords like that just see what works and what doesn' if you get my meaning. Like, if you based it as an Emajor something chord, you'd be adding the 4th and 6th which just complicates matters, so best to see if there's a way of 'dumbing it down')
Last edited by Rock God #1 at Apr 11, 2008,
#5
Quote by Rock God #1
Pretty sure the first chord is Emaj 1st inversion (G# is lowest not, followed by B and E)

Second one's trickier but it's an Amaj9

(it's got E major chord in it, but also A major...so when you get chords like that just see what works and what doesn' if you get my meaning. Like, if you based it as an Emajor something chord, you'd be adding the 4th and 6th which just complicates matters, so best to see if there's a way of 'dumbing it down')


ahh okay so your basically saying, it depends what context its in, IE what other chords are in the song, you base it on that to name the chord?
#6
yeah...i'm not an expert on chord-finding theory, but chords can have many different names depending on what's in them, like that second chord you posted...you could call it Emajor something, but it's so much simpler to locate the Amaj chord and base it around that
#7
Okay sweet, another question for you bro. Inversions, how do i recognise which inversion is 1st, which one is 2nd, 3rd... etc.!

cheers
#8
right...

take C major (for no particular reason, just because it's simple)

When C, E and G are played as a chord, C bein the lowest and G being the highest of the notes, this is the chord in it's root position.

As an inversion, we would write it as: 5
-----------------------------------------------------3

This is because there is an interval of a third between C and E, and an interval of a fifth between C and G

1st inversion:

the E from the Cmaj chord becomes the lowest note, with G and C stacked on top (C being the highest note). We could write it as: 6
----------------------------------------------------3


This is because there is an interval of a third between E and G, and an interval of a 6th between E and C

2nd inversion:

the G from the Cmaj chord becomes the lowest note, with C and E stacked on top (E being the highest note). We could write it as: 6
----------------------------------------------------4

This is because there is an interval of a fourth between G and C, and an interval of a 6th between G and E.

And that's it for the inversions of a triad chord.

Third inversions exist only for chords with 4 four or more notes in them (like maj7th's, etc.)