#1
Hah, I love this one.

The band I'm in is considering playing at a local coffee shop. It's fairly small, maybe a 50 person limit in the room we'd be in, but a paying gig is a paying gig.

The problem that we have is with the room size, the drums will likely be far, far too loud - even if the drummer just mellows out a bit.

So, does anyone have any suggestions for volume control on drums? Anything that you've used and actually worked?

Thanks, ya'll.
#2
Replace drums with buckets xD

but um tell him to try and avoid the floor toms and stick to high hat and snare but softly =/
"Punk is a state of mind, and no one can take that away from you."
#4
Quote by Punks|Not|Dead
but um tell him to try and avoid the floor toms and stick to high hat and snare but softly =/

Yeah, I'll do that.

What about using brushes and cymbal mutes? They don't really help with the kick too much, but would that be a start?

#5
Remove the bottom skins, and use some judicious taping on the drumheads to reduce the resonance. Stick plenty of fabric in the bass drum, right up against the skin.

There's little you can do about cymbals though unfortunately - experiment with bits of neoprene foam or rubber to reduce the overall volume without affecting the sound too much. Also, get your drummer to use brushes.
#7
I'm a drummer. Tell your drummer to use brushes instead of sticks. It basically sounds the same and the volume level is perfect.
#8
Quote by fafinaf
use brushes


yeah you could, but it'll leave black on your skins, which is ****in' annoyin.

i think you should just put a ****load of blankets + pillows in your bass drum, that should make that heaps quiet.

as for the toms, you <b> could </b> put practise pads on them but you'd probably look like retards if you did that.

Or you could just not take the toms.

thats wat i'd do.
#9
I'm not sure if this will work or not, but it's an idea. You could somehow secure a bunch of fabric inside the toms and on the bottom of the cymbals. I'm not sure how it will work, just a thought.
"There is no hell. There is only France." - Frank Zappa
#10
Play an acoustic set & use tambourines and other such quirky percussive instruments?

A coffee shop isnt the best place for a rock-out set.
#11
We play our hard rock grunge songs at coffee shops but we tone them down and make them acoustic. We normally have the guitars acoustic and I (the drummer) use brushes without any muting at all and it sounds just the perfect volume, it doesn't leave any marks on my skins at all, maybe you have brushes that do, but mine don't at all. I have plastic brushes as opposed to metal or other material. I would advise against muting the drums as this will probably sound bad. I usually just bring my snare, hi hat, ride and a floor tom. Theres no need for a huge booming bass in a coffee shop.
#12
I think you might be worrying a bit too much. Do you actually KNOW that the drums will be too loud, or are you just guessing? My band played in a small "theater" area that only had about 25 seats. The drum volume was fine.

But if your just playing background-type music, any rock band is going to be too loud. You'll probably have to go acoustic.
#13
Quote by Punks|Not|Dead
Replace drums with buckets


ROFL.
Y'know, I'm pretty sure that if I tried that with our drummer, he wouldn't even notice.


TS. Try filling all his drum shells with padding, like blankets towels ect.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Apr 13, 2008,
#15
Quote by altgrunge
We play our hard rock grunge songs at coffee shops but we tone them down and make them acoustic. We normally have the guitars acoustic and I (the drummer) use brushes without any muting at all and it sounds just the perfect volume, it doesn't leave any marks on my skins at all, maybe you have brushes that do, but mine don't at all. I have plastic brushes as opposed to metal or other material. I would advise against muting the drums as this will probably sound bad. I usually just bring my snare, hi hat, ride and a floor tom. Theres no need for a huge booming bass in a coffee shop.


yeah that'd actually work, i had metal ones.
#16
Fruen,
Have your drummer invest in a Cajon. It is a sit-on "drum box" with a sound hole in the back... They sound awesome. Rock on, Brother.
Dish
#17
Time to bust out the bongos/congas/tambourines/other percussion instruments.

Might as well turn it into an awesome semi-acoustic set.

You all know that congas are the best instrument ever.
#18
he could try dowel sticks..

they sound a bit different and a bit clicky.. but they're still much quieter.

Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#19
My dad's a professional drummer. I used to play bass with his jazz band in a coffee shop. He just stuck to a small and basic kit, and used brushes. He also used his normal sticks. Basically, if your drummer is good enough to control his volume and dynamics, and not hammer the crap out of the drums like punks these days, you guys should be fine.