#1
In school today, I was creating different scales which deviate from the normal pentatonic and heptatonic ones. One I particularly enjoyed was decatonic. I was originally aiming for a enneatonic scale, but I enjoy the symmetry in the deca.

In tablature:
   E E  E  E E E  E  E    E  E H..
e|----------------------|-----------------|
B|----------------------|-----------------|
G|----------------------|-----------------|
D|-------------------6--|-8--9-10---------|
A|---------7-8-9--10----|-----------------|
E|-8-9--10--------------|-----------------|
   C C# D  E F F# G  G#   A# B C


Anyone like it? I'm really not expecting people to, but I'm a stickler for chromaticism. Sure, it isn't totally chromatic, but still.

EDIT: Sorry about that, forgot to give the formula for it.

Formula:
1, b2, 2, 3, 4, TT, 5, b6, b7, 7
#3
(not responding to you but that guys sig) there is to a such thing as a E# and B#...you just havent gotten far enough in music theory yet

EDIT: haha my bad, i didnt bother looking of your other stuff.
Last edited by Lamrick21 at Apr 11, 2008,
#4
Quote by Lamrick21
(not responding to you but that guys sig) there is to a such thing as a E# and B#...you just havent gotten far enough in music theory yet

Are you actually serious? I put it up there because it was a ridiculous statement. If you read some of my posts, you'll see that I certainly have gotten to the point where I know they exist. There's no reason to say something like that, you're entirely wrong.
#5
Quote by :-D
It's really just a chromatic scale with two notes missing, but it's interesting if you apply it well.


Yeah, but would it be called simply 'chromatic', or 'decatonic?'

And I'm fairly sure it's major because of the lack of a m3...

There's a U, m2, and I guess a -3, but... does that even matter considering the high number of notes in the scale?
#6
You could call it either one, probably (chromatic or decatonic) - I wouldn't call it major, because major/minor tonality refers to a diatonic scale. There's a 3 but also a b6 and b7 from the minor scale so there's no distinct tonality.
#7
Oh, so great! I was half-hoping to get an atonal scale which wasn't fully chromatic. Do non Diatonic/heptatonic scales have scale degrees, or no because of a wont for exactly 7 notes?
#8
I wouldn't even really call that a scale unless you established some sort of relationship between the notes, which would be near impossible since there's no way you could build a stable harmony with it.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Apr 11, 2008,
#9
Quote by Chaosinferno825
Oh, so great! I was half-hoping to get an atonal scale which wasn't fully chromatic. Do non Diatonic/heptatonic scales have scale degrees, or no because of a wont for exactly 7 notes?

Everything can be expressed in terms of scale degrees - I'd hesitate to call it atonal though, truly atonal music is very hard to come by.
#10
I can think of a few triads, the tonic is able to be both major and augmented if I'm seeing it correctly, and the second note can be both minor and major. Third note is only a diminished triad, the fourth is diminished and minor, the fifth looks to be diminished and minor, sixth is major and augmented, seventh is strictly minor, the eigth is strictly minor, ninth is diminished and minor, while the tenth can be diminished and minor as well.

And sorry for the block of text, but is that about right? Still fairly new to theory, but I'm loving it. I actually made that scale to contain an augmented second, augmented fourth and augmented sixth, as well as make it contain more than eight notes.
#11
Quote by Chaosinferno825
I can think of a few triads, the tonic is able to be both major and augmented if I'm seeing it correctly

I didn't read the rest, but this is incorrect. An augmented triad is built 1 3 #5; you don't have a #5 in your scale.

EDIT: Nope, there is a #5, my mistake- you just didn't list it in the scale degrees. You have a b6 instead of #5 (Ab instead of G#), but there's no Ab in your example.
#13
Quote by bigtimber112
How would you go about naming this "scale" (if that's what you want to call it)?

I'd likely be inclined to go with Archeo's explanation, seeing as there's no context for this example "scale".
#14
Quote by :-D
I'd likely be inclined to go with Archeo's explanation, seeing as there's no context for this example "scale".



Ok then.