#1
I've recently learned about chord inversions and I understand them pretty well but I have just one question. How do you know which inversions to use when writing songs? Is it just through trial and error or what?
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#3
i see, well in the theory book i've been learning from i've yet to get to the section on voice leading, so maybe after understanding that I could answer my question?
<Raven> I got so baked last night
<Raven> that I WOKE UP high o_o
<Raven> Do you have any idea how euphoric that is?
<Raven> I felt like I was being born.
#4
It's just about the motion of each note of the chord, if you're playing F major to C majorfor example, it sounds more resolved to go to a C E G triad as opposed to a 1st inversion triad (E G C).
#5
Quote by C.C. Deville
i see, well in the theory book i've been learning from i've yet to get to the section on voice leading, so maybe after understanding that I could answer my question?
What kind of things are you trying to learn? Because in classical music there are many standard rules(as well as good ideas) on what inversions are used when.

But for guitar, it's usually a matter of what sounds best. Voice leading still applies here like :-D said. There are again certain "rules" that were set in Jazz guitar simply from many years of players coming to figure out what usually works best. But obviously they are much much looser then classical disciplines.
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#6
Isnt Inversion nothing more than an excuse for " Couldnt think of anything to put here"?

Thats what I leanred about Inversion

My recommendation is do some transposition and find out where you can take it.
#7
Quote by WickedZero
Isnt Inversion nothing more than an excuse for " Couldnt think of anything to put here"?

Thats what I leanred about Inversion

My recommendation is do some transposition and find out where you can take it.
You see this? Don't pay attention to this.

I think of chords as the sum of its individual notes. When you change chords, you're creating different melodies within the harmony. When you use voice leading well (meaning, you're creating good melodies within your chords), it enriches the tune and can grab hold of the ear, giving the listener something new to focus on on each subsequent listen. A piece with chords that are badly voiced can be jarring and rough on the ear. This is all without stating the obvious: by learning as many chord voicings as possible, your knowledge of the fretboard increases tremendously.

A nice guideline to follow when you're creating your chord progressions is to try to switch between chords with as little movement (note-wise) as possible. For example, if I was making a change of E-D-A, to minimize the movement between chords I might use these voicings:

e--------------
B--9--7--5-----
G--9--7--6-----
D--9--7--7-----
A--7--9--7-----
E--------------
#8
Quote by titopuente
You see this? Don't pay attention to this.

I think of chords as the sum of its individual notes. When you change chords, you're creating different melodies within the harmony. When you use voice leading well (meaning, you're creating good melodies within your chords), it enriches the tune and can grab hold of the ear, giving the listener something new to focus on on each subsequent listen. A piece with chords that are badly voiced can be jarring and rough on the ear. This is all without stating the obvious: by learning as many chord voicings as possible, your knowledge of the fretboard increases tremendously.

A nice guideline to follow when you're creating your chord progressions is to try to switch between chords with as little movement (note-wise) as possible. For example, if I was making a change of E-D-A, to minimize the movement between chords I might use these voicings:

e--------------
B--9--7--5-----
G--9--7--6-----
D--9--7--7-----
A--7--9--7-----
E--------------


We talkin Inverted Melodies or Harmonies here?

I saw him say Chord Inversion which kinda meant to at least me an Inverted Melody.

For example: A rising major third the inverted melody has a falling major third.
Last edited by WickedZero at Apr 11, 2008,
#9
Quote by WickedZero
We talkin Inverted Melodies or Harmonies here?

I saw him say Chord Inversion which kinda meant to at least me an Inverted Melody.

For example: A rising major third the inverted melody has a falling major third.


No a CHORD inversion is where you put another chord tone in the bass.

And by the way, an inverted major third is a minor sixth
#10
Quote by Galvanise69
I have a question about chord inversions.

Do they have to be stricly

Root Position: 1 3 5 (7)
First Inversion: 3 5 (7) 1
Second Inversion: 5 (7) 1 3

Or can it just be;

Root position; is a chord with the tonic in the bass
First inversion; is a chord with the mediant in the bass
Second Inversion; is a chord with the dominant in the bass

What would you call a chord with a 7th in the bass?

Would you call a C maj7 chord arranged 1 5 3 7 3?

Is that still classed as root position?


Yes
#13
Just judging by the pattern, I would say they would call a 3rd inversion 7th chord a 6/4/2 chord
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#15
It's just the weird old-school way to notate inversions. I guess it makes sense, but yeah it would be a lot easier to just think of it as C/E or whichever.

Then again, it does reveal more about the structure of it, since a 2nd inversion has the fourth and sixth intervals.
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#16
Quote by seedmole
Just judging by the pattern, I would say they would call a 3rd inversion 7th chord a 6/4/2 chord


Correct. These are all the common inversions and chords in classical notation. A lot of the time, the numbers in brackets are left out, to abbreviate the figures:

Root position: 5/(3)
First inversion: 6/(3)
Second inversion: 6/4

Seventh chord, root position: 7/(5)/(3)
Seventh chord, first inversion: 6/5/(3)
Seventh chord, second inversion: (6)/4/3
Seventh chord, third inversion: (6)/4/2

Just so you know, Galvanise69, at least in classical music, the inversions are dependant upon the note in the bass, so the rest of the chord does not have to be a strict inversion, which helps a lot with voice leading some times.
#17
Quote by ouchies
Yes but I would just call it an CM/E and CM/G, well depending on context anyway.

6/4 sus2? I'm not too sure, I don't see the practically in knowing this anyway. Can't you figure it out?

edit: or even just a 6sus


If it was C/E, then it would be C major 6/(3) 9-8 (the 6/3 denotes second inversion, the 9-8 denotes sus2.) and if it was C/G it would be C major 6/4 9-8.
In classical notation, sus2 is written as 9-8, sus4 is written as 4-3 and sus7 is written as 7-6.

The reason this classical notation is used is just it was the convention about 300 years ago and it stuck. Continuo parts would be written as basslines, with the figures underneath to denote the chords. It wasn't designed to make it easier for the player, but to make it quicker for the composer to write music, which is probably why it's not used so much now.
#19
Quote by Galvanise69
I have a question about chord inversions.

Do they have to be stricly

Root Position: 1 3 5 (7)
First Inversion: 3 5 (7) 1
Second Inversion: 5 (7) 1 3
I dunno if people answered this so NO. Only the bass note defines the inversion.

Or can it just be;

Root position; is a chord with the tonic in the bass
First inversion; is a chord with the mediant in the bass
Second Inversion; is a chord with the dominant in the bass
I think you got slightly confused. You mean root, third, and fifth, not tonic, mediant, and dominant. You don't want to think that way unless you specifically want to think that each chord is based off of its own scale.. Much easier to think of them as diatonic to the key of the progression you're working with.

What would you call a chord with a 7th in the bass?
It's usually simply written as 4/2. Usually only dominant and leading tone chords are found in 4/2 in classical music.

As far as figured bass goes, I just wanted to add to what someone said before. A lot of old chorals were written simply with a bass line and figured bass. It was up to the pianist/organist to fill in the rest of the chords. Hence figuring out the chord from the bass notes(figured bass)
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#20
Quote by KryptNet


As far as figured bass goes, I just wanted to add to what someone said before. A lot of old chorals were written simply with a bass line and figured bass. It was up to the pianist/organist to fill in the rest of the chords. Hence figuring out the chord from the bass notes(figured bass)


That's what I said/meant