#1
Are there any good guitar exercise, theory, and method books you would suggest?

For method, I was considering A Modern Method for Guitar Volumes 1-3. The Hal Leonard Method also seems legitimate.

For exercise, I was considering the Guitar Grimoire.

For theory, I was considering Music Reading for Guitar and Music Theory for Guitarists.
#2
I highly recommend Creative Guitar 2: Advanced Techniques, depending on how good you are and how much theory you know.

A few Jazz books might be good for theory aswell.
#3
The MJS total scales, techniques and applications has really advanced my playing in the time that ive had the book, really helps with scale theory and 'shredding' techniques
#4
I have the Hal Leonard 1-3 method. It's been used for many decades and supposedly has been translated into many different languages or something like that. It's really a bunch of "folk" type songs. You will get a basic understanding of reading music and some tabs as well. Personally I think it's pretty basic and I would recommend it if you were just starting as a beginner (they teach you how to hold a guitar). That Berklee book is mainly all sight reading, might be boring if you aren't in to that...

Maybe try some Troy Setnia books
86% of the people who frequent the "Electric Guitar" forum would say that they have played guitar for under 5 years.
#5
Quote by AznElliot518
I have the Hal Leonard 1-3 method. It's been used for many decades and supposedly has been translated into many different languages or something like that. It's really a bunch of "folk" type songs. You will get a basic understanding of reading music and some tabs as well. Personally I think it's pretty basic and I would recommend it if you were just starting as a beginner (they teach you how to hold a guitar). That Berklee book is mainly all sight reading, might be boring if you aren't in to that...

Maybe try some Troy Setnia books

I guess I'll have to actually flip through these to see which is best for me... sight reading would be boring, but I think it's a good skill that I should definitely master.

Quote by Towner_45
The MJS total scales, techniques and applications has really advanced my playing in the time that ive had the book, really helps with scale theory and 'shredding' techniques

I'll look that up.

Quote by BGSM
I highly recommend Creative Guitar 2: Advanced Techniques, depending on how good you are and how much theory you know.

A few Jazz books might be good for theory aswell.


I'm just beginning, and I'm not too into jazz... would it be good to go into that anyway?
#6
I really like working through both the Hal Leonard 1-2-3 book and the Guitar for Dummies one. They compliment each other nicely. For exercises I'm working through Speed Mechanics.
#7
I see... I've always had this feeling that people looked down on the Dummy's/Idiot's guides.
#8
I also have Total Scales Techniques and Applications by MJS, it's filled with exercises for alternate picking, legato, tapping, bending, vibrato, double note patterns and advanced applications that include string skipping and so called "maniac patterns" where I think I've seen some sweep arpeggios, but it doesn't directly address sweep picking or economy picking. Perhaps most importantly, it has every note in every major/minor key plotted out in tab and standard notation. It's worth getting, I wish I would've had it the first day I started (got it for X-mas and I've been playing since July of last year). Having that and a metronome has really improved my alternate picking.

Yeah, so I'd recommend it.
Originally Posted by SkyValley
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#9
Alright, so for exercises I think the MJS fills in... what about just a general lesson book?
#10
Quote by G.9
I see... I've always had this feeling that people looked down on the Dummy's/Idiot's guides.


Interesting, around UG the "For Dummies" book is held in high regard, but not everyone likes the Hal Leonard books. I like them both, but they both take a different approach. The For Dummies books doesn't want anything to do with teaching you how to read music, it concerns itself with teaching you TAB and advanced articulation. Despite it's name, it gets you playing advance music faster. It's weakness is that it doesn't really go into depth on the different subjects but shows you 100's of different techniques. The Hal Leonard series basically teaches you to understand music and uses the guitar as it's instrument of choice to learn it with. It's a lot more rigid, takes a more classic approach, but it builds a solid foundation for learning guitar.
#11
Quote by rhettro
I really like working through both the Hal Leonard 1-2-3 book and the Guitar for Dummies one. They compliment each other nicely. For exercises I'm working through Speed Mechanics.


yeah same for me minus the hal leonard one.

the speed mechanics really has been awesome to me. playing the exercises with the metronome really helps me see improvement..........and they are tough yet fun to play. and i still have like 100 exercises to go so i know theres A LOT left to learn

the guitar for dummies one is good for beginners, but i dont see much use for it at this point(and i havent been playing that long, probably just since my join date here) except when i forget some chords. ive gone through almost all the chapters (skipped the classical guitar section...im not ready to put my pick down yet ) and im up to the jazz one atm. the songs that you play along with throughout are pretty crappy though, i just practice the techniques.
#12
Yeah, that's the second time I've heard about Speed Mechanics and I was thinking of getting that later on...

...do you think it'd be good to get both Hal Leonard (don't forget about the Berklee one) and Dummy's, or would the exercises just be really repetitive? Does the Hal Leonard go over all the techniques that Dummy's does? Does it just take longer to get there?
#13
I use Mel Bay Modern Guitar Method. Right now I am on Book 1, but there are a lot more volumes.
Saint Louis Blues
#14
yeah -- if you're interested in exercise music.....for gym music or music for fitness in general, I recommend European dance music.......

it's always the best motivational tool for me...

.... here's a compilation series on iTunes that I recommend -- the "Euro Club Hits" series:

http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZSearch.woa/wa/advancedSearchResults?albumTerm=Euro+Club+Hits+Vol+
#15
Quote by G.9
...do you think it'd be good to get both Hal Leonard (don't forget about the Berklee one) and Dummy's, or would the exercises just be really repetitive?


Well yes and no. They are both beginer books so they do cover simular ground, but the approaches are different.

Quote by G.9

Does the Hal Leonard go over all the techniques that Dummy's does? ?


No. There is more technique in the Dummy's book. In my opinion, the Dummy's book gets you up and playing more interesting music faster the flip side being that it's more for the casual player without the depth of the Leonard books.

Quote by G.9

Does it just take longer to get there?


If you work through more than one book at a time yes it takes longer. If all you want to do is download tabs from UG, then the Dummies book is all you need. Otherwise, if you want to improvise and write your own songs, the Leonard series give you more a more music focused education.

So here is my advice, if you already know how to read music, get the Dummy's book. If you have zero music knowledge, get the Leonard series. If you're a completist (like me) get both.
#16
I like the Musicians Institutes series of book, I've found them very helpful in everything so far
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#17
That Berklee book is mainly all sight reading, might be boring if you aren't in to that...


I have to disagree, the "Modern Method for Guitar" book one alone has a huge variety of exercises and technique building lessons. The solos pieces and chord solos will be very challenging unless you've played a ton of jazz stuff before.

But...you do have to learn to be a reader.

If you aren't working with a teacher, get the book and DVD package, every single lesson and exercise is explained.

This is not a "Rock God" book but it will give you a foundation that few guitarists today have.
#18
Quote by stringzzz
I have to disagree, the "Modern Method for Guitar" book one alone has a huge variety of exercises and technique building lessons. The solos pieces and chord solos will be very challenging unless you've played a ton of jazz stuff before.

But...you do have to learn to be a reader.

If you aren't working with a teacher, get the book and DVD package, every single lesson and exercise is explained.

This is not a "Rock God" book but it will give you a foundation that few guitarists today have.

Would getting Modern Method for Guitar outdo Hal Leonard and Dummy's? It seems much longer in page length...

Quote by rhettro
So here is my advice, if you already know how to read music, get the Dummy's book. If you have zero music knowledge, get the Leonard series. If you're a completist (like me) get both.

Well, I'm a pianist and I know how to sight read... I'd like to learn how to sight read with the guitar as well, but is it a relatively similar process?
#21
Quote by G.9
Well, I'm a pianist and I know how to sight read... I'd like to learn how to sight read with the guitar as well, but is it a relatively similar process?


Not really, because some notes can be played in multiple positions on the fret board.
#22
Quote by rhettro
Not really, because some notes can be played in multiple positions on the fret board.

Yeah, that's what I was thinking...

...right now I'm tilting towards getting just the Berklee Music title for the method book. I'm pretty sure that encompasses any concepts found in Hal Leonard and Dummy's. Still open to exercise suggestions.
#23
The cherry lane one has lots and lots of exercises then teaches you a whole lot of scales and other things, then at the end has a few very technical fun to play and learn songs
#24
i reccomend mel bay's book, if youre quite the beginner its good for learning, but i still do several of the scales in the back, they're amazing exercises, and is like $8, hard to go wrong there.
#25
Quote by wuffwuffwuffy
The cherry lane one has lots and lots of exercises then teaches you a whole lot of scales and other things, then at the end has a few very technical fun to play and learn songs

Anyone second this?

I don't think the Dummy's or Hal Leonard will suffice... I've got Mel Bay's and Berklee's in my radar at the moment. Mel Bay's also has a whole set of accompanying practice books and exercises as well.
#26
Would getting Modern Method for Guitar outdo Hal Leonard and Dummy's? It seems much longer in page length...


from what I've seen most Hal Lenard , Mel Bay book 1&2 stuff seems to be based alot on the Berklee book. just less intensive.

The dummies book would still be good for quick reference stuff like, "what is an inversion" and things like that.

The MI books look good and tend to be more specialized, although they seem to have a book for just about every topic. I would check the MI website.
#27
MI would be...?

Also, if I get Berklee, would I still want to get a separate theory book, like this?
Last edited by G.9 at Apr 15, 2008,