#1
Is it true that one just needs to learn the patterns and then you can apply it anywhere on the guitar?

Like I ran across this picture of the minor pentatonic scale and it shows just 5 patterns. So I just need to memorize these 5 patterns and then I can apply it anywhere on the guitar?

http://worshipguitarguy.files.wordpress.com/2007/01/pentatonic-positions-full.gif

Does that go with major scales too?
#2
If you mean you can shift the pattern corresponding to the root note of the scale, then yes, you can play them "anywhere on the guitar"

Beware that it can limit your creative potential when you learn the scales as positions and not as notes.

EDIT: of course most people learn them as positions(including me), but it can limit your soloing in the long rung(as it did to me).
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
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#3
What do you mean limit? Aren't you learning the notes when learn the patterns too?
#4
Well...

Its not just 5 positions entirely as the theory basically says you can run the neck with a pentatonic and remain in the same key.

So finding all locations of the whole scale is important.

If you know you are in A Major and all positions down the neck how about A#? And would you know the places where you can bring that A Major to a E Minor?

Thats the trick I think.

Finding spots where it is safe to transition in the scales.
Last edited by WickedZero at Apr 11, 2008,
#5
Quote by DominoK
What do you mean limit? Aren't you learning the notes when learn the patterns too?
Well that's what I was getting at. If your learn the actual notes and learn the steps/intervals that make up the scale you are really doing yourself a favor. If you learn the different scales through simple muscle memory, you're at a disadvantage. But if you're learning that patterns AND learning the notes and their relationships, you're off to a fantastic start!
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#6
Quote by KryptNet
if you're learning that patterns AND learning the notes and their relationships, you're off to a fantastic start!



totally agreed you should learn the patterns and how to make the scale.


if you ever have any questions people here are pretty good althought some forget what it was like to just start learning.

but for the most part they are very helpful
song stuck in my head today


#7
Quote by KryptNet
If you mean you can shift the pattern corresponding to the root note of the scale, then yes, you can play them "anywhere on the guitar"

Beware that it can limit your creative potential when you learn the scales as positions and not as notes.

EDIT: of course most people learn them as positions(including me), but it can limit your soloing in the long rung(as it did to me).



I totally agree that learning the notes is a good thing.

I disagree that learning the patterns / positions can limit you in any way.
If anything they give you a visual reference that is helpful when you do learn how to construct scales.

There is no reason to discourage the learning of patterns on the guitar.


the TS did ask about applying the scales though, and thats where the knowledge of the notes and theory are necessary. it should be possible to get that point across without putting any negative connotation on the idea of learning the patterns.

Quote by DominoK
. So I just need to memorize these 5 patterns and then I can apply it anywhere on the guitar?

Does that go with major scales too?


learning the patterns will allow you to know the patterns. but learning to apply them, involves knowledge of the notes on the neck, and some theory knowledge. ( scale construction, diatonic harmony).
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 11, 2008,
#8
Quote by GuitarMunky

the TS did ask about applying the scales though, and thats where the knowledge of the notes and theory are necessary. it should be possible to get that point across without putting any negative connotation on the idea of learning the patterns.
If you re-read my post it's quite obvious that I was talking from a perspective of personal experience. And I never said that learning patterns was bad.

My point to the TS is if you are at the stage of learning the patterns, a little extra effort could take you a very long way.

Don't turn this into another "learn your theory n00b!" debate. Cause it's not even close. Nor was my advice patronizing in any way.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination