#1
Here is a question for meant for each of you personally...

When you start writing a chord progression how do you choice what chord goes next?

Assuming your first chord is the tonic chord how do you decide what chord will come second and then third and so on?
#2
Quote by mr. cool
Here is a question for meant for each of you personally...

When you start writing a chord progression how do you choice what chord goes next?

Assuming your first chord is the tonic chord how do you decide what chord will come second and then third and so on?



i play until i find something i like

i don't think of any tonic and all that crap i just play.
song stuck in my head today


#3
i usually write the riff first, then i try to make the chords complement it. but if im writing like a chorus or something, i just try to make it sound good. i also try not to use really recognizable progressions, but if i do, i try to make it more interesting.
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


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#5
Well when you have your first chord that you like you then choose another chord that you like and so on. There arn't any boundaries but to give you a few ideas of commonly used chord progressions for different styles of music just hava a browse on the web and then strum them out on your guitar and get a feel for the different sounds.
I will shred in the end!!
#6
I usually decide by mood and usually try to end it with the perfect cadence... (if youre trying to get advice on chord leading id check a music theory book, they usually have sweet little charts)
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#7
Once you start with a chord, your second chord can only do one of three things...it can go up, it can go down, or it can stay the same. Same with the next chord. This way you BUILD a progression. You are led to the next chord by the previous ones. Only YOU can decide what is RIGHT and NO ONE else can tell you you are wrong, but no one has to listen either.
#9
Assuming the first chord is the tonic, you can use a number of chords in the same key to continue the progression. Take the key of C Major, for example, the tonic chord is C. From that you can go to Dm, Em, F, G, Am, Bm7b5. You can use any of those chords and it is almost guaranteed to sound good as it is in the same key. Once you have gotten used to those, you can then start to look for out of key chords to use, which are usually taken from the parallel minor, in this case Cm, for example Fm, Eb, Bb etc.