#1
Hey!

Yeah, right there. I think that's my problem. Like most people in the world I listen to music, and what I hear is a pain, a cry exerted from the guitar that is just heavenly on some of the songs I have. I want to know how to do that.

I think the problem lies within me. I have much positive energy(Not that it's bad, we don't need a lot of pricks in this world), and I play blues and pentatonic licks and improvisations, but I want to switch from that to the anguish(and back again, I want to still appreciate life) to make my playing have a deeper weight.

Yes, that sound is an emotion, but I haven't fully grasped what to do or how to do that, but most importantly, I clearly don't know HOW it's done.

So basically, my questions are these:

1- What should I listen to to understand it more in depth
2- How can I play that crying sound
3- What should I already know so I can play it

If you're confused about what I'm asking, then I'm probably not saying it right...
#5
Quote by SilverDark
Hey!

Yeah, right there. I think that's my problem. Like most people in the world I listen to music, and what I hear is a pain, a cry exerted from the guitar that is just heavenly on some of the songs I have. I want to know how to do that.

I think the problem lies within me. I have much positive energy(Not that it's bad, we don't need a lot of pricks in this world), and I play blues and pentatonic licks and improvisations, but I want to switch from that to the anguish(and back again, I want to still appreciate life) to make my playing have a deeper weight.

Yes, that sound is an emotion, but I haven't fully grasped what to do or how to do that, but most importantly, I clearly don't know HOW it's done.

So basically, my questions are these:

1- What should I listen to to understand it more in depth
2- How can I play that crying sound
3- What should I already know so I can play it

If you're confused about what I'm asking, then I'm probably not saying it right...

It's a combination of many things. Interesting riffs, slick lyric writing, drums, bass, etc., etc. Every artist/band has different ways of expressing their pain an anguish. Elliott Smith and Blind Melon were both really good at putting depressing lyrics underneath happy-sounding music. That, to me, is always really powerful. Listen to Baby Britain by Elliott Smith and, um... let's see... Walk by Blind Melon.
Banging on a trash can
Drumming on a street light
#6
bigfatsandwich pretty much nailed it. Basically, the rhythm has to set up a good song for the guitar. Slow songs have always been really powerful to me, so I made one. It's on my page if you want to check it out. I just read this thread and it was exactly how I felt when I wrote "Blood in the Wind".
#7
Having natural talent helps intensely. It really lets you have that phrasing just sort of "come" to you. Otherwise, do what bigfatsandwich said.