#2
Good ol' fashioned E minor

but you've gotta listen to the records and check the tabs and see what makes a Metallica bassline distinct from other bands.
#3
I love it how people ask for scales for solos, metal, funk, jazz, rock, classicrock, cliff burton, jaco pastorius, etc etc as if magically playing those scales will make them sound like that. Yeah scales are important, but the choice of notes and the phrasing are more important IMO.
#4
Quote by watchingmefall
I love it how people ask for scales for solos, metal, funk, jazz, rock, classicrock, cliff burton, jaco pastorius, etc etc as if magically playing those scales will make them sound like that. Yeah scales are important, but the choice of notes and the phrasing are more important IMO.


I also think that everyone tends to go at this backwards, they find a song and begin the search of what particular scale, and shortcut really understanding music theory. Its like trying to write a book like Tolstoi, by searching through a Russian dictionary for the right bits.

Learning scales is learning the building blocks of music. The also help build muscle memory so that your ability to maneuver within a certain scale in a certain key becomes second nature. They also train your ear to hear intervals.

Boring? Maybe to some. But if you get your basic scales down, being able to figure out bass lines on the fly and play your own wonderful sound improvised lines becomes a snap.
#5
I dont want to sound exactly like him I just wanted to examine how he used the scale
#6
You don't need to examine how someone used a scale. It's pretty much useless to do that. It'd just be "well, he tended to use an F# after playing an E..." etc ad nauseum. Examining his playing style is something you can do that can transcend scales, and be useful in any situation.
#7
who?
Quote by breakdown123
Is there such a thing as a heavy riff with out chugging on the e string?
#8
Quote by watchingmefall
I love it how people ask for scales for solos, metal, funk, jazz, rock, classicrock, cliff burton, jaco pastorius, etc etc as if magically playing those scales will make them sound like that. Yeah scales are important, but the choice of notes and the phrasing are more important IMO.

thats exactly what i thought as i was reading the post..
#9
Quote by MV4824
I agree, but I do think everyone assumes that when starting out. Music is freedom, you can write a masterpiece by not following any theory or structural forms.... But I write my music correctly making use of scales and phrasing


Thats how guys like Mick Karn do their thing. I read an interview in BP where he explained how he knows no theory, and doesnt even know where the notes are on the neck. But when you listen to him he sounds awesome. I wish I could do that...
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