#1
my friend and I are jamming tonight, and we want to start coming up with our own music. i know how to figure out minor scales and such, but i don't understand how to tell what scales to play over a chord progression. if anyone could tell me a chord progression in A minor, i would be very greatful.
#2
Quote by hippiecrack69
my friend and I are jamming tonight, and we want to start coming up with our own music. i know how to figure out minor scales and such, but i don't understand how to tell what scales to play over a chord progression. if anyone could tell me a chord progression in A minor, i would be very greatful.



well the chords in Am (natural minor) are:

Am, Bdim, C, Dm, Em, F , G

you can experiment with those ..... keep in mind Am should be the "tonal center".

typical Am progressions:

Am - G - F - G

Am - F - C - G

Am - C - G - F G

get creative and see what you can come up with.
shred is gaudy music
#4
In addition to what GuitarMunky gave you, the v is sharpened many times in a minor key, becoming V (E major in this case). It gives you the ability to use the harmonic minor scale (A B C D E F G#) and still leads nicely back to an A minor chord. It'll spice the progression up a little.
Last edited by :-D at Apr 12, 2008,
#5
so if i was to play something such as Am-F-C-G , i would solo with an a minor scale? does it matter if the scale is harmonic or melodic?
#6
Quote by hippiecrack69
so if i was to play something such as Am-F-C-G , i would solo with an a minor scale? does it matter if the scale is harmonic or melodic?

You'd use A natural minor with that.
#7
Quote by hippiecrack69
so if i was to play something such as Am-F-C-G , i would solo with an a minor scale? does it matter if the scale is harmonic or melodic?



if your just learning to solo, and havent spent much time with theory.... I would suggest avoiding complications that you arent yet ready to understand. harmonic minor works in a particular situation that probably wont make sense to you yet. I wouldnt worry about it at this point.


the thing with the V chord having a major 3rd (from harmonic minor) was common in classical music. The concept is likely over your head right now.

I would suggest that you stick with natural minor for a while, until you get that under your fingers and in your ears.

If you want to try other scales, you could also play the minor pentatonic, or minor blues. those are all interchangeable with natural minor.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 12, 2008,
#8
Quote by GuitarMunky
the thing with the V chord having a major 3rd (from harmonic minor) was common in classical music. The concept is likely over your head right now.

Since it leads back to the tonic chord well, I think he'll be able to use it without much of a problem.
#9
Quote by :-D
Since it leads back to the tonic chord well, I think he'll be able to use it without much of a problem.


he will have to know when he can and cant use it, which makes it more complicated.

I would suggest keeping it simple for starters.
shred is gaudy music
#11
Quote by GuitarMunky
he will have to know when he can and cant use it, which makes it more complicated.

I would suggest keeping it simple for starters.

If he has a progression it's in, there's no reason not to use it.

TS, try this: A minor, G major, F major, E major back to A minor.
#12
Quote by :-D
If he has a progression it's in, there's no reason not to use it.

TS, try this: A minor, G major, F major, E major back to A minor.

that sounds cool, a minor natural goes with it right?
#14
Quote by :-D
If he has a progression it's in, there's no reason not to use it.

TS, try this: A minor, G major, F major, E major back to A minor.



to the TS...

what he says is true, if you understand where to play that harmonic minor, you can use it.

Out of curiosity..... do you understand where to play the harmonic minor.... and do you know why you would use harmonic minor over that chord.
also do you want to deal with having to change your scale every few measures ?

if so go for it. If not, those are some good reasons why to keep it simple for now.

Anyway, it seems as if were in the usual UG battle over which advice is better.

for my part, I would always advise working on things that are appropriate for your current skill and knowledge. There is alot of things you could try. But if the concepts are over your head its not really going to do you any good. Anyway thats my take on it.

good luck with your jam! hope you have fun!
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 12, 2008,
#16
Quote by :-D
Nope, don't worry - I'm not saying my way is better, just that such a progression will keep things interesting.


sure it will. You could take that further as well. Why not make the V chord an altered dominant. Than he could play the whole tone scale, or the diminished scale. You could make it as complicated as you want. the question is ....... is he ready to do that.... will he understand how why and when to do that.

anyway TS, most of the advice you get here will be mixed in with alot of arguments and disagreements. I hope your still able to get something from it.
shred is gaudy music
#17
Quote by GuitarMunky
if your just learning to solo, and havent spent much time with theory.... I would suggest avoiding complications that you arent yet ready to understand. harmonic minor works in a particular situation that probably wont make sense to you yet. I wouldnt worry about it at this point.
Agreed. But you can still experiment with putting in a little harmonic minor thing in your improv. have your friend play a little vamp/progression like Am and F and use natural and harmonic minor. You don't have to understand why it works(or doesn't). It just might wet your appetite that's all.

Also try like Am7 to D7. And remember to rip into some mean Amin pentatonics too! Have fun.
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#18
Dammit I've been waiting for a thread like this.. my fave key to jam in is Am. but seeing as hte question has been more or less answered. I would say play in 12 bar blues in A minor first a few times, as many that are necessary to "master it" and get a few nice licks and stock phrases, this might take maybe even a few jams. You're primarily using the A minor scale for most of it, but when you switch to D minor, you have to only worry about the Bflat, and the E7, if you're not familliar with it, just maybe run an arpeggio up and down, ending on the leading note (G#) and boom you're back at the A tonic. If you've never jammed it might take you a while to get some nice stuff going, but keep at it and keep experimenting.

Then take a more complicated progression one with more chords which switch faster. A good one that I use:

Am | Dm | G | C | F | E7 Am |

| is a bar.

anyways this is just what I did when i started jamming, hope it helps. the most important thing, is to keep it interesting and switch WITH the chords. So.. A,C,E might fit in the D minor scale, but its more interesting IMO if you actually stay with the notes of the chord and the scale respectively.
Last edited by one vision at Apr 12, 2008,