#1
i have never really been a fan of how flying v's look. but it seems over time they have sometimes been associated with a good number of shredders. my basic question is whether or not the v-style and weight have any positive influence on playability, both in terms of manuvering around the fretboard as well as pick hand control and speed.
:flame disclaimer:: i realize that those skills improve with practice, not with your style of guitar:
i have been playing for over 10 years, but just have never considered the notion or had the chance to play a v to see for myself. i am also wondering what effect the body style has on tone.

any thoughts/advice would be much appreciated.
#2
the effect on tone is that it is a little more trebly, due to the lack of wood around the top (neck area)

they obviously suck to sit down and play, but the other day I tried my friend's Kerry King V - I would LOVE to own a V for playing live or practicing. Playing it while standing was nice, it seemed to balance perfectly
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#3
I have a V and an LP style guitar. I think the two main advantages of a V are that they are lightweight and that they are louder if you are playing unplugged (even though you might as well just get an acoustic).
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#4
I really disagree with all the people who say Vs are uncomfortable to play sitting down. I bought myself a Jackson King V a few years ago. Slap a 90-degree jack patch cord into it, position the wings above and below your knee and you're good to go...you'll be used to it within a few days, and its much more similiar to the way the guitar would be positioned when standing than the "traditional" sittingg down style.
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#5
Ive played a Gibson Faded V. It sounds really nice. Great distorted sound. The higher frets seem to be a little more comfortable and easy to get to, altho the same can be said for RGs, Strats, etc. I think iits mostly the modern, radical, "metal" look of it that shredders and metal players like. And imo, '67-style Gibson Vs are just plain awesome.
#6
There's not much to it besides perfect upper-fret access and no playability sitting down.

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#7
Quote by phatsack
the effect on tone is that it is a little more trebly, due to the lack of wood around the top (neck area)

they obviously suck to sit down and play, but the other day I tried my friend's Kerry King V - I would LOVE to own a V for playing live or practicing. Playing it while standing was nice, it seemed to balance perfectly


i actually think they are more are nice to play sitting down. I prefer to rest my guitar on the opposite leg, the right leg in my case (im a lefty) and a V fits nicely becuase you put the upper horn over the left leg

also they have infinitely better access to the upper frets, and are light weight usually (i actually like heavier guitars)
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#8
I personally found the Gibson Flying V very uncomfortable to play sitting down, but like dbzrage3k said, it probably takes a bit of getting used to. The guitar sounded brilliant and played very nicely though.
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#11
They look badass.

That's the only significant difference I find between my SV and my RG/Avenger. It is brighter, but it's alder as opposed to mahogany, so I can't blame that on the shape.
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#12
There really aren't any "cons" about them. It's just personal preference. They aren't hard at all to sit down with, despite what many may think. It's just different, and IMO once you get used to it, they are actually more comfortable to sit with. And when standing... it's like heaven. The only con I can think of is most of them don't have very good upper fret access compared to, say, a superstrat, but it's not terrible. I can reach the 24th fret on the RR24 pretty easily.
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#13
You're saying, you've been playing for 10 years and never played a V?

Gibson V's are just pwnful, although the RR one's are nice too.
#15
Quote by OThugSd
I have a V and an LP style guitar. I think the two main advantages of a V are that they are lightweight and that they are louder if you are playing unplugged (even though you might as well just get an acoustic).


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