#1
Hi everyone.

I'm thinking of buying a bass (as the one i am playing right now, is a borrowed one), but since i got pretty small fingers (and yes, i am fully grown) i find i difficult to play on a "real" bass, i am considering a shortscale bass.
Is there a major difference betweene a normal and a shortscale? Other than the length of the neck.
#2
The difference between a shortscale and a standard scale is in the length of the neck. To me they just don't feel right. To you they may be perfect. Personally I don't think that they're necessary. For the most part, playing with proper technique will eliminate any kind of hand size problem.
#3
I believe that on the shortscale necks you don't get quite as much sustain as the normal scale. Its not that much of a difference. If you feel more comfortable with the shortscale go with that. May I recommend the Fender Mustang, excellent short scale bass.
Gear:
EBMM Bongo HS 4
EBMM Sting Ray 5
Eden D410T
Tech 21 Sansamp RBI
Tech 21 Sansamp RPM
Art 341 Dual Channel EQ
QSC GX5 Power Amp
#4
strings will be more loose, and even more if you decide to down tune. Try an Ibanez, they have pretty slim necks, and the bodys are small, but still standard scale.
Quote by breakdown123
Is there such a thing as a heavy riff with out chugging on the e string?
#6
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
The difference between a shortscale and a standard scale is in the length of the neck. To me they just don't feel right. To you they may be perfect. Personally I don't think that they're necessary. For the most part, playing with proper technique will eliminate any kind of hand size problem.



Agreed 100%. I can do it. So can you. I have very small hands and I can even manage a long scale just fine now. Yes, it takes good technique and playing scales until you're numb. But guess what! Yesterday I managed a 5 fret spread with no problems.

Buy a short scale if you like the sound--don't buy it as a handicap bass for a handicap you really don't have, and can get around with some concerted practice and good technique.
#7
I consider buying one for comfort, I can't seem to get my fingers right while standing up. While sitting down I can play for hours, but standing up I can manage about 30-40 minutes, tops, before my left hand starts to hurt.

Would you recommend this?
Fler Ismaskiner!
#8
Eklund, that sounds like you have a technique issue. Where's your elbow on your fretting hand. If its close to your body that's part of the issue. That works for a guitar player but not a bassist.

Also, if you have smaller hands, wearing your bass higher on your body with your neck angled up will help alot. It may not look cool to you, but it does help with the fatigue and fret access.
#9
Actually, the problem is that i do all of that. Or rather, I do what you recommend me to do.
Fler Ismaskiner!
#10
I have average hands and play an exteneded neck. I've played shortscale and personally wanted to burn it before finishing a song. Its floppy, has no sustain, and when playing higher on the neck, it gets really cramped. I agree with everyone else who says you can fix your problems with technique.
#11
Quote by Eklund
Actually, the problem is that i do all of that. Or rather, I do what you recommend me to do.


How thick is your strap? It almost sounds like you are supporting your neck with your hand as well as fretting it
#12
Hm, that was a good one. Never thought of that actually.

After testing, i found that there is a small neck dive. It stops when close to horizontal, and i prefer to have it angled i bit upwards. My strap is 5 cm broad, and 1 cm thick. Really comfy, and fits very well with my bass, aesthetically. (attack of the relevant info!)

The problem might very well be that the weight puts too much strain on my hand, but the more i think about it - I didn't have that problem during my 9 years of playing french horn.
Fler Ismaskiner!
#13
I have smaller hands and play long scale. I prefer it for any bass with the low-B - I find I get more tone and less 'farting' and can tune down and still get a clear pitch.
The wider stretching was not noticeable compared to the extra string tension.