#1
http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php

I dont understand what the things on the page mean. I get the names of the scales on the very right. But what do patter and chords mean. And when i press "get" How do i play what it shows for example 1 b2 3 4 5. I dont understand what the B means and what the numbers are telling me.

Thanks
#3
ya i read that but i still dont understand. I get that there intervals but how do i know what number goes to which string. Can someone explain it in the simplist way possible with an example. like 1 2b 3 4b 5 =... then saying what notes to play.

thanks
#4
Quote by bWsWwrestler
ya i read that but i still dont understand. I get that there intervals but how do i know what number goes to which string. Can someone explain it in the simplist way possible with an example. like 1 2b 3 4b 5 =... then saying what notes to play.

thanks


The numbers don't "go to strings", they refer to scale degrees. You really need to read the sticky and familiarize yourself with the major scale before worrying about anything else.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
Ye. If you want an explanation, the link I posted to the sticky is where to start. You literally need to start at the very basics of theory as you don't even know what the "b" in "b2" stands for.
Proud Owner of:

Jackson RR3
Jackson WRMG

Quote by madbasslover
What's the big deal with Gibsons, anyway?
I've heard loads of Gibsons being played before
and they don't sound any more special than
any other guitar.

^UG's King Of Fail.
Last edited by Eternal_One at Apr 13, 2008,
#6
No i just started learning theory and i have been studying major scales. And now i get the b things but i still dont know about scale degrees. can somebody just answer me without making it so difficult
#7
Quote by bWsWwrestler
No i just started learning theory and i have been studying major scales. And now i get the b things but i still dont know about scale degrees. can somebody just answer me without making it so difficult

You should read the sticky; this post will be a generic outline but still a favor.

Each note in the scale corresponds to a scale degree, and people refer to these degrees as they relate to the major scale. A major scale is constructed with degrees 1 2 3 4 5 6 7. In C major, you'd have this:

C D E F G A B
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

When you see "b" it means that the interval is brought down a half step, "#" means raised a half step. For example, the natural minor scale is spelled out as 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7. Compare this with a visual for C major and C minor:

C major: C D E F G A B

In C minor, you have Eb, Ab and Bb; these are the third, sixth and seventh degrees so you notate it as such.

C D Eb F G Ab Bb
1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7

The three notes are flattened relative to the major scale with the same root (parallel major). Does that help at all?
#10
just a little on the scale degrees. I dont see how you know what notes to play on each string.
#11
Quote by bWsWwrestler
just a little on the scale degrees. I dont see how you know what notes to play on each string.

Do you know the notes of the fretboard well? If you don't, learn them and it'll become much more apparent.
#12
Quote by bWsWwrestler
just a little on the scale degrees. I dont see how you know what notes to play on each string.



each fret is a note so if you know the standard tuning and tune your guitar to it you will know what the open note is and can count down from there

i know that sounds tedious but that is one way

so if the major scale of C is

CDEFGABC
1234567

we would only play these notes on on any given string at any point to stay in Cmaj
song stuck in my head today


#14
ya i know all the notes on the fretboard. I still dont really understand though. Because some scales have different notes on different strings in a scale so i dont get it. And if you play those notes on every string it wouldnt sound like a scale
#15
Quote by bWsWwrestler
ya i know all the notes on the fretboard. I still dont really understand though. Because some scales have different notes on different strings in a scale so i dont get it. And if you play those notes on every string it wouldnt sound like a scale

I'm not sure what you're saying, could you explain that a little better? If you know all your notes you should have no problem constructing the scales on the fretboard.
#16
Quote by bWsWwrestler
ya i know all the notes on the fretboard. I still dont really understand though. Because some scales have different notes on different strings in a scale so i dont get it. And if you play those notes on every string it wouldnt sound like a scale


Scales are collections of notes. Take those notes and play them anywhere on the fretboard, in any order.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#17
Quote by bWsWwrestler
ya i know all the notes on the fretboard. I still dont really understand though. Because some scales have different notes on different strings in a scale so i dont get it. And if you play those notes on every string it wouldnt sound like a scale



yeah i'm not getting you point either

most of the time you can't define a scale unless you have a progression to it. is that what you mean??

like if i just play the scale CDEFGABC how would i know it is Cmaj and not Amin or somehing to that effect?

is that what your asking???
song stuck in my head today


#19
Quote by bWsWwrestler
ya pretty much. o well sorry for the trouble ill just do some more research

"Pretty much" to what? Just state your question clearly and we'll help you out.
#20
Dude just read the sticky thoroughly, give it time, play more, get more familiar with things, learn songs, go for some lessons maybe.
Proud Owner of:

Jackson RR3
Jackson WRMG

Quote by madbasslover
What's the big deal with Gibsons, anyway?
I've heard loads of Gibsons being played before
and they don't sound any more special than
any other guitar.

^UG's King Of Fail.
#21
If you are just talking about how many notes of the scale to play on each string, it doesn't matter at all. You could play every note of a scale on one string and it would still be the same scale.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.