#1
so I was jamming with a couple of friends a couple of times this week, and I'm usually a very bluesy player. Occasionally we would play metal, and whenever we did so, my friends would say i was playing choppy. I've only been playing for about 8 months, and i was playing through a **** amp, but still. Is there anyway i can correct this?
#4
Practice slowly with a metronome, making sure every note sounds perfect and not 'choppy'.
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#5
Metal generally takes more technical skill than blues, so considering you're still very new at playing, I'd guess that's your problem. Just keep practicing and keep it up. Lessons help too, if you're not already taking them. It prevents many bad technique habits over the years.
#6
The more skilled and adept at playing guitar you become, the better your overall playing starts to sound. You get more used to where to put your fingers, how to pick, how to get the right vibrato, etc for the best possible sound.
#7
Playing for eight months? Sounds like you're trying to do too much at once. Not many people can play bluesy AND metally cuz they're different skill sets. Blues is about emotion and metal is about speed. The only way to correct this is through practice and knowledge, but sometimes one can't make the transition even if one tries. BB King can't shred and Stevie Vai can't play the blues (contrary to what Crossroads tries to imply). Maybe the best thing is to concentrate on something in between, like rock (LZ, GnR). Anyway...that's for YOU to decide.
#8
Quote by wildyoda2
Blues is about emotion and metal is about speed. The only way to correct this is through practice and knowledge, but sometimes one can't make the transition even if one tries. BB King can't shred and Stevie Vai can't play the blues (contrary to what Crossroads tries to imply) .



Nope
Anyone can make the transition. BB could shred if he put the effort into it, viceversa. And saying "Blues is about emotion and metal is about speed" is ridiculous
#9
My friend still says I play choppy, I just do its how I play, keep in mind that the guitar player isnt supposed to produce all or even most of the music in a band (contrary to what your shedder friend thinks). Also it could seriously be your amp, no joke ****ty distortion lends itself to choppier playing.
#10
Quote by wildyoda2
Blues is about emotion and metal is about speed.


very little metal is above 150bpm. a lot of metal is heavily influenced by blues as well.
#11
Quote by wildyoda2
Playing for eight months? Sounds like you're trying to do too much at once. Not many people can play bluesy AND metally cuz they're different skill sets. Blues is about emotion and metal is about speed. The only way to correct this is through practice and knowledge, but sometimes one can't make the transition even if one tries. BB King can't shred and Stevie Vai can't play the blues (contrary to what Crossroads tries to imply). Maybe the best thing is to concentrate on something in between, like rock (LZ, GnR). Anyway...that's for YOU to decide.


You know, if you bother listening to any of SRVs faster stuff you'd notice that there are times when the speed of his playing easily reaches a level that you'd find in metal or even shred.

There are also plenty of Metal players who are heavily influenced by blues. Think Kirk Hammett Zakk Wylde, Dimebag etc... Hell Listen to Satriani's Super Colossal album and tell me that's not got major blues influence.

Quote by slayer1516
Nope
Anyone can make the transition. BB could shred if he put the effort into it, viceversa. And saying "Blues is about emotion and metal is about speed" is ridiculous


Well, I wouldn't go that far, but the point you're getting at is definitely on the money. Blues has to do with the phrasing of your licks, speed is not relevant. Is it about emotion? Sure, it can be, it can also be blisteringly fast licks that simply sound cool.

On the flip side, does shred/metal lack emotion or feel? Is it all about speed? Some of it certainly is. But what about guys like Marty Friedman, Joe Satriani, Even Steve Vai? I'd say they've got more than just speed in their corner, and I'd say they all can convey emotion just fine, despite the obscene speeds they play at.

Quote by mr. cool
My friend still says I play choppy, I just do its how I play, keep in mind that the guitar player isnt supposed to produce all or even most of the music in a band (contrary to what your shedder friend thinks). Also it could seriously be your amp, no joke ****ty distortion lends itself to choppier playing.


Are you saying your leads are choppy or your rhythms? I'm assuming you mean leads, so... Here's how to fix it....

First, it's probably not your amp. A ****ty amp can make you sound bad, but there's no reason it would make you sound choppy.

Get your metronome out, or search for an online one if you don't have one. Plug your guitar in and get the cleanest sound you can, no gain, no reverb, no echo, no effects period.

Do the spider drill
Do scales
Do any repeating exercise that involves any kind of repeating pattern you can play.

You need to start any of these out very slowly, and you're going to put your focus on getting each individual note to ring out as long as possible with as little space inbetween the two as you can. This is NOT as easy as it sounds, especially at a slow speed. If you're changing strings, you want the string you were on to stop ringing the moment you hit the string. Gradually increase the speed as you go. Once you get to a point where your playing is again choppy, you want to slow the metronome down and start again.

This is a long process, and it's something most newer players don't pay much attention to. It's not something they notice right away either. I met a guy who'd been playing two years, and he could play lightning fast, but every note sounded choppy and staccato because he hadn't practiced sustaining his notes properly.
#12
I just mute alot...like i said, its how I play (its not a lack of skill I definately can play not choppy if I really wanted to)

and when playing rhythm it really can be the amp...bad distortion makes your notes sound clipped rather than making them wail like a good distortion will.
#13
Quote by Pastorius666
and whenever we did so, my friends would say i was playing choppy.


"choppy" could mean a lot of things. Probably your friends just don't have a better
ear to be able to be more specific.

8 months isn't a lot of time to for most people to be in very good control of very
much or have your technique very developed. Getting out the metronome and
working on your timing is always good practice. Don't focus on speed. Focus
on note QUALITY without notes anticipating or lagging the beat. Look to get
control and keep damaged, missing, broken, and out of time notes out of
your practice sessions.
#14
Quote by Pastorius666
so I was jamming with a couple of friends a couple of times this week, and I'm usually a very bluesy player. Occasionally we would play metal, and whenever we did so, my friends would say i was playing choppy. I've only been playing for about 8 months, and i was playing through a **** amp, but still. Is there anyway i can correct this?

well its only been 8 months. this can take time to smooth out. but even then, ive heard players who have been playing for years who are still choppy. why? they dont practice properly. when you keep playing the wrong things over and over, thats all thats going to stick. you need to practice licks, scales, patterns, etc... and really focus on accuracy, tone, finger placement, etc... you need to start off slow and build up over time. just keep practicing and make sure you pay attention to your sound. maybe try some legato in your playing. if you pick every note, it may sound choppy.

but for the most part, i think its mostly because you arent very experienced yet. just keep playing, practicing and keep trying to improve. everyone has to start somewhere.