#1
so.. i took lessons a while back and when jamming my teacher always had me play A pent. minor scale in the key of A maj. And E pent min in the key of E maj.

this never made sense to me but it never really bugged me until now..

so my question is.. is that how pent. scales are suppose to be used?
cuz it doesnt make any sense if the note would be out of key
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#2
The pent is in the scale, its just thirds and minors of certain notes. Also, a pent only has 6 notes and a maj or minor scale has 8.
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#3
^Pentatonic has 5 notes and a full Western scale has 7 notes.

If you have a blue or rock-style progression, the minor third will give you that gritty sound you want. It is out of key, but that's okay. In blues/rock music, it is more common to play a G over an E chord than a G#.

The opposite is not true; it would be ususual to play an E major pentatonic lick over an Em chord.

You can also use the E minor pentatonic over something in E minor, but that should make sense.
#4
Quote by bangoodcharlote
^Pentatonic has 5 notes and a full Western scale has 7 notes.

If you have a blue or rock-style progression, the minor third will give you that gritty sound you want. It is out of key, but that's okay. In blues/rock music, it is more common to play a G over an E chord than a G#.

The opposite is not true; it would be ususual to play an E major pentatonic lick over an Em chord.

You can also use the E minor pentatonic over something in E minor, but that should make sense.


thanks! i just wasnt sure..
cuz my teacher was good at guitar but he didnt know crap when it came to theory.
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#5
Quote by victoryaloy
thanks! i just wasnt sure..
cuz my teacher was good at guitar but he didnt know crap when it came to theory.

I assume you've stopped these lessons based on your first post, but if you're still taking lessons get a different teacher.
#6
Quote by :-D
but if you're still taking lessons get a different teacher.
I wouldn't do anything that drastic, not yet. I see nothing wrong with working with a guitarist who will teach you proper technique and taste and style.


You don't even need to learn theory from a guitarist.
#7
I personally would want a teacher who knows theory well just because IMO it's easier to explain concepts having such knowledge. Just my two cents.

EDIT: I would prefer to learn theory from a guitarist as well, so that you can see how certain musical concepts are applied to the guitar, such as the connection between diminished chords or drop-2 voicings.
#8
depends on what level you are at.

you can always still learn something him even if he doesn't know theory
.
#9
A neat way of doing things is for example, lets say you have the rhythm guitarist shifting between an Amaj7 and a Bm7 kind of like a II,V,I sort of thing so you can throw in the E7 as well. And now you want to use some pentatonic to solo over that.

On the I chord (Amaj7) you can use the Pentatonic Minor on the relative minor, so you can play F# Pentatonic minor. You can also simple use the A Pentatonic Major which can be seen as the second "mode" of the Pentatonic minor.

On the II chord (Bm7) you can solo on I,IV,and V major pentatonic. So you can solo in A pentatonic major, D pentatonic major, or E pentatonic major.


This is mostly straight from the Scott Henderson book on pentatonics.

You can play an A Pentatonic Minor over the A major chord but it is gonna sound a lil out because of the flat third and might only work with blues as it adds some tension.
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Last edited by Eternal_One at Apr 14, 2008,
#10
Quote by bangoodcharlote
^Pentatonic has 5 notes and a full Western scale has 7 notes.

If you have a blue or rock-style progression, the minor third will give you that gritty sound you want. It is out of key, but that's okay. In blues/rock music, it is more common to play a G over an E chord than a G#.

The opposite is not true; it would be ususual to play an E major pentatonic lick over an Em chord.

You can also use the E minor pentatonic over something in E minor, but that should make sense.
I've never thought lingering on that m3 in major tonality sounds good. Great accidental though, very bluesy/jazzy. But M3 in minor tonality sounds good too in some cases, very devious and rough, great for metal.